Efficacy of fractional CO2 laser treatment in postmenopausal women with genitourinary syndrome: a multicenter study

Objective: Genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM), especially vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA), is one of the most common conditions among women in either natural (4%-47%) or medically induced (23.4%-61.5%) menopause. The aims of this study are to assess the efficacy and effectiveness of CO2 laser in postmenopausal women with clinical signs and symptoms of GSM, in particular VVA, and to evaluate both possible early and late side effects related to this kind of treatment. Methods: This retrospective, multicenter study was conducted after collecting data from a pre-existing database. We performed three to four CO2 laser treatments on all the women enrolled in this protocol. We used a fractional CO2 laser system (SmartXide2 V2LR, Deka m.e.l.a., Florence, Italy) with a VulvoVaginal Laser Reshaping (V2LR) scanning system and appropriate handpieces for the vaginal area. All women before and after the treatment were assessed. The pre- and post-treatment averages of the symptoms, the standard deviation, and the P values were calculated. Results: Six hundred forty-five women who met the inclusion criteria were considered. In all the parameters examined (dyspareunia, vaginal orifice pain, dryness/atrophy, itching, burning, pH) statistically significant data were found between the pretreatment and the post-treatment (dryness: before = 8.30, after = 2.97 [P 
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Original Studies Source Type: research

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Did you ever wonder why medical research seems to flip-flop so often? Eggs used to be terrible for your health; now they’re not so bad. Stomach ulcers were thought to be due to stress and a “type A personality” but that’s been disproven. I was taught that every postmenopausal woman should take hormone replacement therapy to prevent heart disease and bone loss; now it’s considered way too risky. It can make you question every bit of medical news you hear. But maybe that’s not such a bad thing. Questioning what you read or hear is reasonable. And maybe medical reversals — when new re...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Medical Research Prevention Tests and procedures Source Type: blogs
AbstractIntroductionSurgery by open radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer is associated with sexual dysfunction as well as lymphedema and bladder problems. Our aim was to assess the impact of robot ‐assisted laparoscopic radical hysterectomy (RRH) with pelvic lymphadenectomy for early‐stage cervical cancer on sexual, bowel, bladder, and lymphatic function and to measure ovarian function after RRH.Material and methodsTwenty ‐six women with early‐stage cervical cancer during 2011‐2013 were investigated before and 1 year after RRH using a validated questionnaire measuring psychological well‐being and sexua...
Source: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research
AbstractIntroductionSurgery by open radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer is associated with sexual dysfunction as well as lymphedema and bladder problems. Our aim was to assess the impact of robot ‐assisted laparoscopic radical hysterectomy (RRH) with pelvic lymphadenectomy for early‐stage cervical cancer on sexual, bowel, bladder, and lymphatic function and to measure ovarian function after RRH.Material and methodsTwenty ‐six women with early‐stage cervical cancer during 2011‐2013 were investigated before and 1 year after RRH using a validated questionnaire measuring psychological well‐being and sexua...
Source: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research
AbstractIntroductionSurgery by open radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer is associated with sexual dysfunction as well as lymphedema and bladder problems. Our aim was to assess the impact of robot ‐assisted laparoscopic radical hysterectomy (RRH) with pelvic lymphadenectomy, for early stage cervical cancer on sexual‐, bowel‐, bladder‐ and lymphatic function and to measure ovarian function after RRH.Material and methodsTwenty ‐six women with early stage cervical cancer during 2011‐2013 were investigated before and one year after RRH using a validated questionnaire measuring psychological well‐bei...
Source: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research
This spring, 31-year-old Heather Bankos donated her uterus through a research program at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas, becoming about the 70th woman to do so worldwide. Bankos does not know the identity of her recipient, but most women in Baylor’s program have Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome, a congenital condition that occurs in females, leading to an underdeveloped or absent uterus. Bankos, who lives in Pennsylvania and has three kids of her own (ages 8, 6 and 3), explains why she wanted to donate her uterus, and what she hopes it brings to its recipient. —Jamie Ducharme, TIME staff...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized medicine Source Type: news
Filomena Corbo1†, Giacomina Brunetti2*†, Pasquale Crupi3, Sara Bortolotti4, Giuseppina Storlino4, Laura Piacente5, Alessia Carocci1, Alessia Catalano1, Gualtiero Milani1, Graziana Colaianni4, Silvia Colucci2, Maria Grano4, Carlo Franchini1, Maria Lisa Clodoveo6, Gabriele D'Amato7 and Maria Felicia Faienza5 1Department of Pharmacy-Drug science, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, Italy 2Section of Human Anatomy and Histology, Department of Basic and Medical Sciences, Neurosciences and Sense Organs, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, Italy 3CREA-VE, Council for Agricultural Research and Economics&ndas...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
This study also found that Proteus DNA, a genus with many uropathogenic species (Drzewiecka, 2016), was more prevalent in women with OAB compared to asymptomatic controls (Curtiss et al., 2017). IC A recent study by Abernethy et al. suggested that the microbiome may play a role in IC (Abernethy et al., 2017). In this study, 16S rRNA analysis determined the microbiome of catheterized urine from women (n = 40) with IC was not dominated by a single genus and was less likely to contain Lactobacillus compared to asymptomatic women. Abernethy et al. also showed that L. acidophilus was associated with less severe scores on the ...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
In conclusion, our results suggest that the addition of BFR to exercise contributes to neuromuscular adaptations only when RT is performed with low-load. Furthermore, we found a significant association between the changes in [HHb] (i.e., metabolic stress) and increases in muscle CSA from T2 to T3 only for the LL-BFR, when muscle edema was attenuated. Introduction Resistance training- (RT) induced changes in muscle strength are partially due to increases in muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) (i.e., muscle hypertrophy) and changes in muscle architecture (e.g., increase in the pennation angle of muscle fibers) (Aagaard...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
In this study, we found that the activities of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and mineralized nodules in MC3T3-E1 cells were both significantly increased after treatment with AG (5, 10, and 20 μM). Meanwhile, the mRNA and protein levels of osteoblastic marker genes in MC3T3-E1 cells after AG treatment were markedly increased compared with a control group. In addition, the levels of BMP-2, p-Smad1/5/9, and Runx2 were significantly elevated in AG-treated MC3T3-E1 cells. Moreover, we found that the protein levels of Erk1/2, p-Erk1/2, p38, p-p38, and p-JNK were also significantly increased in AG-treated MC3T3-E1 cells compared ...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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