A vaccine against chronic inflammatory diseases

(INSERM (Institut national de la sant é et de la recherche m é dicale)) In animals, a vaccine modifying the composition and function of the gut microbiota provides protection against the onset of chronic inflammatory bowel diseases and certain metabolic disorders, such as diabetes and obesity. This research was conducted by the team of Beno î t Chassaing, Inserm researcher at Institut Cochin (Inserm/CNRS/Universit é de Paris), whose initial findings have been published in Nature Communications.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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This study presents the effects of berberine (BBR) on the aging process resulting in a promising extension of lifespan in model organisms. BBR extended the replicative lifespan, improved the morphology, and boosted rejuvenation markers of replicative senescence in human fetal lung diploid fibroblasts. BBR also rescued senescent cells with late population doubling (PD). Furthermore, the senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal)-positive cell rates of late PD cells grown in the BBR-containing medium were ~72% lower than those of control cells, and its morphology resembled that of young cells. Mechanistically...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Abstract Hidradenitis suppurativa is a chronic folliculitis affecting intertriginous areas. Onset generally occurs in young adulthood to middle adulthood (18 to 39 years of age). Females and blacks are more than twice as likely to be affected. Additional risk factors include family history, smoking, and obesity. Hidradenitis suppurativa is associated with several comorbidities, including diabetes mellitus and Crohn disease. The clinical presentation of hidradenitis suppurativa ranges from rare, mild inflammatory nodules to widespread abscesses, sinus tracts, and scarring. Quality of life is often affected, and pat...
Source: American Family Physician - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Am Fam Physician Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: A. muciniphila exerts a key role in the maintenance of intestinal health and in host metabolic modulation. Future studies could open new horizons towards its potential therapeutic applications in gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal diseases. PMID: 31599433 [PubMed - in process]
Source: European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci Source Type: research
Abstract The gut microbiome has a significant impact on health and disease and can actively contribute to obesity, diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, cardiovascular disease, and neurological disorders. We do not yet have the necessary tools to fine-tune the microbial communities that constitute the microbiome, though such tools could unlock extensive benefits to human health. Here, we provide an overview of the current state of technological tools that may be used for microbiome engineering. These tools can enable investigators to define the parameters of a healthy microbiome and to determine how gut bacteria m...
Source: Trends in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Trends Immunol Source Type: research
Abstract Implicating dysbiosis of gut microbiome in digestive tract diseases/diet-related diseases (obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, enterocolitis, diabetes, etc.) may be expected. However, when gut microbiome dysbiosis is implicated in extraintestinal diseases like cancers, muscular dystrophy, mental disorders, vaginosis, etc., it is all the more challenging. An additional challenge would be to ascertain the role of gut microbiome in ocular diseases, which are as remote as the brain. The present review highlights studies that establish the connect between gut microbiome dysbiosis and inflammatory ocular disea...
Source: Journal of Biosciences - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tags: J Biosci Source Type: research
AbstractBackgroundObesity is considered a risk factor for many chronic diseases and obese patients are often considered higher risk surgical candidates. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the outcomes of obese (body mass index  ≥ 30 kg/m2) versus non-obese patients undergoing surgery for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).MethodsPubMed, Scopus, and Embase libraries were searched up to March 2019 for studies comparing outcomes of obese with non-obese patients undergoing surgery for IBD. A meta-analysis was conducted using Review Manager software to create forest plots and calculate odds ratios...
Source: Techniques in Coloproctology - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
We examined 9293 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements of total cholesterol, free- and esterified cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids, and particle concentration. Fourteen subclasses of decreasing size and their lipid constituents were analysed: six subclasses were very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), one intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL), three low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and four subclasses were high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Remnant lipoproteins were VLDL and IDL combined. Mean nonfasting cholesterol concentration was 72...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This short open access review is a good introduction to what is known of the changes to the microbial population of the gut that take place over the course of aging. Collectively, the activity of gut microbes is influential on health, arguably to a similar degree as exercise, though far less well quantified at this time. Altering the distribution of bacterial populations in older animals, to better resemble what is observed in young animals, leads to benefits to health, for example. Some of the specific mechanisms by which beneficial gut microbes improve health are being uncovered, such as the secretion of propionate, a co...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
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Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
AbstractBackground and AimsPrior studies have shown that about 90% of all carcinoid tumors occur in the GI tract. However, epidemiological studies of these tumors have been limited by small sample size. Our aim was to obtain a more robust epidemiologic survey of large bowel carcinoids (LBC), using population-based data in order to more accurately identify risk factors for these tumors.MethodsWe used a commercial database (Explorys Inc, Cleveland, OH) which includes electronic health record data from 26 major integrated US healthcare systems. We identified all patients aged 18 and older who were diagnosed with LBC, excludin...
Source: Digestive Diseases and Sciences - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
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