Comparing the interobserver reproducibility of different regions of interest on multi-parametric renal magnetic resonance imaging in healthy volunteers, patients with heart failure and renal transplant recipients.

Comparing the interobserver reproducibility of different regions of interest on multi-parametric renal magnetic resonance imaging in healthy volunteers, patients with heart failure and renal transplant recipients. MAGMA. 2019 Dec 10;: Authors: Rankin AJ, Allwood-Spiers S, Lee MMY, Zhu L, Woodward R, Kuehn B, Radjenovic A, Sattar N, Roditi G, Mark PB, Gillis KA Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess interobserver reproducibility of different regions of interest (ROIs) on multi-parametric renal MRI using commercially available software. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Healthy volunteers (HV), patients with heart failure (HF) and renal transplant recipients (Tx) were recruited. Localiser scans, T1 mapping and pseudo-continuous arterial spin labelling (pCASL) were performed. HV and Tx also underwent diffusion-weighted imaging to allow calculation of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). For T1, pCASL and ADC, ROIs were drawn for whole kidney (WK), cortex (Cx), user-defined representative cortex (rep-Cx) and medulla. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (CoV) were assessed. RESULTS: Forty participants were included (10 HV, 10 HF and 20 Tx). The ICC for renal volume was 0.97 and CoV 6.5%. For T1 and ADC, WK, Cx, and rep-Cx were highly reproducible with ICC ≥ 0.76 and CoV  0.86, but CoV up to 14.2%). While reproducible, WK values were derived from a wide spread of data (ROI standard deviation 17% to 55% of...
Source: Magma - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: MAGMA Source Type: research

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In this study, we investigated the link between AF and senescence markers through the assessment of protein expression in the tissue lysates of human appendages from patients in AF, including paroxysmal (PAF) or permanent AF (PmAF), and in sinus rhythm (SR). The major findings of the study indicated that the progression of AF is strongly related to the human atrial senescence burden as determined by p53 and p16 expression. The stepwise increase of senescence (p53, p16), prothrombotic (TF), and proremodeling (MMP-9) markers observed in the right atrial appendages of patients in SR, PAF, and PmAF points toward multiple inter...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
(American Heart Association) One-year survival was 90% for adults with severe heart failure who received a heart transplant from a donor with hepatitis C, which was nearly identical to those who received a heart from donors who did not have hepatitis C (91%). Rates of organ rejection, stroke and kidney dialysis were similar between the two groups. More research is needed to assess longer-term results, however, increased use of hearts from donors with hepatitis C could help overcome the national shortage of donor organs.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Conclusion A great deal of progress is being made in the matter of treating aging: in advocacy, in funding, in the research and development. It can never be enough, and it can never be fast enough, given the enormous cost in suffering and lost lives. The longevity industry is really only just getting started in the grand scheme of things: it looks vast to those of us who followed the slow, halting progress in aging research that was the state of things a decade or two ago. But it is still tiny compared to the rest of the medical industry, and it remains the case that there is a great deal of work yet to be done at all...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 3 January 2020Source: The Annals of Thoracic SurgeryAuthor(s): Oliver K. Jawitz, Marat Fudim, Vignesh Raman, Vanessa L. Blumer, Kadir Caliskan, Adam D. DeVore, Robert J. Mentz, Carmelo Milano, Osama Soliman, Joseph Rogers, Chetan PatelAbstractBackgroundPatients with end stage heart failure are increasingly being bridged to heart transplant (BTT) with mechanical circulatory support (MCS), however the association between a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) BTT strategy and post-transplant renal outcomes is unclear. The aim of this study was to analyze the association of LVAD BTT with th...
Source: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Source Type: research
Abstract BACKGROUND: Patients with end stage heart failure are increasingly being bridged to heart transplant (BTT) with mechanical circulatory support (MCS), however the association between a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) BTT strategy and post-transplant renal outcomes is unclear. The aim of this study was to analyze the association of LVAD BTT with the development of post-transplant renal failure using a large national registry. METHODS: We queried the 2009-2018 United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) registry for all adults undergoing first-time heart or heart-kidney transplantation and stratified ...
Source: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Tags: Ann Thorac Surg Source Type: research
AbstractAimsVentilation vs. carbon dioxide production (VE/VCO2) is among the strongest cardiopulmonary exercise testing prognostic parameters in heart failure (HF). It is usually reported as an absolute value. The current definition of normal VE/VCO2 slope values is inadequate, since it was built from small groups of subjects with a particularly limited number of women and elderly. We aimed to define VE/VCO2 slope prediction formulas in a sizable population and to test whether the prognostic power of VE/VCO2 slope in HF was different if expressed as a percentage of the predicted value or as an absolute value.Methods and re...
Source: ESC Heart Failure - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Original Research Article Source Type: research
Conclusion A great deal of progress is being made in the matter of treating aging: in advocacy, in funding, in the research and development. It can never be enough, and it can never be fast enough, given the enormous cost in suffering and lost lives. The longevity industry is really only just getting started in the grand scheme of things: it looks vast to those of us who followed the slow, halting progress in aging research that was the state of things a decade or two ago. But it is still tiny compared to the rest of the medical industry, and it remains the case that there is a great deal of work yet to be done at all...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Of Interest Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 19 December 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Simon Correa, Jessy Korina Pena-Esparragoza, Katherine M. Scovner, Sushrut S. Waikar, Finnian R. Mc CauslandBackgroundMyeloperoxidase (MPO) catalyzes the formation of reactive nitrogen species and levels are elevated in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Although increased oxidative stress and inflammation are associated with progression of CKD and cardiovascular disease (CVD), relationships between MPO concentration, CKD progression, CVD, and death remain unclear.Study DesignProspective cohort.Setting &Par...
Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
This study shows that CA are released from periventricular and subpial regions to the cerebrospinal fluid and are present in the cervical lymph nodes, into which cerebrospinal fluid drains through the meningeal lymphatic system. We also show that CA can be phagocytosed by macrophages. We conclude that CA can act as containers that remove waste products from the brain and may be involved in a mechanism that cleans the brain. Moreover, we postulate that CA may contribute in some autoimmune brain diseases, exporting brain substances that interact with the immune system, and hypothesize that CA may contain brain markers that m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Every organ in the body is capable, to some extent, of repairing itself after an injury. As part of this process, scar tissue forms and then recedes to make room for normal tissue when healing is complete.However, when healing is disrupted — whether by chronic injury or disease — the cells that make up scar tissue can go rogue, continuously dividing and spreading until the scar eventually strangles the organ it was intended to help heal, which can lead to organ failure.That progressive, out-of-control scarring is called fibrosis, and it can occur in any organ in the body. Fibrosis plays a major role in many dis...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
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