Sleeping Too Much Might Raise Stroke Risk

Disturbed sleep was also tied to a 29% increase in the risk for stroke, compared with people whose sleep quality was good.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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...No rest for the caregiver. I climbed back in the car and fought my way through the streets to Mom. It wasn’t another false alarm. Mom really had fallen, and as usually happens after a fall, I couldn’t get her up off the floor by myself. I had to call the EMTs — again. Thankfully, this time she wasn’t seriously hurt. Hours later, once I’d settled Mom in her bed, I forced my way back through the still unplowed streets toward home, hoping for a couple of hours of sleep before morning, when I had to take my uncle to his neurology appointment for a post-stroke checkup. Continue reading on Health...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
Sleep disturbances such as insomnia are extremely common, especially in women after menopause. According to data from the National Institutes of Health, sleep disturbance varies from 16% to 42% before menopause, from 39% to 47% during perimenopause, and from 35% to 60% after menopause. Insomnia is a serious medical problem defined by frequent difficulty falling or staying asleep that impacts a person’s life in a negative way. Hormone changes around menopause can lead to sleep problems for many reasons, including changing sleep requirements, increased irritability, and hot flashes. What menopausal women eat could have...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Fatigue Food as medicine Healthy Eating Menopause Nutrition Sleep Source Type: blogs
Purpose of review Stroke and sleep apnea are highly prevalent conditions with a physiologically plausible bidirectional relationship. This review addresses prestroke sleep apnea, wake-up stroke and sleep apnea, and poststroke sleep apnea, with an attempt to highlight research published in the last 18 months. Recent findings Sleep apnea is highly prevalent poststroke. Poststroke sleep apnea is associated with worse poststroke functional and cognitive outcomes and a higher risk of recurrent stroke. Physiologic tests are needed to diagnose sleep apnea in poststroke patients as sleep apnea questionnaires do not perform we...
Source: Current Opinion in Neurology - Category: Neurology Tags: CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASE: Edited by Mitchell S.V. Elkind Source Type: research
Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine,Volume 16, Issue 1, Page 55-64, January 2020.
Source: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine : JCSM - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeObstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with increased risk for stroke, which is known to further impair respiratory functions. However, it is unknown whether the type and severity of respiratory events are linked to stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Thus, we investigate whether the characteristics of individual respiratory events differ between patients experiencing  TIA or acute ischemic stroke and matched patients with clinically suspected sleep-disordered breathing.MethodsPolygraphic data of 77 in-patients with acute ischemic stroke (n = 49) or TIA (n = ...
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
; P, Mervaala E, Myllymaa K Abstract PURPOSE: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with increased risk for stroke, which is known to further impair respiratory functions. However, it is unknown whether the type and severity of respiratory events are linked to stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Thus, we investigate whether the characteristics of individual respiratory events differ between patients experiencing TIA or acute ischemic stroke and matched patients with clinically suspected sleep-disordered breathing. METHODS: Polygraphic data of 77 in-patients with acute ischemic stroke (n&thin...
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Sleep Breath Source Type: research
Background and Purpose: Sleep related Stroke (SRS) is common and has been associated with cerebral small vessel diseases (SVD) in ischemic strokes (ISs). We tested the hypothesis that SRS is associated with SVD in both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Methods: Prospectively collected data from patients consecutively enrolled after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) related to SVD or after IS were analyzed. Symptom onset was recorded as SRS versus awake. Each ICH was grouped according to lobar and deep locations.
Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 January 2020Source: PharmaNutritionAuthor(s): Menizibeya O. WelcomeAbstractOver the past decades, evidences have consistently shown that neuroinflammation is a critical underlying process in a range of CNS diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, depression, sleep disorders, and stroke. Thus prevention of neuroinflammation represents one of the most important goals in the treatment of these disorders. Unfortunately, the mechanisms of neuroinflammation in different CNS disorders are not fully understood. Here, I review recent literature data on the mechanisms of neuroinflammation...
Source: PharmaNutrition - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
This study shows reducing excess fat in general can reduce tongue size,” said Dr. Raj Dasgupta, a sleep specialist at Keck Medicine at the University of Southern California, who was not involved in the study. In the new paper, the researchers used MRI imaging to measure the effect on upper airways of a 10% weight loss in 67 obese patients. The images showed reducing tongue fat was the primary reason overall sleep apnea scores improved by 31%. “In fact, the more tongue fat you lost, the more your apnea improved,” said Schwab, who is the co-director of the Penn Sleep Center at Penn Medicine. Costs of sleep ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Source Type: news
A, Sørensen M Abstract Exposure to traffic noise is associated with stress and sleep disturbances. The World Health Organization (WHO) recently concluded that road traffic noise increases the risk for ischemic heart disease and potentially other cardiometabolic diseases, including stroke, obesity, and diabetes. The WHO report focused on whole-day noise exposure, but new epidemiological and translational field noise studies indicate that nighttime noise, in particular, is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) through increased levels of stress hormones and vascular oxidative stress, lead...
Source: Annual Review of Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Annu Rev Public Health Source Type: research
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