A Systematic Review of the Diagnostic Criteria Used to Select Participants in Randomised Controlled Trials of Interventions Used to Treat Cervicogenic Headache.

CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review evidences the heterogeneity in the clinical characteristics used to diagnose CeH in participants recruited in randomized controlled trials. It raises a significant concern about the usefulness of currently available randomized controlled trials to determine the clinical merits of the treatment and management of people with CeHs. Our systematic review suggests that most randomized controlled trials published to date have investigated headaches with a clinical presentation involving the neck that maybe better defined as "possible," "probable," or "definitive" CeH depending on how well the diagnostic criteria used align with the most recent edition (3rd) of the International Classification of Headache Disorders. PMID: 31820439 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Headache - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Headache Source Type: research

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AbstractPurpose of ReviewPost dural puncture headache (PDPH) is a relatively common complication which may occur in the setting of inadvertent dural puncture (DP) during labor epidural analgesia and during intentional DP during spinal anesthetic placement or diagnostic lumbar puncture. Few publications have established the long-term safety of an epidural blood patch (EBP) for the treatment of a PDPH.Recent FindingsThe aim of this pilot study was to examine the association of chronic low back pain (LBP) in patients who experienced a PDPH following labor analgesia and were treated with an EBP. A total of 146 patients were co...
Source: Current Pain and Headache Reports - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
DiscussionWe expect a decrease in the use of epidural blood patch in those receiving tetracosactide, thus indicating a decrease in PDPH symptoms in these patients. This will define the therapeutic success of tetracosactide and the possibility to use this treatment as a non-invasive alternative to blood patch for PDPH treatment.Trial registrationPrimary RegistryClinicalTrials.gov Protocol Registration and Results SystemDate of Registration 24 June 2016Unique Protocol ID 69HCL15_0429Secondary IDsEudraCT Number 2015 –003357-17ClinicalTrials.gov IDNCT02813655ANSM 160214A-31Protocol versionV4 28/09/2018
Source: Trials - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
We thank Honstvet et al.1 for their interest in the Obstetric Anaesthetists Association (OAA) Guidelines on the Treatment of Obstetric Post-Dural Puncture Headache (PDPH).2 They suggest that volumes greater than 20  mL may be beneficial when performing an epidural blood patch (EBP). They also state that the OAA Guidelines give the impression that 20 mL of blood is the optimum volume to inject when performing an EBP. This is not correct. The OAA Guidelines do not suggest that more than 20 mL should not be used, simply that currently there is no good evidence to support the use of volumes greater than 20 mL.
Source: International Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research
We thank Honstvet et al.1 for their interest in the Obstetric Anaesthetists Association (OAA) Guidelines on the Treatment of Obstetric Post-Dural Puncture Headache (PDPH).2 They suggest that volumes greater than 20 mL may be beneficial when performing an epidural blood patch (EBP). They also state that the OAA Guidelines give the impression that 20 mL of blood is the optimum volume to inject when performing an EBP. This is not correct. The OAA Guidelines do not suggest that more than 20 mL should not be used, simply that currently there is no good evidence to support the use of volumes greater than 20 mL.
Source: International Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research
Sugammadex allows rapid recovery from rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade. Succinylcholine is often used for brief surgeries but is associated with myalgia, headache, histamine release, and increased lac...
Source: BMC Anesthesiology - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Spinal headache and cerebrospinal fluid leak are known complications after intrathecal baclofen treatment in children with cerebral palsy. When conservative treatments are unsuccessful, epidural blood patch can be used with confidence for these patients. In patients with ongoing symptoms, it is possible to obtain success by repeating the epidural blood patch to continue intrathecal baclofen treatment and avoid aggressive surgery. PMID: 31837185 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Paediatric Anaesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Paediatr Anaesth Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: This study showed that calcitonin could be helpful analgesic agent in different painful situations. Calcitonin can be considered an eligible treatment for acute pains related to vertebral fractures and a feasible alternative for the treatment of the acute and chronic neuropathic pains where other medications might fail. PMID: 31810524 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Rev Bras Anestesiol Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 30 November 2019Source: Journal of EthnopharmacologyAuthor(s): Ya min Luo, Xiao qiao Ren, Xue qin Yang, Hui rong Song, Ran Li, Ming hui Gao, Yi ran Li, Ran ran Zhou, Lei Ma, Shu jing Zhang, Ruan juan Dong, Dong yu Ge, Chun guo Wang, Qing jia Ren, Xiao hua TaoAbstractEthnopharmacological relevanceMigraine is a disabling neurovascular disorder, which increases risk of cardiovascular events and is a social burden worldwide. The present first-line anti-migraine medications can cause overwhelming side-effects, of which one includes the onset of cardiovascular disease. As one of the marketed Ti...
Source: Journal of Ethnopharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
The most common complication of neuraxial labor analgesia,1 accidental dural puncture (ADP), causes headache, nausea, neck stiffness, diplopia and tinnitus, all of which are attributed to leakage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the intrathecal space.2 The resultant intracranial hypotension has been shown on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to be associated with downward movement of intracranial structures, meningeal enhancement and vasodilation of blood vessels.3 Although positional headache is the most common symptom of ADP, other symptoms of intracranial hypotension may be more prominent or may present on their own.
Source: International Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research
We read with interest the recent Obstetric Anaesthetists Association (OAA) guidelines pertaining to the diagnosis and management of post-dural puncture headache (PDPH).1 The OAA guideline states “a volume of blood of 20 mL is recommended when performing an epidural blood patch (EBP) and injection should stop before 20 mL if not tolerated by the patient”. This statement gives the impression that 20 mL represents an optimum endpoint for injecting blood during EBP. Our local practice is to use patient symptoms (back discomfort) as the endpoint and hence we often exceed a volume of 20 mL.
Source: International Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research
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