Clinical Practice Guideline to Improve Locomotor Function Following Chronic Stroke, Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury, and Brain Injury.

DISCUSSION: The collective findings suggest that large amounts of task-specific (ie, locomotor) practice may be critical for improvements in walking function, although only at higher cardiovascular intensities or with augmented feedback to increase patient's engagement. Lower-intensity walking interventions or impairment-based training strategies demonstrated equivocal or limited efficacy. LIMITATIONS: As walking speed and distance were primary outcomes, the research participants included in the studies walked without substantial physical assistance. This guideline may not apply to patients with limited ambulatory function, where provision of walking training may require substantial physical assistance. SUMMARY: The guideline suggests that task-specific walking training should be performed to improve walking speed and distance in those with acute-onset CNS injury although only at higher intensities or with augmented feedback. Future studies should clarify the potential utility of specific training parameters that lead to improved walking speed and distance in these populations in both chronic and subacute stages following injury. DISCLAIMER: These recommendations are intended as a guide for clinicians to optimize rehabilitation outcomes for persons with chronic stroke, incomplete spinal cord injury, and traumatic brain injury to improve walking speed and distance. PMID: 31834165 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Physical Therapy - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Tags: J Neurol Phys Ther Source Type: research

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Discussion: The collective findings suggest that large amounts of task-specific (ie, locomotor) practice may be critical for improvements in walking function, although only at higher cardiovascular intensities or with augmented feedback to increase patient's engagement. Lower-intensity walking interventions or impairment-based training strategies demonstrated equivocal or limited efficacy. Limitations: As walking speed and distance were primary outcomes, the research participants included in the studies walked without substantial physical assistance. This guideline may not apply to patients with limited ambulatory fun...
Source: Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy - Category: Physiotherapy Tags: Clinical Practice Guidelines Source Type: research
This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board at the University of Minnesota. Study Design This study was part of a previously published randomized controlled trial (NCT02250092) designed to detect differences in hand function as a result of the intervention (Gillick et al., 2018b) Participants were evaluated within 11 days prior to (Pre-test, average 5 days between Pre-test and intervention), within 5 days after (Post-test, average 2 days between intervention and Post-test), and 6-months after Follow-up average 173 (days between intervention and Follow-up) the intervention. After enrolling, participants were...
Source: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
When someone suffers a stroke, he or she often loses some mobility, and some 60 percent of survivors are left with lower-limb deficits. “They usually have one leg that's more impaired than the other leg, and then they undergo rehabilitation and physical therapy. And often they don't fully recover,” said Conor Walsh, professor of engineering and applied sciences at the John A. Paulson Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and a core faculty member at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, in an interview with MD+DI. But a new device called ReSto...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Design Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 5 November 2018Source: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation MedicineAuthor(s): Yi Zhu, Yujie Yang, Jianan LiAbstractSpasticity is a motor disorder encountered after upper motor neuron lesions. It adversely affects quality of life in most patients and causes long-term burden of care and has significant financial implications. The effect of conventional therapies for spasticity including physical therapy, surgery, and pharmacotherapy are not always satisfying because of the short-term effects or side effects in some patients. Acupuncture is a part of traditional medicine originating from C...
Source: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine - Category: Rehabilitation Source Type: research
Medline has acquired physical therapy and rehabilitation equipment maker NeuroGym Technologies of Ottawa. NeuroGym’s equipment is designed for people who have had a stroke or other traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, chronic neurological conditions such as multiple sclerosis, balance issues and/or the need for fall prevention therapy. The equipment requires the patient to initiate movement, which the company says can help rewire the brain and speed recovery. It includes a sit-to-stand trainer, bungee mobility trainer to re-teach walking and improve balance, a pendulum stepper for lower extremit...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Blog Source Type: news
ius A Abstract BACKGROUND: Integration of the verticalization robot, Erigo, with functional electric stimulation and passive leg movements in the postacute rehabilitation of neurological patients could reduce the risk of secondary complications and improve functional outcomes (i.e. orthostatic hypotension, postural control and walking ability). OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to estimate and quantify changes in the postacute stage, mainly related to heart rate and blood pressure in functional recovery, postural parameters, walking ability and psychoemotional reactions, during training using the verticali...
Source: Technology and Health Care - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Technol Health Care Source Type: research
Not only the experience of sporting activities and events, but also rehabilitation after sports injuries are changing due to cutting-edge technologies. In sports medicine, the future holds a shift towards prevention through genomics, nutrigenomics, countless trackers, and wearables, while there are many great technologies which aim to alleviate the pain and shorten the time of recovery – if, against all odds, a sports injury still happens. Technology will change the experience of sports injuries and rehabilitation When was the last time you went out for a run without Endomondo or had a bike tour without Strava? Have ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine AR exoskeleton genomics health sensors Healthcare nutrigenomics prevention rehabilitation sports sports medicine trackers virtual reality VR wearables Source Type: blogs
by Jessica Robinson-Papp, MD, MS; Mary Catherine George, MM, PhD; Alexandra Nmashie, MD; Donald Weisz, PhD; and David M. Simpson, MD Drs. Robinson-Papp, George, Nmashie and Simpson are with the Department of Neurology and Dr. Weisz is with the Department of Neurosurgery—all from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York, New York. Innov Clin Neurosci. 2017;15(1–2):28–32 FUNDING: This investigator-initiated project was supported by a grant from CSL Behring. The project was also supported by Grant Number #UL1TR000067 from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), a comp...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Assessment Tools Current Issue Demyelinating Disease Movement Disorders Neurodegenerative Disease Neurology Original Research Primary Care Technology Trial Methodology Dynamometry human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) intravenous immu Source Type: research
If you measure your daily step count or raise a virtual plant to drink more water a day, you already fell victim of the charms of gamification. Is it bad news? On the contrary! Gamified apps, devices, and therapies will gradually appear in every field of healthcare making behavior change easier and more fun. Here are the greatest examples of gamification! Why is it so hard to change? Sequin dresses, champagne and smiling faces counting down to the new year. Some kisses here and some resolutions there. This time, Samantha thought everything will be different. She made a resolution every year to change her lifestyle into som...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers Healthcare Design Mobile Health diabetes Education future games gamification gc3 Innovation Medicine Personalized medicine technology wearable wearables Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: Use of these devices is limited by insufficient data, cost, and in some cases size of the machine. However, robotic technology is likely to become more prevalent as these machines are enhanced and able to produce targeted physical rehabilitation. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE: Therapists should be aware of these technologies as they continue to advance but understand the limitations and challenges posed with therapeutic/mobility robots. PMID: 28654477 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Physical Therapy - Category: Physiotherapy Authors: Tags: Pediatr Phys Ther Source Type: research
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