Bioness StimRouter Cleared in Europe to Treat Fecal Incontinence

Bioness, a Valencia, California firm, won European regulatory approval for its StimRouter neuromodulation system to treat fecal incontinence. Previously cleared in the EU as a tool for managing chronic pain and overactive bladder, the new indicati...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: GI Neurology Neurosurgery Source Type: blogs

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ConclusionDutch and Belgian urogynaecologists estimate success and adverse effect rates of MUS in line with the literature. Their patients most cited worries were fear of chronic pain and exposure. Only half of respondents had ever performed a colposuspension. They were older and performed the procedure via laparotomy.
Source: International Urogynecology Journal - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Medtronic and Axonics are getting ready to square off in sacral neuromodulation, a fast-growing market that was monopolized by Medtronic until a month ago. Last month, Axonics won FDA approval to market its implantable rechargeable sacral neuromodulation (r-SNM) device for the treatment of fecal incontinence, and the company is expected to get FDA approval for overactive bladder and urinary retention any time now. The fecal incontinence approval includes the claim of a 15-year functional life and the ability of patients to undergo full-body MRI scans without the necessity of having the device explanted. Medtron...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Business Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: The indications for SNM in the German health care system can be expected to be expanded upon the chronic pelvic pain syndrome, erectile dysfunction and additional gastrointestinal conditions. Technical progress will continue to improve the risk-benefit ratio of SNM. PMID: 31139864 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Der Urologe. Ausg. A - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Urologe A Source Type: research
Authors: Vacher P, Charlanes A, Chesnel C, Pagès A, Malot C, Le Breton F, Amarenco G, Manceau P Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this article was to describe the diagnostic and therapeutic value of transcranial stimulation in pelvic and perineal disorders. METHODS: A literature review (Medline database and Google scholar) with no time limit was performed using keywords: "transcranial direct stimulation", "transcranial magnetic stimulation", "neurogenic bladder", "urinary incontinence", "Parkinson disease", "multiple sclerosis", "stroke",...
Source: Progres en Urologie - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Prog Urol Source Type: research
This study also found that Proteus DNA, a genus with many uropathogenic species (Drzewiecka, 2016), was more prevalent in women with OAB compared to asymptomatic controls (Curtiss et al., 2017). IC A recent study by Abernethy et al. suggested that the microbiome may play a role in IC (Abernethy et al., 2017). In this study, 16S rRNA analysis determined the microbiome of catheterized urine from women (n = 40) with IC was not dominated by a single genus and was less likely to contain Lactobacillus compared to asymptomatic women. Abernethy et al. also showed that L. acidophilus was associated with less severe scores on the ...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
As a urogynecology surgeon, Alexandra Haessler, MD, has seen firsthand the limitations of current overactive bladder (OAB) therapies. Aside from medication, the current gold standard for OAB is Medtronic's InterStim, an implantable sacral neuromodulation device that is FDA approved for the treatment of OAB as well as chronic fecal incontinence, and non-obstructive urinary retention. Haessler told MD+DI that the InterStim device works very well but it's an expensive treatment and access is limited because only a few subspecialists in any one metropolitan area are truly qualified to deliver the therapy. The InterStim is not ...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Business Source Type: news
Kate V. Meriwether1*, Zhenmin Lei1, Rajbir Singh2, Jeremy Gaskins3, Deslyn T. G. Hobson1 and Venkatakrishna Jala2 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, United States 2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, United States 3Department of Bioinformatics and Biostatistics, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, United States Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (ICBPS) may be related to an altered genitourinary microbiome. Our aim was to compare the vaginal and urinary microbiomes b...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Abstract In specialist urology clinics, 50 - 70 % of patients have chronic urological diseases such as recurrent urinary tract infections, a somatoform overactive bladder, adult and infantile enuresis, a chronic pelvic pain syndrome, and the psychosomatic form of post-prostatectomy incontinence. The 12-month prevalence of psychological disorders in the general adult population is 28 % 1. As many as 20 % of children and adolescents are found to have psychological abnormalities 2. These are frequently accompanied by somatoform symptoms, often consisting of a psychosomatic voiding disorder with a consecutiv...
Source: Aktuelle Urologie - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Aktuelle Urol Source Type: research
Today’s neurostimulators, such as those used to control chronic pain, bladder incontinence, and depression, use electricity to activate nerves. While very effective in many patients, electrical stimulation can lead to inflammation, produce unwa...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Genetics Materials Rehab Urology Source Type: blogs
, Takács P Abstract Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) is a minimally invasive, safe and well-tolerated neuromodulation technique for the lower urinary tract dysfunctions. PTNS delivers neuromodulation to the pelvic floor through the S2-4 junction of the sacral nerve plexus via the route of the posterior tibial nerve. Using the fine needle electrode insertion above the ankle, the tibial nerve is accessed, which connected to the stimulator. To date despite of its excessive clinical use, PTNS mechanism of action still remains unclear. The technique seems to be an efficacious and safe treatment for o...
Source: Orvosi Hetilap - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Orv Hetil Source Type: research
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