Anorexia Stole My Childhood, and More

It was in fourth and fifth grade that I decided I didn’t want to grow up. I wanted to be the shortest in my classes, and I even walked around with bent knees to appear shorter. I remember competing with friends to see who could come closest to being able to fit our hands around our waists. I remember having a friend over and watching a Richard Simmons “Sweatin’ to the Oldies” exercise video and then having us both get on the scale to compare weights. I was just a little girl and I don’t know where this idea came from. This was way back in the mid-90s when there were few resources for children with anorexia. My own mom had never dieted a day in my life and had the healthiest relationship with food of any mom I knew. It was just my own brain, harassing me and badgering me that I needed to stay small. I was a gymnast which certainly was a factor but not the sole factor. I was always naturally normal/thin, as is my family and all of my relatives. I don’t know why my happy, carefree childhood became obsessed with this. I remember watching a 20/20 special on Peggy Claude Pierre, a woman who had created a new way of treating girls with anorexia, a disease I was just learning about but didn’t realize would soon consume me. I remember sitting in the dark family room watching the show and how she spoon-fed girls who were refusing to eat. She treated them like little, sick children and something about this was highly appealing to me. My mom was ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Eating Disorders Personal Body Image Source Type: blogs

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This article includes references to self-injury, intravenous drug use and disordered eating.* One in five US high school students have reported being bullied. Approximately 160,000 teenagers have skipped school as a preventative measure. I encountered bullies for the first time in second grade, in the midst of such an innocent time of my youth. I dreaded entering my elementary school classroom, as I was well aware of what my presence would entail. I endured both verbal and physical harassment from my fellow peers for nearly a decade. I was passive, inevitably leading to the acceptance of my “fate,” in addition ...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Anorexia Bullying Depression Eating Disorders Personal Stories Substance Abuse Addiction Recovery Anorexia Nervosa Drug Use heroin Self Harm Self Injury Source Type: news
At first, Melanie Murphy was just following doctor’s orders. Murphy, then 19, had gained weight during a period of depression, and her doctor told her she should lose some. She went from 180 to 125 pounds in 18 months—and even when she knew it was time to stop slimming down, she couldn’t shake the need to chase a goal. Without weight loss, she needed a new target. That became finding the “perfect” diet, one that was clean and pure and would keep her healthy for years to come. At least, that was how she thought about it then. These days, she uses a different descriptor: “orthorexia,&rdquo...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Eating Disorder Source Type: news
In Reply We thank King and Ehrlich for their thoughtful Letter critiquing our meta-analysis that examined delay discounting as a transdiagnostic process in psychiatric disorders. In our article, we proposed that delay discounting, an index of impulsive decision-making, falls on a continuum. At the aggregate level, most disorders examined (eg, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, borderline personality disorder, binge-eating disorder, and bulimia nervosa) exhibited steeper, more impulsive, delay discounting compared with controls, whereas people with anorexia nervosa exhibited shallower, less impulsiv...
Source: JAMA Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
To the Editor Amlung and colleagues published a meta-analysis of delay discounting (DD), a behavioral measure of impulsivity and self-control, including 57 effect sizes from 43 studies across 8 psychiatric diagnostic categories. Results indicated a greater preference for smaller immediate monetary rewards (ie, more impulsive decision-making) in 6 conditions (major depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, borderline personality disorder, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder) compared with controls but greater preference for larger delayed rewards (ie, more self-controlled choice) in anorexia nervosa. The findings ...
Source: JAMA Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
z-Nevado E, Gervasini G Abstract PURPOSE: We aimed to analyze the association between common polymorphisms in dopamine pathways with personality dimensions frequently present in patients with eating disorders (ED). METHODS: A total of 324 patients [210 with anorexia nervosa (AN), 80 with bulimia nervosa (BN) and 34 with binge-eating disorder (BED)] were diagnosed according to DSM-5 criteria and interviewed using the EDI 2 and SCL-90R questionnaires at the eating disorders unit. Blood samples were drawn and the DNA screened for polymorphisms in dopamine receptor genes (DRD2 A2/A1 and DRD3 Ser9Gly) and in the d...
Source: Eating and weight disorders : EWD - Category: Eating Disorders & Weight Management Authors: Tags: Eat Weight Disord Source Type: research
I dial the number hastily written on a post-it note that I’ve had shoved in my wallet for two weeks. Sweat starts to bead on my palms as I wait for the line to ring. “Hello,” a soft spoken woman answers. “I’d like to make an appointment,” I utter as my voice shakes. “Okay, let’s do that,” she says as she trails off into a line of questions to see what exactly I need an appointment for and whether she’s the one to help me or not. I’m in my thirties, a mother of three, with ten years of recovery under my belt. I thought all of this was behind me. But it crept ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Eating Disorders Personal Treatment Source Type: blogs
ConclusionThis meta-analysis of 25 validation studies demonstrates that the SCOFF is a simple and useful screening tool for young women at risk for AN and BN. However, there is not enough evidence to support utilizing the SCOFF for screening for the range of DSM-5 eating disorders in primary care and community-based settings. Further examination of the validity of the SCOFF or development of a new screening tool, or multiple tools, to screen for the range of DSM-5 eating disorders heterogenous populations is warranted.Trial RegistrationThis study is registered online with PROSPERO (CRD42018089906).
Source: Journal of General Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Source Type: research
People who are homosexual, bisexual, or unsure of their sexual orientation have both a higher risk and a higher rate of eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder than people who are heterosexual, astudy in theInternational Journal of Eating Disorders has found. Although prior research suggests that members of sexual minorities have a higher risk of eating disorder symptoms than heterosexuals, this study is believed to be the first to use data from a large number of people to determine how common eating disorders are among sexual minority members.Rebecca C. Kamody, Ph.D., of Yale ...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: anorexia nervosa binge eating disorder bulimia nervosa DSM-5 eating disorders heterosexual International Journal of Eating Disorders NESARC-III Rebecca C. Kamody sexual minorities Source Type: research
Abstract E-Therapies for Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa and Binge Eating Disorder Abstract. Eating disorders can often be treated with psychotherapy, but mostly due to a lack of trained clinicians, the majority of the persons concerned do not receive any treatment. In recent years, internet-based psychotherapy (e-therapy) was proposed and tested in several pilot projects as a novel possibility to offer a larger number of places on a treatment program with a constant number of available clinicians. Recent results are promising, but before an implementation into standard care can take place, more detailed knowled...
Source: Praxis - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Praxis (Bern 1994) Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 26 October 2019Source: Journal of Psychiatric ResearchAuthor(s): Kathryn E. Smith, Tyler B. Mason, Lauren M. Schaefer, Adrienne Juarascio, Robert Dvorak, Noam Weinbach, Ross D. Crosby, Stephen A. WonderlichAbstractBinge eating presents in the context of several eating disorders (EDs) and has been shown to be associated with negative affectivity and inhibitory control deficits. While considerable ecological momentary assessment (EMA) work in EDs has demonstrated the importance of intra-individual variability in affect in predicting binge episodes, no research has considered how fluctuation...
Source: Journal of Psychiatric Research - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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