Magnetic resonance imaging and micro-computed tomography reveal brain morphological abnormalities in a mouse model of early moderate prenatal ethanol exposure

This study investigated the effects of early moderate prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) on the brain in a mouse model that mimics a scenario in humans, whereby moderate daily drinking ceases after a woman becomes aware of her pregnancy.MethodsC57BL/6 J pregnant mice were given 10% v/v ethanol from gestational day 0–8 in the drinking water. The male offspring were used for imaging. Anatomical and diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging were performed in vivo at postnatal day 28 (P28, adolescence) and P80 (adulthood). Micro-Computed Tomography was performed on fixed whole heads at P80. Tensor-based morphometry (TBM) was applied to detect alterations in brain structure and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) for skull morphology. Diffusion tensor and neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging models were used to detect microstructural changes. Neurofilament (NF) immunohistochemistry was used to validate findings by in vivo diffusion MRI.ResultsTBM showed that PEE mice exhibited a significantly smaller third ventricle at P28 (family-wise error rate (FWE), p 
Source: Neurotoxicology and Teratology - Category: Toxicology Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 27 December 2019Source: Best Practice &Research Clinical GastroenterologyAuthor(s): Emma Flanagan, Sally BellAbstractImaging studies are useful in the diagnostic evaluation of inflammatory bowel diseases. However, concern often exists about the safety of imaging for pregnant and lactating women and their infants, leading to unwarranted avoidance of beneficial diagnostic tests or disruption of breastfeeding. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are not associated with ionizing radiation and are the imaging techniques of choice for pregnant patients. Safety of MRI contra...
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 27 December 2019Source: Best Practice &Research Clinical GastroenterologyAuthor(s): Emma Flanagan, Sally BellAbstractImaging studies are useful in the diagnostic evaluation of inflammatory bowel diseases. However, concern often exists about the safety of imaging for pregnant and lactating women and their infants, leading to unwarranted avoidance of beneficial diagnostic tests or disruption of breastfeeding. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are not associated with ionizing radiation and are the imaging techniques of choice for pregnant patients. Safety of MRI contra...
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
AbstractDue to the growing use of cross-sectional imaging in emergency departments, acute gynaecologic disorders are increasingly diagnosed on urgent multidetector computed tomography (CT) studies, often requested under alternative presumptive diagnoses in reproductive-age women. If clinical conditions and state-of-the-art scanner availability permit, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is superior to CT due to its more in-depth characterisationof abnormal or inconclusive gynaecological findings, owing to excellent soft-tissue contrast, intrinsic multiplanar capabilities and lack of ionising radiation.This pictorial review ai...
Source: Insights into Imaging - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
AbstractAcute gynaecologic disorders are commonly encountered in daily clinical practice of emergency departments (ED) and predominantly occur in reproductive-age women. Since clinical presentation may be nonspecific and physical findings are often inconclusive, imaging is required for a timely and accurate diagnosis. Although ultrasound is the ideal non-invasive first-line technique, nowadays multidetector computed tomography (CT) is extensively used in the ED, particularly when a non-gynaecologic disorder is suspected and differential diagnosis from gastrointestinal and urologic diseases is needed. As a result, CT often ...
Source: Insights into Imaging - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
This article discusses the 4 main imaging modalities used to evaluate reproductive-aged women: ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and fluoroscopy. For each modality, major clinical indications are described, along with important technical considerations unique to imaging reproductive-aged women. Finally, key safety issues are discussed, particularly with regard to imaging pregnant patients.
Source: Radiologic Clinics of North America - Category: Radiology Authors: Source Type: research
We present the case of unilateral nonhemorrhagic adrenal infarct in a 29-week pregnant 21-year-old woman. The patient presented with right upper quadrant pain, nausea, and vomiting. Ultrasonography of the right upper quadrant and appendix was negative for pathology. Magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen demonstrated a right nonhemorrhagic adrenal infarct, subsequently confirmed with limited computed tomography of the upper abdomen. This case discusses the clinical presentation and pertinent imaging findings of adrenal infarction in pregnancy.
Source: Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography - Category: Radiology Tags: Abdominal Imaging Source Type: research
ConclusionsOur method supported or altered clinical decision-making and treatment in this cohort. A diagnostic tool for PE without intravenous contrast agent or radiation is of great benefit for certain patients.
Source: European Journal of Radiology Open - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
ConclusionEclampsia secondary to a pregnancy-induced hypertension seems to be secondary to a hypertensive encephalopathy with vascular origin cerebral edema in the majority of the cases; however, the association with a vasospasm can exist.
Source: Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases Supplements - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
A 28-year-old pregnant woman underwent an emergency caesarian section after 39 weeks of gestation because of decreased fetal movement and baseline fetal heart rate variability. The neonate was diagnosed with neonatal asphyxia and presented with right cardiac failure due to pulmonary hypertension. The neonate presented convulsion, and plane computed tomography (CT) showed dilation of the vein of Galen and sinuses on day 3. Magnetic resonance imaging and CT with contrast were performed after cardiac failure subsided, and there was no evidence of arteriovenous shunt and normalization of the vein of Galen. The patient was diag...
Source: Pediatric Neurosurgery - Category: Neurosurgery Source Type: research
ConclusionDevising a treatment strategy with the obstetrician was important in this case to manage the hematoma and cavernous malformation safely.
Source: Interdisciplinary Neurosurgery - Category: Neurosurgery Source Type: research
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