Transdermal Methanol Intoxication.

This report describes a case of transdermal methanol intoxication, which is a rare condition. A 58-year-old woman presented with nausea, vomiting, weakness, diplopia and dizziness. On neurological examination, she only had diplopia. On physical examination, a hyperemic lesion with clear borders was found over the right knee. The patient's recent medical history revealed that four days prior to the onset of symptoms, she had covered her knee with a methanol-soaked bandage in an attempt to alleviate her knee pain. She had a high osmolar gap as well as high anion-gap metabolic acidosis (HAGMA). Methanol intoxication was suspected due to HAGMA and high osmolar gap. Serum methanol levels were subsequently measured and found to be 37.9 mg/ dL. The patient was treated with intravenous (IV) bicarbonate, IV ethyl alcohol and hemodialysis. She was discharged with no central nervous system or ophthalmologic sequelae. Methanol poisoning should be kept in mind in patients with diplopia and unexplained metabolic acidosis. Although most methanol intoxication cases occur after oral ingestion, it should be considered that methanol poisoning may occur transdermally. PMID: 31823634 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Archives of Iranian Medicine - Category: Middle East Health Authors: Tags: Arch Iran Med Source Type: research

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AbstractBackgroundPotential protective effects of nonpharmacological treatments (NPT) against long-term pain-related adverse outcomes have not been examined.ObjectiveTo compare active duty U.S. Army service members with chronic pain who did/did not receive NPT in the Military Health System (MHS) and describe the association between receiving NPT and adverse outcomes after transitioning to the Veterans Health Administration (VHA).Design and ParticipantsA longitudinal cohort study of active duty Army service members whose MHS healthcare records indicated presence of chronic pain after an index deployment to Iraq or Afghanist...
Source: Journal of General Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Source Type: research
 Psychiatric medications are the religion and politics of the mental health advocacy world — don’t bring them up unless you want a fight to break out. Luckily, here at Not Crazy, we don’t shy away from confrontation.  In this episode, we cover the good, the bad, and the ugly surrounding medications. Like whether or not you should take them. We tackle side effects like feeling numb and sexual dysfunction and share our personal histories with medication therapy. Listen now! (Transcript Available Below) SUBSCRIBE &REVIEW About The Not Crazy Podcast Hosts Gabe Howard is an award-winning wri...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Antidepressant Antipsychotic General Medications Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Psychology Research Sexuality Stimulants Treatment Source Type: blogs
Discussion “[Cannabis] is a genus of flowering plant with three main varieties: sativa, indica and ruderalis.” It has been used for hundreds of years for hemp or fiber and also for psychoactive and medicinal effects. The active compounds are collectively called cannabinoids, of which delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) are the most abundant. The floral buds or calyxes of the plant have the most cannabinoids, but other parts of the plant are also used such as leaves. Hash oil, hashish (or resin) and marijuana (dried leaves) are the common products from strongest to least strongest products. ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
You're reading 4 Villains Lurking in the Dark – A Complete Guide to Handle Trolls and Haters, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. If you are one of those people who is not scared to stick your neck out and take risks, then you are also one of those people who may get knocked down everyone once in a while. Whether, you’re a blogger who gets a tsunami of personal attacks when you post half an opinion, or an expert who runs a seminar and the participants start to criticize you. You may have even pit...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: featured relationships self improvement haters pickthebrain positivity trolls Source Type: blogs
We report the case of a 28-year-old man admitted to the casualty department at Ngwelezana Hospital, Empangeni, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, with a history of vomiting and abdominal pain after ingestion of ~100 mL of an unknown substance, later identified as paraquat, together with an unknown amount of alcohol, in a suicide attempt. He developed respiratory distress associated with lung parenchymal infiltrates that required ventilatory support and later a spontaneous pneumothorax, and died in the intensive care unit. We discuss the importance of a high index of suspicion of paraquat poisoning in rural areas, where paraquat ...
Source: South African Medical Journal - Category: African Health Tags: S Afr Med J Source Type: research
Depression often goes overlooked, under-diagnosed and untreated in adults 65 years old and older. Symptoms tend to get dismissed as a standard part of aging. But they’re anything but. Depression is a serious illness that disrupts lives and increases the risk for suicide. Thankfully, however, it is treatable. Very treatable. In her excellent, eye-opening book Depression in Later Life: An Essential Guide psychologist Deborah Serani, Psy.D, sheds light on this prevalent disorder. She shares a slew of vital facts, research and case studies about what depression looks like in seniors and what helps to treat it. Below are ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Books Depression Disorders Family Friends General Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress anxiety Chronic Illness Deborah Serani Elderly Helplessness Hopelessness late-life suicide later life depression Source Type: blogs
Barry, You have opened your sealed envelope because suicide is now an option. Through no fault of your own, you were drawn here by your illness and circumstances. As your past rational, cogent and lucid self, I don’t know exactly what led you to this point. To fall this far, something has happened to all you have learned in therapy and by practicing various skills. Your confidence that you are strong enough to survive this is shaken, if not completely absent. Know this, Barry: you have survived the fearsome specter of suicide before. You cannot control the events that brought you here; with courage and support you ca...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Depression Disorders General Loneliness Personal Stories Psychology Suicide self help Suicidal Ideation Suicide Prevention Source Type: news
This article originally appeared as part of the On Coming Alive project: http://oncomingalive.com/posts/adjusting-lens-shifting-survival-back-life/ ___________________ If you -- or someone you know -- need help, please call 1-800-273-8255 for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. If you are outside of the U.S., please visit the International Association for Suicide Prevention for a database of international resources. If you're struggling with an eating disorder, call the National Eating Disorder Association hotline at 1-800-931-2237. Need help with substance abuse or mental health issues? In the U.S., call 800-662-HE...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
The news that mortality is increasing among middle-aged white Americans spread like wildfire last week (see here and here and here) thanks to a study by Anne Case and Angus Deaton, who recently won the Nobel Prize in Economics. As researchers who study the social determinants of health, we were very pleased to see such widespread interest in this urgent national problem. Unfortunately, there are a couple of pieces of the puzzle that we think the Case and Deaton study missed. By not looking at men and women separately, Case and Deaton failed to see that rising mortality is especially pronounced among women. The au...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Equity and Disparities Featured Population Health Public Health alcohol abuse drug abuse low-income women mortality rates safety net programs Social Determinants of Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
Middle-aged white Americans are dying at increasing rates and half a million people are dead who should not be, according to a new report published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The study, co-authored by Anne Case and Angus Deaton, analyzed death rates for men and women aged 45 to 54 in the United States, a range often categorized as "middle-age." The duo, both economics professors at Princeton, then compared the data to those death rates found within other domestic racial categories and those seen in similarly wealthy nations. Black, Hispanic and older Americans (65 and up) have continu...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
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