The potential threat of avian influenza virus to horses - recalling the Chinese 1989-1990 equine influenza outbreaks

Recently, several studies in this journal have highlighted the threat of avian influenza virus (AIV) to humans, poultry, and other animals.1 –6 In equines, there was only one reported influenza outbreak caused by AIV, which occurred in 1989-1990 in China. However, AIV still poses a potential threat to equines.
Source: Journal of Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

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Source: BMC Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV health ideas Source Type: news
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Source: Veterinary Microbiology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized health ideas Source Type: news
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