Variability in the immune system: of vaccine responses and immune states.

Variability in the immune system: of vaccine responses and immune states. Curr Opin Immunol. 2013 Aug 13; Authors: Shen-Orr SS, Furman D Abstract System-wide approaches are now being applied to study vaccine responses, whose mechanisms of action, and failure, are not well understood. These works have repeatedly shown vaccine response to be an orchestrated process involving multiple arms of immunity most noticeable sensing and innate components. Prediction of vaccine responses based on system-wide measures is achievable, but challenges remain for robust population wide predictions based only on pre-vaccination measures, especially in partially efficacious vaccines such as influenza. This is especially true in older adults, who are often less responsive to vaccination and exhibit high level of variation compared to young in many components of immunity. Despite this increase in variation, most of the studies on aging use group averages of immune phenotypes to model immune system behavior. Using systems approaches, it is possible to exploit this variation to form distinguishable clusters of phenotypes within and across individuals to discover underlying immune states. PMID: 23953808 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Opinion in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Curr Opin Immunol Source Type: research

Related Links:

Publication date: Available online 20 February 2020Source: The Lancet Global HealthAuthor(s): Xin Wang, You Li, Katherine L O'Brien, Shabir A Madhi, Marc-Alain Widdowson, Peter Byass, Saad B Omer, Qalab Abbas, Asad Ali, Alberta Amu, Eduardo Azziz-Baumgartner, Quique Bassat, W Abdullah Brooks, Sandra S Chaves, Alexandria Chung, Cheryl Cohen, Marcela Echavarria, Rodrigo A Fasce, Angela Gentile, Aubree GordonSummaryBackgroundSeasonal influenza virus is a common cause of acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) in young children. In 2008, we estimated that 20 million influenza-virus-associated ALRI and 1 million influenza-viru...
Source: The Lancet Global Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
AbstractWhen deciding whether to vaccinate, people often seek information through consequential processes that are not currently well understood. A survey of a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults (N = 2,091) explored the factors associated with intentions to seek influenza vaccine information in the 2018 –2019 influenza season. This survey shed light on what motivates intentions to seek information about the influenza vaccine through the lens of the risk information seeking and processing (RISP) model. The model explained information‐seeking intentions well among both unvaccinated and vaccinated respond...
Source: Risk Analysis - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Original Research Article Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: A historical anchor for vaccination rates and ILI is provided in a large cohort of college students following the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. Influenza immunization locations were determined, as was self-reported obstacles to receiving vaccinations. These are important results for public health leaders seeking to increase vaccination rates during future influenza seasons. PMID: 32074350 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Military Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Mil Med Source Type: research
Preliminary estimates show influenza vaccine effectiveness for 2019-2020 was 55% in children and 45% overall, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news
, Flannery B Abstract During the 2019-20 influenza season, influenza-like illness (ILI)* activity first exceeded the national baseline during the week ending November 9, 2019, signaling the earliest start to the influenza season since the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic. Activity remains elevated as of mid-February 2020. In the United States, annual vaccination against seasonal influenza is recommended for all persons aged ≥6 months (1). During each influenza season, CDC estimates seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness in preventing laboratory-confirmed influenza associated with medically attended acute respi...
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep Source Type: research
TTP, a technology company based in Melbourn, UK, is developing a handheld PCR (polymerase chain reaction) diagnostic device that can rapidly detect influenza viruses, and one day other viruses, in samples of nasal mucus. The company claims that the s...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Diagnostics Exclusive Public Health Source Type: blogs
THURSDAY, Feb. 20, 2020 -- The overall vaccine effectiveness (VE) against any influenza virus associated with medically attended acute respiratory illness (ARI) is 45 percent for the current influenza season, according to research published in the...
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
(NEW YORK) — It may end up being a bad flu season for kids, but early signs suggest the vaccine is working OK. The vaccine has been more than 50% effective in preventing flu illness severe enough to send a child to the doctor’s office, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday. Health experts consider that pretty good. The vaccines are made each year to protect against three or four different kinds of flu virus. The ingredients are based on predictions of what strains will make people sick the following winter. It doesn’t always work out. This flu season has featured two waves, ea...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized influenza onetime Source Type: news
CDC preliminary vaccine effectiveness estimates show 2019-20 influenza vaccines providing substantial protective benefit, particularly among children, who have been hard hit by influenza this season. Influenza vaccines are reducing the risk for having to go to the doctor with influenza illness by 45% overall and by 55% in children.
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - Category: American Health Tags: Children's Health Influenza (Flu) MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Vaccines Source Type: news
Review (6 cohort studies, n=179,158) found influenza vaccination was associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality (HR=0.83; 95%CI 0.76 to 0.91; I2=75%). However, evidence statements are based on very low grade quality evidence.
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
More News: Allergy & Immunology | Influenza | Influenza Vaccine | Study | Vaccines