A genetic origin for acid –base imbalance triggers the mitochondrial damage that explains the autoimmune response and drives to gastric neuroendocrine tumours

ConclusionsA genetic origin that drives mitochondria alteration would initiate the gastric chronic inflammation instead of the classical IL-17 secretion-mediated mechanism explanation. Gastric euchlorhydria restoration is suggested to be indicated for mitochondrial recover. Our results open a new window to understand gastric neoplasms formation but also the inflammatory mechanisms and autoimmune disorders conducted by genetic origin that composes a premalignant scenario.
Source: Gastric Cancer - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research

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ConclusionsCLEAN-NET with SNNS preserved a better QOL and nutrition status than LADG in patients with early gastric cancer.
Source: Gastric Cancer - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
This study aimed to evaluate synergistic effect of Rubus crataegifolius (RF) and Ulmus macrocarpa Hance (UL) against H. pylori. Antibacterial susceptibility of each extract either separately or in combination was studied against two H. pylori standard strains and 11 clinical isolates using agar dilution method. The effect of the extracts on H. pylori inoculated Balb/c mice model was also studied using single dosing (100 mg/kg each) approach. The MIC50 of RF and UL were more than 100 and 200 µg/ml, respectively, against the tested strains. However, simultaneous treatment with RF and UL at 75 and 50 µg/ml, respec...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
AbstractThe late 1800s Louis Pasteur and Robert Koch introduced and popularized the germ theory of disease. At that time, gastric cancer was the most common cause of cancer deaths in most countries making the stomach an early site of microbial research with a focus on gastric luminal and mucosal bacteria and the role of Boas-Oppler bacillus (Lactobacillus) in the diagnosis of gastric cancer. In the 1970s, the  research focus evolved to studies of the gastric microbiome in the production of nitrosamines and included development of the Correa cascade. Interest in nitrosamine production peaked in the late 1980s and was r...
Source: Digestive Diseases and Sciences - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Conclusions. In this population with high rates of gastric cancer, we found that just over half of the H. pylori contained an intact cagPAI and 40 % had the vacA s1/i1/m1 genotype. Infection with these strains was associated with a more severe gastropathy. PMID: 32011229 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Medical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: J Med Microbiol Source Type: research
AbstractHelicobacter pylori is an important human pathogen that causes gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers, and gastric cancer. O-polysaccharides ofH. pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are composed of ( β1→3)-poly(N-acetyllactosamine) (polyLacNAc) decorated with multiple α-L-fucose residues. In many strains, their terminal LacNAc units are mono- or difucosylated to mimic Lewis X (Lex) and/or Lewis Y (Ley) oligosaccharides. The studies in rhesus macaques as a model of human infection byH. pylori showed that this bacterium adapts to the host during colonization by expressing host Lewis antigens. Here, we cha...
Source: Biochemistry (Moscow) - Category: Biochemistry Source Type: research
Conditions:   Intestinal Metaplasia of Gastric Mucosa;   Gastric Dysplasia;   Gastric Cancer;   Atrophic Gastritis Intervention:   Diagnostic Test: Mucosal Irrigation Sponsor:   New York Presbyterian Hospital Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Authors: Annibale B, Esposito G, Lahner E Abstract SUMMARYIntroduction: Atrophic gastritis (AG) is a complex syndrome which arise as consequence of H. pylori infection or in the context of gastric autoimmunity. It often deserves a benign course, but may lead to potentially life-threatening complications: cancer and anaemia. This review aims to address traditional and innovative knowledge on this often under-diagnosed disorder.Areas covered: This review covers clinical presentation, risk factors, diagnosis and management of AG and provides an updated resource for clinicians to get insight in this challenging disorde...
Source: Expert Review of Gastroenterology and Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol Source Type: research
This study investigated the molecular targets of the component herbs of QLSP in preventing precancerous lesions based on network pharmacology. Network pharmacology analysis revealed that the 6 herbs regulated multiple CAG-related genes, among which the most important were cancer-related pathway (apoptosis, p53, and VEGF) and epithelial cell signaling in Helicobacter pylori infection. Further animal experiments showed that the expression of survivin and p53 in precancerous lesions of CAG rats was significantly increased which was suppressed by QLSP. Moreover, telomerase activity was inhibited in precancerous lesions of CAG ...
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
Forty-five years have passed since Correa et  al1 proposed their hypothesis on the histopathological cascade leading to gastric adenocarcinoma claiming that gastric cancer usually resulted from chronic gastritis, subsequently leading to gland loss or atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, and eventually invasive cancer. The most common ri sk factor for gastritis soon revealed to be the colonization with Helicobacter pylori.2 Most infections occur during childhood and remain for life. They are almost invariably associated with chronic gastritis, which may eventually lead to a loss of mucosal glands.
Source: Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Mentoring, Education, and Training Corner Source Type: research
Macrophages have a major role in infectious and inflammatory diseases, and the available data suggest that Helicobacter pylori persistence can be explained in part by the failure of the bacterium to be killed by professional phagocytes. Macrophages are cells ready to kill the engulfed pathogen, through oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms; however, their killing potential can be further augmented by the intervention of T helper (Th) cells upon the specific recognition of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-II–peptide complexes on the surface of the phagocytic cells. As it pertains to H. pylori, the bacterium is eng...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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