Gen X Women Get Less Sleep Than Any Other Generation. What ’s Keeping Them Up?

In the middle of the night, I wake up feeling warm. I open the window and pull my hair back into a ponytail and drink some water. Then I glance at my phone, delete a few things, and see some spam. I hit unsubscribe and go back to bed. Then I lie there thinking, What if by opening that spam email I got myself hacked? What if I just sent everyone in my contact list a Burger King ad at two in the morning? Now wide awake, I move on to other concerns: my parents’ health, my stepson’s college tuition, pending deadlines. Hours roll by. I tackle real-life math problems: how many weeks I have before getting my next freelance check, how many years until my husband and I pay off our mortgage, how much will be in my retirement account in 2040, how many hours of sleep I will get on this night. Six… five and a half… Then it’s six a.m., time to make breakfast and send my 13-year-old son off to school. Members of Generation X like me—those born between 1965 and 1980—report sleeping fewer hours per night than their Silent Generation grandparents, Boomers, Millennials and Generation Z. Sleeplessness is particularly common among Gen X women, a third of whom get less than seven hours a night on average. Even compared to Gen X men, we do worse when it comes to both falling asleep and staying asleep. A 2017 national report found that perimenopausal women were least likely to sleep more than seven hours a night, followed by postmenopausal women. Elinor ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Gen X healthy sleep insomnia Source Type: news

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Publication date: 15 February 2021Source: Journal of Hazardous Materials, Volume 404, Part BAuthor(s): Yanhua Liu, Yang Li, Shanshan Dong, Lu Han, Ruixin Guo, Yourong Fu, Shenghu Zhang, Jianqiu Chen
Source: Journal of Hazardous Materials - Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research
We describe the most highly recommended generic and disease-specific PRO tools in SCD and discuss the challenges of incorporating them in clinical practice. EXPERT OPINION: PRO measures are essential to incorporate into SCD clinical trials either as primary or secondary outcomes. The use of PRO measures in SCD facilitates a patient-centered approach, which is likely to lead to improved outcomes. Significant challenges remain in adapting PRO tools to routine clinical use and in developing countries. PMID: 33034214 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Expert Review of Hematology - Category: Hematology Tags: Expert Rev Hematol Source Type: research
Authors: Musio F Abstract INTRODUCTION: Anemia has and will continue to be a central theme in medicine particularly as clinicians are treating a burgeoning population of complex multi-organ system processes. As a result of multiple randomized controlled trials (RCTs), meta-analyses, and societal recommendations overly restrictive paradigms and under-administration of erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs) have likely been followed by clinicians among all specialties. AREAS COVERED: A review of anemia in the context of chronic kidney disease, hematologic malignancies and cancer is presented with focus on the e...
Source: Expert Review of Hematology - Category: Hematology Tags: Expert Rev Hematol Source Type: research
Authors: Zhang W, Xu JZ, Lu XH, Li H, Wang D, Wang JG Abstract PURPOSE: We hypothesise that dietary sodium intake interacts with serum uric acid to influence blood pressure (BP) in children and adolescents. In the present study, we investigated ambulatory BP in relation to hyperuricaemia, dietary sodium intake and their interaction in children and adolescents with hypertension. MATERIALS AND METHODS:  A total of 616 study participants were 10-24 years old and had primary hypertension diagnosed after admission in a specialised inpatient ward. Ambulatory BP monitoring was performed during hospitalisat...
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Conclusion: These findings suggest that consumption of peanuts high in oleic acid (D7) may have the potential to delay primary fatty liver symptoms. PMID: 33033472 [PubMed]
Source: Food and Nutrition Research - Category: Nutrition Authors: Tags: Food Nutr Res Source Type: research
Authors: Sabet Sarvestani F, Azarpira N Abstract Heart and cerebral infarctions, as two important ischemic diseases, lead to the death of tissues due to inadequate blood supply and high mortality worldwide. These statuses are started via blockage of vessels and depletion of oxygen and nutrients which affected these areas. After reperfusion and restoration of oxygen supply, more severe injury was mediated by multifaceted cascades of inflammation and oxidative stress. microRNAs (miRNAs) as the regulator of biological and pathological pathways can adjust these conditions by interaction with their targets. Also, miRNAs...
Source: Immunological Investigations - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Immunol Invest Source Type: research
Publication date: January 2021Source: Urology Case Reports, Volume 34Author(s): Nina Al-Saadi, Safa Al-Musawi, Yousuf Khan, Daben Dawam
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Source: European Journal of Sport Science - Category: Sports Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Pain Medicine Source Type: forums
Authors: Matti B, Zargar-Shoshtari K Abstract Prostate cancer represents a significant health burden worldwide. The cancer incidence had substantially increased since the introduction of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in cancer screening. This had led to considerable debates among health professionals and epidemiologists, since PSA as a screening tool seemed to be far from perfect. In New Zealand, the controversy was quite prominent in the last three decades, with some advocating the benefits of screening, while others concerned regarding the risk of harms. With the absence of an organised screening programme and ...
Source: New Zealand Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: N Z Med J Source Type: research
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