Losing Weight May Reduce Your Risk of Breast Cancer

Excess body weight is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Research suggests that’s because too much body fat can elevate levels of sex hormones like estrogen, especially among postmenopausal women. But despite knowing there is a correlation between extra weight and breast cancer, it’s been difficult to study how losing that weight could affect an individual woman’s chance of developing cancer. Now, a new paper published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute provides encouraging evidence that, for women 50 and older, virtually any amount of sustained weight loss translates to a reduction in breast cancer risk. “We’re so thankful to be able to say it’s not too late to lower your risk if you’ve previously gained weight, even after age 50,” says study co-author Lauren Teras, scientific director of epidemiology research at the American Cancer Society. The research drew on data collected through the Pooling Project of Prospective Studies of Diet and Cancer, an international set of studies that seeks to elucidate the relationship between diet and cancer among women without a history of the disease. For the new paper, researchers used data from about 180,000 women living in the U.S., Australia and Asia, all of whom were 50 or older and cancer-free when the studies began. Each woman also provided researchers with data about her weight and body mass index, as well as lifestyle and demographic characteristics. The rese...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Cancer embargoed study Source Type: news

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Authors: Nieder C, Dalhaug A, Haukland E Abstract Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy, in terms of overall survival, of sequential systemic therapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (MCRPC) who lived in Nordland County, Norway, a large region with a challenging geography, yet only one department of oncology located in the main city, Bodø.Patients and methods: Overall 77 patients who had received at least 2 lines of treatment were included in this retrospective study.Results: Management included docetaxel in 69 patients (90%), often prescribed...
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Scand J Urol Source Type: research
Szpakowska M Abstract Chemokines regulate directed cell migration, proliferation and survival and are key components in cancer biology. They exert their functions by interacting with seven-transmembrane domain receptors that signal through G proteins (GPCRs). A subgroup of four chemokine receptors known as the atypical chemokine receptors (ACKRs) has emerged as essential regulators of the chemokine functions. ACKRs play diverse and complex roles in tumor biology from tumor initiation to metastasis, including cancer cell proliferation, adherence to endothelium, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), extravasatio...
Source: Advances in Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Adv Cancer Res Source Type: research
Abstract As basic research into GPCR signaling and its association with disease has come into fruition, greater clarity has emerged with regards to how these receptors may be amenable to therapeutic intervention. As a diverse group of receptor proteins, which regulate a variety of intracellular signaling pathways, research in this area has been slow to yield tangible therapeutic agents for the treatment of a number of diseases including cancer. However, recently such research has gained momentum based on a series of studies that have sought to define GPCR proteins dynamics through the elucidation of their crystal ...
Source: Advances in Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Adv Cancer Res Source Type: research
Abstract The G coupled protein receptor CC chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) has the unusual characteristic in humans of being a developmentally non-essential gene that participates in several pathological processes including infection with HIV (Dean et al., 1996; Gupta et al., 2019; Samson et al., 1996), progression of stroke (Joy et al., 2019), osteoporosis (Xie et al., 2019) and the metastasis of cancer (Jiao et al., 2018; Velasco-Velazquez et al., 2012, 2014) (Reviewed in: Jiao, Nawab, et al., 2019; Jiao, Wang, &Pestell, 2019). The importance of CCR5 in HIV led to recent genetic engineering of humans to rec...
Source: Advances in Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Adv Cancer Res Source Type: research
Structure and function of β-arrestins, their emerging role in breast cancer, and potential opportunities for therapeutic manipulation. Adv Cancer Res. 2020;145:139-156 Authors: Shukla AK, Dwivedi-Agnihotri H Abstract β-Arrestins (βarrs) are multifunctional intracellular proteins with an ability to directly interact with a large number of cellular partners including the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). βarrs contribute to multiple aspects of GPCR signaling, trafficking and downregulation. Considering the central involvement of GPCR signaling in the onset and progression of diver...
Source: Advances in Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Adv Cancer Res Source Type: research
In conclusion, this study suggests that epigenetic age acceleration is significantly associated with lung function in women older than 50 years. We hypothesised that this could be due to menopause. However, we have observed that menopause has minimal effect and therefore there is possibility of other unknown physiological factors at older age in females mediating the epigenetic age acceleration effect on lung function. While, it is still unknown what exactly epigenetic aging from DNA methylation measures, this study suggests it can be utilised as one of the important factors to assess women's lung health in old age. DNA me...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Very often I encounter women who are far more worried about breast cancer than they are about heart disease. But women have a greater risk of dying from heart disease than from all cancers combined. This is true for women of all races and ethnicities. Yet only about 50% of women realize that they are at greater risk from heart disease than from anything else. Currently in the US, three million women are living with breast cancer, which causes one in 31 deaths. Almost 50 million women have cardiovascular disease, which encompasses heart disease and strokes and causes one in three deaths. Here’s what’s reall...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Breast Cancer Exercise and Fitness Health Healthy Eating Heart Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
By now, most people have been to a holiday party or two. Lots of food, lots of eggnog and other carb laden alcoholic beverages, and lots of grazing all day long on all the boxes of candy friends and business acquaintances sent to us. It's easy to gain the five pounds most people gain during the holidays, and in the process, raise your blood sugar or glucose levels too high. That's your body letting you know you have prediabetes (higher than normal but still below diabetes levels) or diabetes, and unless you take action soon, your body won't like it. Diabetes silently sneaks up on you and if untreated, slowly weakens your ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
By Stacy SimonManaging weight is a challenge for most people in the US. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 70% of American adults are overweight.This puts them at higher risk for serious conditions including diabetes, heart disease, and some types of cancer. For women, being overweight or obese after menopause increases the risk of breast cancer.The female hormone estrogen can help breast cancer grow. After menopause, most of your estrogen comes from fat tissue. Having more fat tissue can increase your chance of getting breast cancer by raising estrogen levels. Also, women...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Breast Cancer Diet/Exercise/Weight Source Type: news
ConclusionThis large and long-term cohort study showed that women with the top fifth highest average fibre intake during adolescence and early adulthood were around 25% less likely to develop premenopausal breast cancer decades later than those in the bottom fifth.This raises the suggestion that young women might be able to significantly lower their risk of breast cancer – the most common cancer in the UK – simply through eating more high-fibre foods such as fruits and vegetables.However, it’s worth noting a few points before accepting these promising results at face value. Total dieta...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Food/diet Source Type: news
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