Listening with the Ears of the Heart

I am a privileged listener, like cab drivers, clergy, bartenders and hair stylists. My ability has been long-honed, as a career therapist with over 40 years under my belt. It started way before I set foot on campus in 1977 at Glassboro State College (now Rowan University) in Glassboro, NJ. I figure it began when I was a kid and my friends would come to me for advice. Back then, I didn’t have the benefit of the education to offer anything of substance. I did learn the art of nodding, smiling and saying, “um, hummm,” while I held space. Apparently, it was what they needed, since they kept coming back for more. It evolved into a desire to do it professionally, while as a high school student, I needed to figure out a career path to pursue. It wasn’t as if I had planned to be a social worker/psychotherapist. Back when I was growing up, most women I knew were teachers, nurses or clerical workers. My own mother was a switchboard operator at Sears for much of her working life during my childhood and into her retirement in 1989.   When I considered my talents, listening loomed large. Sitting at a desk and creating a safe container for clients while they unpacked their baggage accumulated over decades, felt like it would be rewarding. On any given day, I could be with those who are contemplating changing jobs, so I am offering career counseling. They may have lost a loved one, so I am doing grief counseling. They may be having flashbacks from PTSD, so...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Personal Professional Source Type: blogs

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The last man that used the words “I love you” used them to control me.  He used them by not saying it back, ever, when I said it.  He used them by smugly making me say it when he wanted to hear it.  He used them by only ever saying them himself when I would work up the strength to try to end things.   He used them to make me feel bad when I didn’t “behave” how he wanted me to.  He used them to convince me of a false future that he had no intention of ever providing.  The words “I love you” meant absolutely nothing. They were alternately a crowba...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Codependence Narcissism Personal Stories Relationships & Love Addiction Recovery Alcoholism Breakups Emotional Abuse Substance Abuse Source Type: news
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Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Exclusive Source Type: blogs
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Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Mental Health mental health costs mental health coverage mental illness opiate addiction opiates opioid opioid crisis opioids Source Type: blogs
Police officers are often the first responders when someone is having a mental illness crisis.  But are members of law enforcement properly equipped for this job?  There are plenty of horrifying stories that would indicate that the answer is “no.”  How do we change this?  Join us as Gabe speaks with Officer Rebecca Skillern from the Huston, Texas, Police Department about how Houston is training its officers to respond to these difficult calls. SUBSCRIBE &REVIEW   Guest information for ‘Policing and Crisis Intervention Training’ Podcast Episode   Officer Rebecca S...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Policy and Advocacy Relationships The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs
With the summer in full swing. Many of us are looking ahead to July 4th, planning time away from work and looking forward to a well needed break. For most Americans, Independence Day reflects a day of fun, having barbecues with close friends and family, eating wonderful food and rejoicing at night under the fireworks. For some Americans, however, fireworks and crowds are a major trigger for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, inducing flashbacks, hypervigilance and sweating, among other symptoms. While in the general population, approximately 7-8% of people have PTSD at some point in their lives, this number increases to 10% i...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General PTSD Self-Help Trauma 4th Of July Combat Veteran Fireworks Hypersensitivity triggers Source Type: blogs
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Source: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized onetime Research Source Type: news
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Source: The Neurocritic - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Source Type: blogs
What Causes Addiction? When someone is suffering from addiction, it is a very dark and lonely time. Not only because of the addiction they are suffering, but because of the pain of the underlying causes. All addiction stems from a root cause, making the addiction impossible to overcome unless that cause is treated as well. There can be many different root causes that the addiction is a symptom of, and all need to be treated with compassion and care. Co-Occuring Mental Health Disorders One of the major underlying causes of addiction is a co-occuring mental health disorder. Some of the mental health disorders that addiction ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Anxiety Depression Depression Treatment Mental Health PTSD Substance Abuse addiction treatment family root cause trauma underlying causes Source Type: blogs
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