Penn study paves way for new vaccines to protect infants against infections

(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A new Penn Medicine study puts researchers within closer reach of vaccines that can protect infants against infections by overcoming a mother's antibodies, which are known to shut down immune defenses initiated by conventional vaccines. That hurdle largely explains why vaccinations for infectious diseases like influenza and measles not given until six to 12 months of age. Findings from the preclinical study were published online today in Science Translational Medicine.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

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In this study, we aimed to decode molecular signatures and pathways of the host cells in response to SARS-CoV-2 and the rapid identification of repurposable drugs using bioinformatics and network biology strategies. We have analyzed available transcriptomic RNA-seq COVID-19 data to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs). We detected 177 DEGs specific for COVID-19 where 122 were upregulated and 55 were downregulated compared to control (FDR
Source: European Journal of Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Eur J Pharmacol Source Type: research
(American Chemical Society) Vaccines have curtailed the spread of several infectious diseases, such as smallpox, polio and measles. However, vaccines against some diseases, including HIV-1, influenza and malaria, don't work very well, and one reason could be the timing of antigen and adjuvant presentation to the immune system. Now, researchers reporting inACS Central Science developed an injectable hydrogel that allows sustained release of vaccine components, increasing the potency, quality and duration of immune responses in mice.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
While the world waits for a COVID-19 vaccine, children across the globe are going without shots already known to be life-saving. With the world in disarray due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the number of children vaccinated this year against infections like diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, measles and pneumococcal disease has fallen to levels not seen since the 1990s, according to a new report from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. “In other words,” the report reads, “we’ve been set back about 25 years in about 25 weeks.” That stark figure comes from the Gates Foundation’s annual Goalkee...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
This study offers a deeper perspec-tive on the available questionnaires, helping to identify the best one in terms of aim and study setting.   
Source: Journal of Preventive Medicine and Hygiene - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract BACKGROUND: Denmark has no general recommendations for vaccination of healthcare workers (HCWs). We explored the self-reported immunity to varicella, measles, mumps, and rubella, reasons for receiving the influenza vaccine or not, and opinions on vaccination of HCWs against varicella, MMR, pertussis, diphtheria, and influenza among staff from departments with a high risk of exposure to infectious agents. METHODS: From May 2019 to August 2019, a structured questionnaire was distributed to clinical and non-clinical HCWs at a tertiary and a general paediatric department in Denmark. Self-reported immunit...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
Conclusions and Implications of Key FindingsThe review yielded 37 articles and 267 sets of cost estimates. We found no cost-of-illness studies with cost estimates for hepatitis B, measles, rubella, or yellow fever from primary data. Most estimates were from countries in Gavi preparatory (28%) and accelerated (28%) transition, followed by those who are initiating self-financing (22%) and those not eligible for Gavi support (19%). Thirteen articles compared household expenses to manage illnesses with income and two articles with other household expenses, such as food, clothing, and rent. An episode of illness represented 1 &...
Source: PharmacoEconomics - Category: Health Management Source Type: research
By MICHEL ACCAD, MD With cases of COVID-19 either disappeared or rapidly diminishing from places like Wuhan, Italy, New York, and Sweden, many voices are speculating that herd immunity may have been reached in those areas and that it may be at hand in the remaining parts of the world that are still struggling with the pandemic.  Lockdowns should end—or may not have been needed to begin with, they conclude. Adding plausibility to their speculation is the discovery of biological evidence suggesting that prior exposure to other coronaviruses may confer some degree of immunity against SARS-CoV...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy immunity MICHEL ACCAD Pandemic Source Type: blogs
As the world reels from illnesses and deaths due to COVID-19, the race is on for a safe, effective, long-lasting vaccine to help the body block the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. The three vaccine approaches discussed here are among the first to be tested clinically in the United States. How vaccines induce immunity: The starting line In 1796, in a pastoral corner of England, and during a far more feudal and ethically less enlightened time, Edward Jenner, an English country surgeon, inoculated James Phipps, his gardener’s eight-year-old son, with cowpox pustules obtained from the arm of a milkmaid. It was widely belie...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Coronavirus and COVID-19 Health Infectious diseases Vaccines Source Type: blogs
Authors: Elhusseiny KM, Abd-Elshahed Abd-Elhay F, Kamel MG Abstract INTRODUCTION: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) has emerged in China. There are no available vaccines or antiviral drugs for COVID-19 patients. Herein, we represented possible therapeutic agents that may stand as a potential therapy against COVID-19. AREAS COVERED: We searched PubMed, Google Scholar, and clinicaltrials.gov for relevant papers. We showed some agents with potentially favorable efficacy, acceptable safety as well as good pharmacokinetic profiles. Several therapies are under assessment to evaluate their e...
Source: Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther Source Type: research
From 2018-2019, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation gave more money to the World Health Organization than any entity except the U.S. government. With President Donald Trump cutting ties to the international health agency in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Gates Foundation’s work has come into sharper relief than ever. Co-chair Bill Gates announced at the Global Vaccine Summit on June 4 that it will give $1.6 billion over five years to the Vaccine Alliance (GAVI), to help ensure that people around the world have access to vaccines, regardless of income. The Gates Foundation in 1999 pledged $750 million to he...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
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