Poor Sleep Tied to Heart Disease and Stroke

Being an early bird, sleeping seven to eight hours a night, having no insomnia, not snoring and not being sleepy during the day were tied to better cardiovascular health.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Sleep Heart Genetics and Heredity Stroke Source Type: news

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Authors: Chung S, Cho SW, Jo MW, Youn S, Lee J, Sim CS Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to estimate the progress of insomnia prevalence and incidence over the past several years. Also, this study compared survival rates between individuals with and without insomnia. METHODS: The National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort (NHIS-NSC) from 2002-2013 was used for this study. Prevalent cases of insomnia were defined using ICD-10 codes F51.0 or G47.0, or a prescription of sedatives. Cox's proportional hazard analysis was conducted to compare survival rates between insomnia patients and peop...
Source: Psychiatry Investigation - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Psychiatry Investig Source Type: research
Amita Sehgal, whose pioneering discoveries of mechanisms that regulate circadian rhythms and sleep have deepened scientists ’ understanding of behavioral cycles, metabolism and healthy aging, has been named the 2020 recipient of the Switzer Prize awarded by the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.“I am deeply honored to be selected and to be among the distinguished group of scientists who received this influential prize before me,” said Sehgal, who is the John Herr Musser Professor of Neuroscience at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and director of the C...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
This study aimed to explore how adolescents in Indonesia (a populous and rapidly developing country) conceptualise mental health and what they identify as important determinants. Eight focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted with 86 Indonesian adolescents (aged 16-18 years), sampled from schools and community settings from Jakarta and South Sulawesi. FGDs were recorded, transcribed, translated and thematically analysed. Mental health was recognised as a significant concern by adolescents in Indonesia. Good mental health was conceptualised as emotional wellbeing and happiness. By contrast, poor mental health was predo...
Source: Asian Journal of Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Asian J Psychiatr Source Type: research
Source: BMJ Comments - Category: General Medicine Source Type: forums
CONCLUSION: This study describes the current status of acute stroke care in Korea. Despite quite acceptable quality of stroke care, it suggests regional and hospital disparities. Expansion of stroke units, stroke center certification or accreditation, and connections between stroke centers and emergency medical services are highly recommended. PMID: 32449325 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of Korean Medical Science - Category: Biomedical Science Tags: J Korean Med Sci Source Type: research
ConclusionThe LAT endotype is common among veterans with PTSD. An improved understanding of how insomnia in this population affects CPAP utilization would be instrumental in designing targeted therapy to improve sleep quality.
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
Sleep disturbances such as insomnia are extremely common, especially in women after menopause. According to data from the National Institutes of Health, sleep disturbance varies from 16% to 42% before menopause, from 39% to 47% during perimenopause, and from 35% to 60% after menopause. Insomnia is a serious medical problem defined by frequent difficulty falling or staying asleep that impacts a person’s life in a negative way. Hormone changes around menopause can lead to sleep problems for many reasons, including changing sleep requirements, increased irritability, and hot flashes. What menopausal women eat could have...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Fatigue Food as medicine Healthy Eating Menopause Nutrition Sleep Source Type: blogs
(CNN) — Hey, sleepyheads. What you believe about sleep may be nothing but a pipe dream. Many of us have notions about sleep that have little basis in fact and may even be harmful to our health, according to researchers at NYU Langone Health’s School of Medicine, who conducted a study published Tuesday in the journal Sleep Health. “There’s such a link between good sleep and our waking success,” said lead study investigator Rebecca Robbins, a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Population Health at NYU Langone Health. “And yet we often find ourselves debunking myths, whether ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Healthwatch News CNN Sleep Source Type: news
You're reading Does Snoring Have Any Health Risks?, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. For a long time, people have categorized snoring as simply a minor health condition that will go away on its own. However, modern research has declared that snoring is not only irritation to the ears and to peaceful sleep but an indication of a number of complaints in your body. People who are overweight, who are regular smokers or have high cholesterol are prone to snoring, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). OSA is defi...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: featured health and fitness self improvement bodyweight health warnings illness pickthebrain sleep disorder snoring stop snoring Source Type: blogs
When I began writing in this spot three years ago, the headline of my very first entry was, "Getting Enough Sleep Is Smart, Not Selfish." That post went up at a time when Americans were beginning to focus more on a good night's rest. The subject came into a sharper focus, in part, because wearable technology gave us some specifics. Forget the anecdotal evidence of whether we slept well; with the touch of a button, we could know what time we fell asleep, how long we were out and how often our sleep was interrupted. The study of sleep -- and conversations around it -- began gaining traction. Among those paying ke...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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