Similarities Between Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Pulmonary Embolism

The presentation of community-acquired pneumonia with abdominal pain and a lower lobe pulmonary infiltrate1 is reminiscent of the clinical presentation with abdominal pain in a 53-year-old man in whom the eventual diagnosis was pulmonary embolism.1 Computed tomography angiography showed evidence of pulmonary embolism, and also showed an infiltrate in the right lung base, thought to represent a pulmonary infarct.2 As in the reported case of community-acquired pneumonia,1 ST-segment elevation in leads V1 to V4 can also occur in pulmonary embolism,3 in the latter instance with absence of autopsy evidence of acute myocardial infarction or coronary occlusion.
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Letter Source Type: research

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Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Young Adults Source Type: news
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Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
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Source: The Case Files - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: research
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Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
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Source: American Family Physician - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Am Fam Physician Source Type: research
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Source: Heart - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Drugs: cardiovascular system, Image challenges, Acute coronary syndromes, Venous thromboembolism, Clinical diagnostic tests Source Type: research
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Source: Neurosurgical Focus - Category: Neurosurgery Authors: Tags: Neurosurg Focus Source Type: research
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Source: Spontaneous Circulation - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs
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