GPs are dealing with growing flu rates

GP consultation rates rise to 19 per 100,000 Related items fromOnMedica European countries losing fight against measles Debate over mandatory MMR vaccination Flu activity appears to be nearing its peak Swine flu jab in pregnancy safe for children as well as mothers Patients often avoid vaccinations due to fear of side effects
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news

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You’ve done it! You’ve taken that last birth control pill, removed your IUD, or stopped using your contraceptive method of choice. You’ve made the decision to try to conceive a pregnancy, and while this is an exciting time in your life, it can also feel overwhelming. There is so much advice around fertility and pregnancy, and sifting through it all just isn’t possible. For many mothers, their goals crystallize around ensuring that their baby is healthy. Evidence-based steps that may prevent birth defects January is Birth Defects Prevention Month, so we want to focus on things you can do to reduce th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Family Planning and Pregnancy Fertility Vaccines Women's Health Source Type: blogs
Authors: Blackmore TK, Bloomfield M, Burge S, Low K, Dzhelali M, Nesdale A PMID: 31945050 [PubMed - in process]
Source: New Zealand Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: N Z Med J Source Type: research
The rise of vaccine-preventable illnesses, such as measles and hepatitis, in the United States and around the globe has been alarming in recent years. For women — especially those hoping to become pregnant, as well as women who are pregnant or have recently had a baby — vaccines can be a worrisome topic. There are many misconceptions about vaccine safety in and around pregnancy that can lead to confusion and unnecessary fear of a lifesaving medical tool. As a practicing ob/gyn, I often discuss vaccines with my patients and help them sort out fears versus facts. Which vaccines should you consider before concepti...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Parenting Pregnancy Vaccines Women's Health Source Type: blogs
Measles became a health emergency this year when more than 642 cases were confirmed in NYC since 09/2018. Measles can be associated with serious maternal and fetal complications and uncertainty regarding immunity has created anxiety among pregnant patients and concern among healthcare providers regarding optimal management. The aim of this study is to describe the prevalence of measles immunity in our cohort.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Oral Concurrent 4 Source Type: research
As of 7/29/2019, there have been 642 confirmed cases of measles in NYC this year. Pregnant women and their fetuses represent a susceptible population to measles infection. Ideally, proof of vaccination against measles should be documented prenatally. In the absence of such data, measles immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers can be used. Prior studies conducted before the present measles outbreak showed maternal measles IgG titers (MIT) to be in the non-immune range between 3.1-16.5% of the time. The percentage of pregnant women with MIT in the immune range during the current measles outbreak is unknown.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Poster Session II Source Type: research
The objective of this study was to determine whether titers were more often below the threshold for immunity in pregnant women than would otherwise be expected for their age.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Poster Session III Source Type: research
Measles is a communicable disease caused by a RNA virus, member of the Morbillivirus genus in the family of Paramyxoviridae1. Measles is usually transmitted through respiratory droplets to close contacts, but also through smaller particle aerosols remaining in the air for up to two hours after an infected person leaves an area2.
Source: Journal of Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
‚ÄčI have been seeing a lot of second disease and fifth disease—it's that time of year. School is back in session, and winter is just around the corner.The rash-numbering system for these diseases is now a historical footnote, but fifth disease is still commonly used by physicians to refer to erythema infectiosum, a parvovirus. I suspect that this system was created as a memory device for similar names and the obscure Latin terms used for these diseases. Erythema infectiosum is also easy to confuse with the many other erythema rashes such as erythema migrans, erythema marginatum, erythema toxicum, and erythema multif...
Source: M2E Too! Mellick's Multimedia EduBlog - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs
PHE tells GPs to call in all eligible children for nasal spray by early December, and to use injected vaccine if no spray available Related items fromOnMedica Adjuvanted trivalent flu vaccine best option for over-65s Parental confidence in immunisation programme ‘very high’ Should we have compulsory measles vaccination at school entry? Statins of small and uncertain benefit in primary prevention Swine flu jab in pregnancy safe for children as well as mothers
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
Infants are more vulnerable to measles infection than previously thought, a new study suggests. The findings debunk notions that most babies are protected for much of their first year by maternal antibodies passed on through pregnancy.
Source: CBC | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news
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