The Landscape Montage Technique for diagnosing frontotemporal dementia starting as primary progressive aphasia: a case report

ConclusionsThe present study showed that the Landscape Montage Technique can be useful for diagnosing behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia that starts as logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia at earlier stages.
Source: Journal of Medical Case Reports - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research

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Authors: Keenan R, Chepulis L, Ly J, Carter S, Lao C, Asim M, Bhat A, Deo S, Lim KP, Mohammed R, Scarlet S, Lawrenson R Abstract INTRODUCTION Life expectancy in patients with schizophrenia is 15-20 years less than the general population. A dominant cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients is cardiovascular disease. Adverse consequences of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors can be reduced by regular monitoring of metabolic outcomes and intervention if required. AIM To evaluate the metabolic screening in primary care for patients with schizoaffective disorders managed in primary care. To show the useful...
Source: Journal of Primary Health Care - Category: Primary Care Tags: J Prim Health Care Source Type: research
Authors: Stević M, Vlajković M, Veličković F, Stanojević G, Nestorović M, Petrović F Abstract A 69 year old patient was admitted to hospital with massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The clinical presentation of the patient, except for bleeding, was dominated by the presence of neurofibromatosis type 1 - Von Recklinghausen disease. The patient was referred to multislice computed tomography (CT) angiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy, which were performed without successful detection of the bleeding site. The MRI examination showed the existence of a tumor lo...
Source: Hellenic Journal of Nuclear Medicine - Category: Nuclear Medicine Tags: Hell J Nucl Med Source Type: research
Dear Colleagues: Welcome to the January-February 2018 issue of Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience (ICNS). This is a milestone year for us as it marks the beginning of our 15th year of publication! We are pleased to continue serving you, our valued readers and colleagues, by providing peer-reviewed, evidence-based information on the latest innovations in both research and clinical practice in the field of neuroscience. We’d like to thank those dedicated readers who have been with us since 2004, the year we launched the journal, and to welcome new readers who are just discovering ICNS and what it has to offer. We&rsq...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Editor's Message: Issue Highlights Source Type: research
People, including the Las Vegas sheriff and reporters are all obsessing over discovering Stephen Paddock's motive for mass murder. That's actually a very easy question.He was f.ing nuts.In case you don't want to take my word for ithere's neurobiologist David Eagleman explaining the possibilities. Just to summarize, Paddock wasn't schizophrenic -- that has onset typically before age 25, and he clearly was fully functional his whole life. And while it's conceivable he had some psychopathic tendencies, there isn't really any evidence of that. He wasn't the most sociable guy but he seemed generally well behaved. And even if he...
Source: Stayin' Alive - Category: American Health Source Type: blogs
"It's not what you said; it's how you said it!" How many times have you said or heard that while interacting with a family member or colleague? It is clear that tone of voice (modulations in pitch, loudness, and rhythm of speech, together called prosody) conveys a great deal of intent and emotion in nearly every exchange. Imagine that your spouse's response to a very special birthday gift is "I've never seen anything like it," spoken in a completely monotone voice. You would not be able to tell if he or she loves it or hates it. On the flip side, suppose you say to your spouse, lovingly, "I can har...
Source: Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Executive function, Frontotemporal dementia, Dementia aphasia EDITORIALS Source Type: research
This article does not include any meta-analysis and aims simply at providing a comprehensive overview of the raw data reported in this field to date, as an aid to researchers.
Source: Neurophysiologie Clinique - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
In this study using high angular resolution diffusion MRI (HARDI), we delineated for the first time, six major fiber connections of the human MdLF, four of which  are temporo-parietal and two temporo-occipital, by examining morphology, topography, cortical connections, biophysical measures, volume and length in seventy brains. Considering the cortical affiliations of the different connections of MdLF we suggested that this fiber tract may be related to lang uage, attention and integrative higher level visual and auditory processing associated functions. Furthermore, given the extensive connectivity provided to superio...
Source: Brain Imaging and Behavior - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
ConclusionAbout one‐fifth of the subjects receiving artificial nutrition were in a vegetative state. More than a few patients with mental disorders, including schizophrenia, also received long‐term artificial nutrition. We should pay more attention to chronic dysphasia syndrome in mental disorders.
Source: Psychogeriatrics - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
ConclusionAbout one‐fifth of the subjects receiving artificial nutrition were in a vegetative state. More than a few patients with mental disorders, including schizophrenia, also received long‐term artificial nutrition. We should pay more attention to chronic dysphasia syndrome in mental disorders.
Source: Psychogeriatrics - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Professor John Hodges MD, FRCP, FRACP, F Med Sci John is Professor of Cognitive Neurology at the University of New South Wales based at the Neuroscience Research Australia where he co-directs the Frontotemporal Dementia Research Group (FRONTIER www.ftdrg.org). John qualified in Medicine from London University with honours (1975) and undertook periods of psychiatric and neurological raining in Southampton, Oxford and San Diego and obtained his MD in 1988. From 1997 to 2007 he was the MRC Professor of Behavioural Neurology with a joint appointments in the Department of Clinical Neuroscience at Addenbrooke's Hospital and the ...
Source: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry - Category: Neurosurgery Tags: Dementia, Drugs: CNS (not psychiatric), Motor neurone disease, Neuroimaging, Neuromuscular disease, Parkinson's disease, Stroke, Memory disorders (psychiatry), Psychiatry of old age, Psychotic disorders (incl schizophrenia) PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS - DAY Source Type: research
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