Repeated lumbar punctures within 3 days may affect CSF biomarker levels

Lumbar puncture (LP) is a common way of collecting cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) both in the clinic and in research. In this extension of a study on the relationship between sleep deprivation and CSF biomarkers fo...
Source: Cerebrospinal Fluid Research - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Short paper Source Type: research

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AbstractLumbar puncture (LP) is a common way of collecting cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) both in the clinic and in research. In this extension of a study on the relationship between sleep deprivation and CSF biomarkers for Alzheimer ’s disease, we investigated CSF biomarker dynamics in relation to rebound sleep after sleep deprivation. Two LPs were performed within 3 days in 13 healthy volunteers. We noticed an unexpected sharp rise in biomarker concentrations in the second sample and therefore repeated the experiment, but w ithout sleep intervention, in four additional individuals. The findings were similar in thes...
Source: Fluids and Barriers of the CNS - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Importance: Prior studies evaluating opening pressure (OP) have mostly involved lumbar puncture (LP) for diagnosis of neurologic disease or small cohorts of healthy volunteers and therefore the normal OP is not well defined. Objective: The goal of this study was to establish the normal range of OP in a community-based population using the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging (MCSA) and to evaluate factors that contribute to OP variability. Design: LP OP were obtained from participants aged 32 to 95 years between 11/1/07 and 10/1/17, as part of routine data collection for the MCSA, a longitudinal, population-based study of res...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Semin Neurol 2019; 39: 391-398 DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1688915Treatment of neurological, neurocognitive, and neuropsychiatric impairment in the setting of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection remains a complex problem, given several possible mechanisms of pathogenesis. The etiology must be determined based on clinical judgment and objective evidence, including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) data from lumbar puncture and neuroimaging information from magnetic resonance imaging, when available and indicated. Other neuroinfectious etiologies must be ruled out, including central nervous system (CNS) opportunistic infections. HI...
Source: Seminars in Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
We describe a case of a patient who presented with meningitis due to an atypical organism that usually resides in the oral cavity, and who developed nontraumatic pneumocephalus in the hospital due to CPAP therapy. The underlying cause, a cerebrospinal fluid leak, was likely the mediator for both pathologies. In the setting of the increasing prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea, physicians can benefit from being aware of this atypical presentation of meningitis and atypical complication of CPAP therapy.Citation:Charokopos A, Card ME, Manes RP, Shaw A. Iatrogenic nontraumatic CPAP-induced pneumocephalus in a patient with me...
Source: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine : JCSM - Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: research
Abstract OBJECTIVE: Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder characterized in humans by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy. Greater than fifty percent of narcoleptic patients have an onset of symptoms prior to the age of 18. Current general agreement considers the loss of hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) neurons as the direct cause of narcolepsy notably cataplexy. To assess whether brain histamine (HA) is also involved, we quantified the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of HA and tele-methylhistamine (t-MeHA), the direct metabolite of HA between children with orexin-deficient narcolepsy type 1 (NT1) and controls. ...
Source: CNS Neuroscience and Therapeutics - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: CNS Neurosci Ther Source Type: research
By SAURABH JHA Saurabh Jha This is the second part of Dr. Jha’s conversation with Dr. Jonathan Cusack, who was the former supervisor and mentor of Dr. Bawa-Garba, a pediatrician convicted of manslaughter of fetal sepsis in Jack Adcock. Read the first part of this series here.     Dr. Jonathan Cusack versus the General Medical Council I spoke with Dr. Jonathan Cusack, consultant neonatologist at Leicester Royal Infirmary (LRI), and former supervisor and mentor of Dr. Bawa-Garba, the trainee pediatrician convicted of manslaughter for delayed diagnosis of fatal sepsis in Jack Adcock, a six-year-old boy with Do...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: NHS #BawaGarba @roguerad Source Type: blogs
By SAURABH JHA   I spoke with Dr. Jonathan Cusack, consultant neonatologist at Leicester Royal Infirmary (LRI), and former supervisor and mentor of Dr. Bawa-Garba, the trainee pediatrician convicted of manslaughter for delayed diagnosis of fatal sepsis in Jack Adcock, a six-year-old boy with Down’s syndrome. We had drinks at The George, pub opposite the Royal Courts of Justice. In the first part of the interview we discussed the events on Friday February 18th, 2011, the day of Jack presented to LRI. In the second part of the interview we talk about the events after fatal Friday – how the crown pr...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: NHS #BawaGarba @roguerad Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsThese results are consistent with increased central nervous system responsiveness to noradrenergic signaling in individuals with a history of traumatic exposure, raising the possibility that there may be long-lasting physiologic effects of trauma-exposure that exist independently of whether an individual meets criteria for PTSD at any given point in time. Exploration of the mechanism by which brain responsiveness to NE is modulated following trauma holds the possibility of finding new strategies for both preventing and treating PTSD.
Source: Neurobiology of Stress - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS Transverse sinus stenting is a rapidly developing technique that has shown good effectiveness and safety in the literature. Authors of the present study found that stenting a flow-obstructed transverse sinus in patients with IIH was a safe and effective way to treat the condition. PMID: 29961386 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Neurosurgical Focus - Category: Neurosurgery Authors: Tags: Neurosurg Focus Source Type: research
A 13 year-old boy started to present recurrent episodes, lasting from 3 to 12 days, characterized by prolonged sleep time, megaphagia, derealization, mood depression, rudeness and hypersexual behaviour. Episodes occurred after infective diseases, moderate alcohol assumption or sleep deprivation, and were often heralded by terrifying visual hallucinations. Physical examination, blood tests, lumbar puncture, EEG, brain CT scan and MRI were normal. The patient arrived at our lab at the age of 15, during a relapse.
Source: Sleep Medicine - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
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