Mindfulness Versus Microdosing: Get High on Being Present

Microdosing has become very popular, and many people believe it’s a life changer. It involves taking a small amount — a fraction of a dose — of a hallucinogenic drug to achieve psychological benefits while minimizing any undesirable side effects. Most microdosers ingest LSD (lysergic acid diethyl amide) or mushrooms (psilocybin), which are psychedelics that can create profoundly intensified sensory perception. These drugs became popular in the 1960s and ’70s, and for anyone who used them then, they too espoused the drugs’ mind-altering effects. The difference back then was that people weren’t microdosing, but experiencing full-blown hallucinogenic trips, which lasted anywhere from 6 to 15 hours. But now, most users take small amounts of the powerful drugs, like LSD, to minimize any undesirable mind-altering side effects. More people are turning on by taking microdoses and, reportedly, some Silicon Valley engineers are even microdosing LSD as an alternative to Adderall to increase focus and attention. Regardless of what your jam is for keeping yourself “turned on and tuned in,” as Harvard psychology professor and psychedelics pioneer Dr. Timothy Leary once said, psychedelic drugs have been found to treat mental illness by profoundly changing neurological pathways that keep people stuck in unhealthy thought patterns. Leary discovered these benefits more than 50 years ago, but the stigma associated with LSD and other hallucinogens...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction Medications Mindfulness Hallucinogens LSD lysergic acid microdose psilocybin Source Type: blogs

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The global novel coronavirus pandemic afflicting everyone is showing mixed signs of activity. In some countries it appears to be easing, while in others it appears to be experiencing a resurgence. It’s not at all clear when the pandemic will end, but it’s unlikely to do so before 2021. What has become increasingly clear is that the toll of the pandemic will impact more than the people who come down with COVID-19. The mental health impact of living with a pandemic is being mostly ignored — for now. But as the deaths continue to rise, we need to pay close attention to the cost of the pandemic’s reperc...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Grief and Loss Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy coronavirus COVID-19 Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: In the long run, this tragic health crisis should significantly enhance our understanding of the mental health risk factors among the health care professionals facing the COVID-19 pandemic. Reporting information such as this is essential to plan future prevention strategies. Protecting health care professionals is indeed an important component of public health measures to address large-scale health crisis. Thus, interventions to promote mental well-being in health care professionals exposed to COVID-19 need to be immediately implemented, and to strengthen prevention and response strategies by training health c...
Source: L Encephale - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Encephale Source Type: research
Authors: Mengin A, Allé MC, Rolling J, Ligier F, Schroder C, Lalanne L, Berna F, Jardri R, Vaiva G, Geoffroy PA, Brunault P, Thibaut F, Chevance A, Giersch A Abstract The psychological effects of isolation have already been described in the literature (polar expeditions, submarines, prison). Nevertheless, the scale of confinement implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic is unprecedented. In addition to reviewing the published studies, we need to anticipate the psychological problems that could arise during or at a distance from confinement. We have gone beyond the COVID-19 literature in order to examine the ...
Source: L Encephale - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Encephale Source Type: research
Abstract Pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) was originally isolated from the hypothalamus and found to stimulate adenylyl cyclase in the pituitary. Later studies showed that this peptide and its receptors (PAC1, VPAC1, and VPAC2) are widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). Consistent with its distribution in the CNS, the PACAP/PAC1 receptor system is involved in several physiological responses, such as mediation of the stress response, modulation of nociception, regulation of prolactin release, food intake, etc. This system is also implicated in different pathological states, e...
Source: Neuropharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Neuropharmacology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Overall, our findings indicate that bodily pain is longitudinally associated with NMUPD among male soldiers, but not with illicit drugs. Significantly, our results stem from a non-clinical sample of soldiers with overall lower levels of pain. This indicates that pain may be important, even at lower levels, and underscores the importance of early non-pharmacologic interventions for pain. PMID: 32315933 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Addictive Behaviors - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addict Behav Source Type: research
Most of us have never before experienced enforced self-isolation and lockdown. What can we learn from people who have voluntarily gone into isolation for prolonged periods of time? A group of people who self-isolate regularly are meditators, be it monks spending years in caves or laypersons going to silent retreats. Although there are big differences between meditation retreats and lockdowns, we can learn much from linking the two. When people begin and end meditation retreats, they often have trouble adjusting. Many experience alienation from everyday life, and some struggle with their changed role or idea of self.1 Going...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Anxiety Coronavirus General Loneliness Relaxation and Meditation COVID-19 Mindfulness pandemic Source Type: news
Men and women experience schizophrenia differently; from the age of onset to symptoms and how society treats those with mental disorders.  Schizophrenic, Rachel Star Withers and co-host Gabe Howard continue the discussion of the differences from the last episode but change the focus to men.  Jason Jepson, an author who has schizophrenia joins for a man’s perspective and Dr. Hayden Finch returns to explain the clinical side of the issues. Highlights in “Schizophrenia in Men” Episode [01:30] Age of onset [04:00] Symptoms in men vs women [05:00] Interview with Jason Jepson [07:30] Jason discusses ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Inside Schizophrenia Men's Issues Psychiatry Psychology Living With Schizophrenia Mental Disorder Mental Health Mental Illness Symptoms Of Schizophrenia Source Type: blogs
Saying ‘calm down’ totally calmed me down, thank you so much – said no one ever. Just like in the case of anger- suggesting taking it easy doesn’t help people suffering from anxiety either. It can even make people feel more separated and lonelier than before. They may feel their loved ones don’t understand them and that’s a stress factor for everyone. So, is there a better, modern way to manage anxiety? This would be a short and sad article if there wasn’t – so here is the good news: there sure is… Source: uniquemindcare.com Let’s see some facts Anxiety ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers digital health e-patient ecg VR meditation telemedicine mental health mental wellbeing stress management anxiety cyberchondria Source Type: blogs
Across the landscape of mental health research and diagnosis, there is a diverse range of questionnaires and interviews available for use by clinicians and researchers to determine patient treatment plans or investigate internal and external etiologies. Although individually, these tools have each been assessed for their validity and reliability, there is little research examining the consistency between them in terms of what symptoms they assess, and how they assess those symptoms. Here, we provide an analysis of 126 different questionnaires and interviews commonly used to diagnose and screen for 10 different disorder typ...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Randomized clinical trials support the efficacy of MDMA in the treatment of PTSD and psilocybin in the treatment of depression and cancer-related anxiety. The research to support the use of LSD and ayahuasca in the treatment of psychiatric disorders is preliminary, although promising. Overall, the database is insufficient for FDA approval of any psychedelic compound for routine clinical use in psychiatric disorders at this time, but continued research on the efficacy of psychedelics for the treatment of psychiatric disorders is warranted. PMID: 32098487 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The American Journal of Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Am J Psychiatry Source Type: research
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