New Urine Test Detects Onchocerciasis a Disease that Causes Blindness

Researchers develop urine diagnostic to detect parasitic worms that cause river blindness or onchocerciasis, a tropical disease that afflicts 18 - 120 million people worldwide
Source: Disabled World - Category: Disability Tags: Medical Research Source Type: news

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BACKGROUND: American Indians have excess risk of depression, which can contribute to cerebrovascular and cognitive disability, with effects on memory, processing speed, executive function, and visuospatial ability. However, studies examining depression and...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news
This study aimed to assess the costs, health status, and medical service satisfaction with Korean and conventional medicine use before and after surgery of patients visiting Korean medicine hospitals for postsurgical musculoskeletal pain. The study population comprised patients who visited KM hospitals for the first time between June and November 2017 for persistent or recurrent pain and discomfort after low back, neck, shoulder, or knee surgery. Various validated questionnaires were used to collect data. A total of 100 participants were enrolled, and the majority had undergone low back surgery (n = 82). The ...
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
Caregivers for people with special needs are reeling as the coronavirus preys on the most vulnerable.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Group Homes and Supportive Housing Disabilities Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Quarantines Nursing Homes Elderly AHRC New York City Disability Advocates Disability Rights New York Office for People With Developmental Disabilities (NYS) Bayvil Source Type: news
This study aimed to provide baseline information for future artemisinin surveillance by analyzing the k13-propeller domain in P. falciparum field isolates collected from 24 study areas in 14 malaria hot spots of Odisha (previously Orissa) during July 2018-January 2019. A total of 178 P. falciparum mono infections were assessed. An 849-base pair fragment encoding the Pfk13 propeller was amplified by nested polymerase chain reaction and sequenced in both directions (PCR). After DNA alignment with the 3D7 reference sequence, all samples were found to be wild type. It can be anticipated that malaria public health is not under ...
Source: Biomed Res - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Biomed Res Int Source Type: research
Conclusions: Despite the reduced proportion of night blindness and Bitot's spot, still both clinical and subclinical vitamin A deficiencies remain a public health problem in Ethiopia requiring strengthen intervention through the newly initiated health extension program. PMID: 32258145 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Biomed Res - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Biomed Res Int Source Type: research
Abstract Human onchocerciasis - commonly known as river blindness - is one of the most devastating yet neglected tropical diseases, leaving many millions in sub-Saharan Africa blind and/or with chronic disabilities. Attempts to eliminate onchocerciasis, primarily through the mass drug administration of ivermectin, remains challenging and has been heightened by the recent news that drug-resistant parasites are developing in some populations after years of drug treatment. Needed, and needed now, in the fight to eliminate onchocerciasis are new tools, such as preventive and therapeutic vaccines. This review summarize...
Source: Trends in Parasitology - Category: Parasitology Authors: Tags: Trends Parasitol Source Type: research
Between 1990 and 2013, thousands of children in war-torn South Sudan and northern Uganda suddenly developed a severe and puzzling form of epilepsy. When exposed to food or cold temperatures, affected children nodded their heads uncontrollably. Over time the seizures often worsened, leaving the children severely disabled. Many died of malnutrition, accidents, or secondary infections. The outbreak triggered an intense hunt for the cause, but searches for viruses, bacteria, environmental toxins, genetic factors, and nutritional deficits all came up empty. One key clue: Areas with nodding disease also had high rates of infecti...
Source: ScienceNOW - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Neglected Diseases Source Type: news
This article is part HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to eliminate them. More than 1 billion people on the planet suffer from illnesses that the world pays little attention to. Neglected tropical diseases are a group of at least 18 diseases that primarily affect people living in poverty in tropical regions of the world and are virtually unknown elsewhere, according to the World Health Organization. These are diseases like river blindness, which has infected 18 million people worldwide and caused blindness in 270,000 people; or...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
WASHINGTON (AP) — Prick a finger and have the blood checked for parasites — by smartphone? Scientists are turning those ubiquitous phones into microscopes and other medical tools that could help fight diseases in remote parts of the world. In the newest work, University of California, Berkeley, researchers used a smartphone-run video microscope to target a challenge in parts of Central Africa — some devastating infections caused by tiny parasitic worms. A small pilot study in Cameroon showed the device could measure within minutes certain worms wriggling in a finger-prick of blood, rapidly identifying wh...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
Conclusion This study suggests a new smartphone-based approach could provide a quick way of measuring levels of infection with the Loa loa worm in blood samples, and with a high level of accuracy. This technique could allow assessment of people's infection in communities without easy access to the laboratory testing that is usually used to detect the worms. This is important, as people with high levels of this infection can suffer potentially fatal side effects with the drug ivermectin, which is used to treat two other parasitic infections. It's worth bearing in mind that this was a pilot study in only 33 people using a ...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Source Type: news
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