Friday ’s Daily Brief:  Yemen exclusive, India rights, Chile, Ebola updates

Our top stories for Friday include an exclusive UN News interview with Yemen Envoy Martin Griffiths; India’s new “discriminatory” citizenship law; a milestone smallpox eradication anniversary; helicopters deployed in DR Congo Ebola fight; Mediterranean migrant latest, and Chile’s deadly protests: UN report finds clear pattern of repression.
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Infectious Diseases (CDC OID). Published: 2/24/2020. This resource, updated on February 24, 2020, provides information about legal authorities for isolation and quarantine, which are public health practices used to stop or limit the spread of disease. Federal isolation and quarantine are authorized for these communicable diseases: Cholera, diphtheria, infectious tuberculosis, plague, smallpox, yellow fever, viral hemorrhagic fevers (including Ebola), severe acute respiratory syndromes, and flu that can cause a pandemic. (Text)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Pandemics are perversely democratic. They’re nasty, lethal and sneaky, but they don’t discriminate. No matter your age, ethnicity, religion, gender, or nation, you’re a part of the pathogenic constituency. That shared vulnerability, and the resulting human collectivism—a universal response to a universal threat—is newly and vividly evident in the face of the now-global outbreak of the novel coronavirus known as 2019-nCoV. As of writing, there have been over 30,000 diagnosed cases and over 630 related deaths. A virus that emerged in a single city, Wuhan, China—indeed, in a single crowded ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV Infectious Disease Source Type: news
It's too soon to know for sure how the tale of the novel coronavirus will play out,but at this point we have a pretty good idea. A stipulation in both of the scenarios at the linked essay is that yeah, it gets loose into the wild and eventually can show up anywhere in the world. I think that's pretty much definitely going to happen if it hasn't already.Scenario number 1, and most likely, in my view, it will just be one more virus that causes what amounts to a common cold and in a few people who are otherwise debilitated goes on to be complicated by pneumonia. In that case, for a year or two it will circulate as a novel vir...
Source: Stayin' Alive - Category: American Health Source Type: blogs
A gas explosion has sparked a fire at a Russian bioweapons facility which stores viruses including Ebola, smallpox and Anthrax. The blast occurred on Monday after a gas cylinder exploded during scheduled repair work on the fifth floor of the six-story Russian State Centre for Research on Virology and Biotechnology, commonly known as Vector, the facility said in a statement. No biological material was held in the sanitary inspection room where the explosion occurred, and no structural damage was caused to the concrete laboratory building, the center added. One worker was taken to hospital and is being treated in intensive c...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized onetime russia smallpox Source Type: news
Facility know as Vector is one of only two sites holding virus, and also houses Ebola samplesA gas explosion has sparked a fire at a Russian laboratory complex stockpiling viruses ranging from smallpox to Ebola, authorities have said.The State Research Centre of Virology and Biotechnology denied that the fire had exposed the public to the pathogens stored inside, some of the deadliest on Earth.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Russia Europe Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news Source Type: news
In the first episode for 2019, the TWiV team reviews the amazing virology stories of the past year. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Please take the TWiV listener survey ASV 2019 Satellite Symposia Crowdfunding for EV-D68 research TWiV World Tour 2018 t-shirt (Amazon) Cool virology from 2018 Viruses behind AD? TWiV 505, TWiV 519, clinical trial one and two Wolbachia-mosquito release halts dengue (TWiV 506); World Mosq...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - Category: Virology Authors: Source Type: podcasts
Source: University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC). Published: 5/2018. This four-page document provides guidance to obtain and process laboratory specimens while maintaining infection control practices, including in cases of handling viral hemorrhagic fevers such as the Ebola virus. It lists the materials needed, and details the steps for obtaining and processing specimens for viral hemorrhagic fevers, smallpox, and other diseases. (PDF)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Source: University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC). Published: 5/2018. This four-page document provides guidance to obtain and process laboratory specimens while maintaining infection control practices, including in cases of handling viral hemorrhagic fevers such as the Ebola virus. It lists the materials needed, and details the steps for obtaining and processing specimens for viral hemorrhagic fevers, smallpox, and other diseases. (PDF)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
The repeated outbreaks of zoonotic infectious diseases with epidemic potential in Central and West Africa, such as Ebola, Rift valley fever, Chikungunya and Dengue, continue to pose major public health threats to regional, continental and global health security (WHO, 2018a,b). Whilst lessons are being learnt from each outbreak (Zumla et al., 2017), and the ‘One Human-Environmental-Animal Health’ approach is gaining momentum (Eteng et al., 2018), much more remains to be done to achieve a substantial change of the status quo (Zumla et al., 2016).
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Conclusions: Nearly half of states in the United States lack an HLIU, yet most prefer to have patients with HHCDs treated in high-level isolation. Recent budget cuts and uncertainty of future funding threaten the abilities of health departments to devote the necessary resources and staff to prepare for and deliver the desired care to HHCD cases. The lack of HLIUs in some states may complicate transport to a geographically proximate HLIU. Moreover, limited guidance on diseases that warrant high-level isolation may cause disagreement in HHCD patient placement between health departments, diagnosing facilities, and HLIUs.
Source: Journal of Public Health Management and Practice - Category: Health Management Tags: Research Reports: Research Full Report Source Type: research
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