Blood pressure drug tends to slow coronary disease research finds

Patients with clogged and hardened arteries who already have their blood pressure under control may benefit from an additional blood pressure-lowering medication, according to research from the Cleveland Clinic Coordinating Center for Clinical Research (C5Research). The researchers found that the renin-inhibitor aliskiren tended to slow coronary disease progression and reduced the risk of death, stroke and heart attack in these patients by about 50 percent, compared to placebo, suggesting that patients with prehypertension may benefit from blood pressure lowering drugs...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

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MONDAY, April 6, 2020 -- First-time mothers with preeclampsia are at a higher risk for adverse cardiovascular outcomes, including myocardial infarction, stroke, and cardiovascular death, according to a study recently published in the Journal of...
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
This study delves into the mechanisms by which a short period of fasting can accelerate wound healing. Fasting triggers many of the same cellular stress responses, such as upregulated autophagy, as occur during the practice of calorie restriction. It isn't exactly the same, however, so it is always worth asking whether any specific biochemistry observed in either case does in fact occur in both situations. In particular, the period of refeeding following fasting appears to have beneficial effects that are distinct from those that occur while food is restricted. Multiple forms of therapeutic fasting have been repor...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Based on reports from China, we know that most COVID-19 patients (about 80%) will develop mild flulike symptoms, including fever, dry cough, and body aches that can be managed at home. 20% will develop more serious symptoms, such as pneumonia requiring hospitalization, with about a quarter of these requiring ICU-level care. Initial reports focused on the respiratory effects of COVID-19, such as pneumonia and difficulty breathing. But more recent literature has described serious cardiovascular complications occurring in about 10% to 20% of hospitalized patients. Someone with pre-existing heart disease who becomes ill with C...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Infectious diseases Source Type: blogs
(American College of Cardiology) In a study with the longest follow-up to date of patients with a high-risk form of heart disease known as left main coronary artery disease (LMCAD), researchers found no significant differences in rates of death, heart attack or stroke between patients who were treated with a stent and those who underwent heart bypass surgery. The research was presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC).
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
When Dr. Mark Lewis has to tell a cancer patient they’re dying, he tries to do so as compassionately as possible, usually offering a hug or a hand to hold. The thought of doing so by phone, he says, once felt heartbreakingly impersonal. But in the face of the current COVID-19 pandemic, the Salt Lake City-based gastrointestinal oncologist has had to do many things that make his “conscience weigh heavy.” He’s delivered bad news virtually, to limit the possibility of spreading the virus. He’s delayed chemotherapy for patients who—he hopes—can wait, knowing the treatment would wipe out...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Magazine Source Type: news
(CNN) — Ending your day with a hot bath might have more benefits than just relaxation. It could also lower your risk of heart disease and stroke, a new study finds. Previous research on bathing has already shown that it’s beneficial for sleep quality and how healthy a person thinks they are. A new study, published Tuesday in the journal Heart, found that a daily hot bath is also associated with a 28% lower risk of heart disease, and a 26% lower risk of stroke — likely because taking a bath is also associated with lowering your blood pressure, the researchers said. They discovered this after tracking the b...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Source Type: news
Higher intake of isoflavones and tofu associated with moderately lower risk of developing CHD especially for some women Related items fromOnMedica Taxing unhealthy products may help tackle chronic diseases Most supplements offer no real benefit, some might increase risks Plant-based diet linked to lower risk of heart failure Vitamin D supplements do not confer cardiovascular protection Fish oils do not prevent heart attack or strokes with diabetes
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
RARITAN, N.J., March 20, 2020 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson &Johnson announced today that it will unveil late-breaking data from its leading cardiovascular and metabolism portfolio during the virtual American College of Cardiology’s 69th Annual Scientific Session together with the World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC) on March 28-30, 2020. Notably, four late-breaking abstracts for XARELTO® (rivaroxaban) will be presented, including data from the Phase 3 VOYAGER PAD study in patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD) after lower-extremity revascularization.Click to ...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
By KOUSIK KRISHNAN, MD As many industries and individuals are struggling publicly with burnout, a new study from the European Journal of Preventative Cardiology links the “burnout syndrome” with atrial fibrillation (afib). The findings are both interesting and valuable. In general, the public benefits from anything that can raise awareness of heart disease, because early intervention directly impacts improved patient outcomes. However, headlines that describe afib as a “deadly irregular heartbeat” go too far in the name of public awareness. The truth is,...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Medical Practice Patients afib atrial fibrillation cardiac care irregular heartbeat Kousik Krishnan Source Type: blogs
An American research team investigated the link between egg consumption and cases of CVD - including non-fatal heart attack, fatal coronary heart disease and stroke.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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