Visual aids for pediatric airway management.

Visual aids for pediatric airway management. Paediatr Anaesth. 2019 Dec 16;: Authors: Frykholm P Abstract Four basic types of visual aids are used for teaching airway management and decision-making in simulated as well as in real clinical situations: universal algorithms, sets of limited algorithms, concept-based cognitive aids and checklists. The first three may represent an evolution in the understanding of the role of human error in both successful and failed airway management. Complex visual aids such as the American Society of Anesthesiology difficult airway algorithm may be more useful for teaching, while graphic cognitive aids like the Vortex may be more helpful for decision-making under stress. Not surprisingly, there is a lack of outcome studies, although some cognitive aids have been evaluated in simulation settings. PMID: 31841250 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Paediatric Anaesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Paediatr Anaesth Source Type: research

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Conclusions Medical students perform better in a simulated airway crisis after training in the simpler Vortex approach to guide decision-making. Students in the ASA group had task load scores indicative of high cognitive load.
Source: Simulation in Healthcare: The Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare - Category: Medical Devices Tags: Empirical Investigations Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 23 June 2018Source: Anaesthesia &Intensive Care MedicineAuthor(s): Andrew Laurie, Jamie MacdonaldAbstractAirway management provides gas exchange, protects the lungs from injury and permits treatment. This requires safe, effective and reliable use of equipment, often in combination. A management plan with backups is essential, but a sequence of logical plans forming an airway management strategy is better. Correct equipment use needs correct knowledge, skill and attitudes. There are five approaches to airway management in which equipment is used: facemask ventilation with adjuncts, use...
Source: Anaesthesia and intensive care medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
Every minute spent without treatment could reduce the chance of survival in case of medical emergency and trauma patients. Digital health innovations making patients the point-of-care could become a great help for first responders and emergency units in the battle against time. Here, we collected what trends and technologies will have an impact on the future of emergency medicine. Six minutes before brain damage Car crashes, home injuries, fires, natural disasters. The difference between life and death often depends on the speed and efficiency of emergency care services. The work of doctors, paramedics, and nurses being in...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: imported CPR digital health emergency emergency medicine EMS first aid first response future Health 2.0 Healthcare Innovation technology Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: This analysis points to the need for systemwide implementation of human factors engineering-based approaches to work toward further eliminating anesthesia-related adverse events. Such actions include standardization of processes, forcing functions, separating storage of look-alike sound-alike medications, limiting stock of high-risk medication strengths, bar coding medications, use of cognitive aids such as checklists, and high-fidelity simulation. PMID: 28678068 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Anesthesia and Analgesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Anesth Analg Source Type: research
Sheila Nainan Myatra, Syed Moied Ahmed, Pankaj Kundra, Rakesh Garg, Venkateswaran Ramkumar, Apeksh Patwa, Amit Shah, Ubaradka S Raveendra, Sumalatha Radhakrishna Shetty, Jeson Rajan Doctor, Dilip K Pawar, Singaravelu Ramesh, Sabyasachi Das, Jigeeshu Vasishtha DivatiaIndian Journal of Critical Care Medicine 2017 21(3):146-153Tracheal intubation (TI) is a routine procedure in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and is often lifesaving. In contrast to the controlled conditions in the operating room, critically ill patients with respiratory failure and shock are physiologically unstable. These factors, along with under evaluation of...
Source: Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine - Category: Intensive Care Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 6 March 2017 Source:Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine Author(s): Karen McCluskey, Miriam Stephens Conventional direct laryngoscopy with the curved Macintosh blade is a fundamental skill for all anaesthetists and has been the cornerstone of airway management for many years. This technique relies on the operator aligning the oro-pharyngo-laryngeal structures and inserting an endotracheal tube into the trachea under direct vision. There is a recognized failure rate with this technique and thus alternative techniques for tracheal intubation should be available for use in difficult si...
Source: Anaesthesia and intensive care medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
Sheila Nainan Myatra, Syed Moied Ahmed, Pankaj Kundra, Rakesh Garg, Venkateswaran Ramkumar, Apeksh Patwa, Amit Shah, Ubaradka S Raveendra, Sumalatha Radhakrishna Shetty, Jeson Rajan Doctor, Dilip K Pawar, Singaravelu Ramesh, Sabyasachi Das, Jigeeshu Vasishtha DivatiaIndian Journal of Anaesthesia 2016 60(12):922-930Tracheal intubation (TI) is a routine procedure in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and is often life-saving. In contrast to the controlled conditions in the operating room, critically ill patients with respiratory failure and shock are physiologically unstable. These factors, along with a suboptimal evaluation of t...
Source: Indian Journal of Anaesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract Tracheal tube introducers and stylets are highly successful devices for the management of various airway scenarios. Their first-line use is advocated in many difficult airway algorithms. Although they have been used for decades, the shape and design of introducers and stylets as well as their patterns of use are constantly evolving. Our purpose is to provide the clinician with an update on these different devices. We performed a systematic literature search from 2005 until May 2015, without language restrictions. The two authors independently retrieved all studies with the keywords “bougie”, &...
Source: Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing - Category: Information Technology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 20 July 2015 Source:Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine Author(s): David R. Ball Airway management provides gas exchange, protects the lungs from injury and permits treatment. This requires safe, effective and reliable use of equipment, often in combination. A management plan with backup plans is essential, but a sequence of logical plans forming an airway management strategy is better. Correct equipment use needs correct knowledge, skill and attitudes. There are five approaches to airway management in which equipment is used: facemask ventilation with adjuncts, airway clearance ...
Source: Anaesthesia and intensive care medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 10 July 2015 Source:Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine Author(s): David Leslie , Stephen Froom , Christopher Gildersleve There have been considerable developments in the equipment and monitoring available for paediatric anaesthesia over the past 3 years. Advances in airway management have come about primarily through the increased use of videolaryngoscopes. Numerous second-generation supraglottic airway devices are also now available with features aimed at improving both their safety profile and utility during difficult airway management. Concerns surrounding the endocrine effect...
Source: Anaesthesia and intensive care medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
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