Many summer camps may not be prepared for kids with allergies

(Reuters Health) - Although most summer camps welcome kids with food allergies, they often don't require individualized emergency plans from these campers, a U.S. study suggests.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

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Publication date: January 2020Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, Volume 8, Issue 1Author(s): Rachel U. Lee, Shauna Stahlman
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Publication date: January 2020Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, Volume 8, Issue 1Author(s): Bruce G. Bender
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
ConclusionsGeneral-population infants introduced to peanut after age 12 months were more likely to have sensitization and probable clinical allergy to peanut at 3 years.
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Publication date: January 2020Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, Volume 8, Issue 1Author(s): Cristina A. Carter, Michael Pistiner, Julie Wang, Hemant P. SharmaIndividuals with food allergy are at risk for accidental exposures, potentially resulting in allergic reactions that may cause significant morbidity and mortality. Dining out, including restaurants or take-out, account for a large proportion of severe reactions. Errors due to gaps in knowledge or miscommunication can easily occur on behalf of food-allergic individuals or restaurant staff, resulting in accidental exposures and allergi...
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Publication date: January 2020Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, Volume 8, Issue 1Author(s): Jennifer J. Koplin, Carla M. Davis
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Publication date: January 2020Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, Volume 8, Issue 1Author(s): Anna Nowak-Wegrzyn, M. Cecilia Berin, Sam MehrFood protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) is a non–IgE-mediated food allergy that manifests with projectile, repetitive emesis that can be followed by diarrhea and may be accompanied by lethargy, hypotonia, hypothermia, hypotension, and metabolic derangements. FPIES usually starts in infancy although onset at older ages is being increasingly recognized. FPIES is not rare, with the cumulative incidence of FPIES in infants estimated to be ...
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Publication date: January 2020Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, Volume 8, Issue 1Author(s):
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Publication date: January 2020Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, Volume 8, Issue 1Author(s): Michael R. Perkin, Alkis Togias, Jennifer Koplin, Scott SichererGiven an apparent increase in food allergies worldwide, the focus on prevention strategies has intensified. Following the Learning Early About Peanut study, there is now a widespread acceptance that peanut should be introduced promptly into the diet of high-risk infants. However, most food allergies are caused by triggers other than peanut and additional prevention strategies are being evaluated. The appreciation of the role of an impa...
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
ConclusionsEPIT using HG is a safe method to enable oral administration even in patients with severe milk allergies.
Source: Pharmaceutical Research - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewThe prevalence of food allergy is increasing. At the current time, there are no approved treatments for food allergy. Major limitations of immunotherapy are long treatment periods (months or years), frequent clinic visits, high costs, increased risk of adverse events during treatment, and lack of durability of desensitization. Additionally, it is allergen-specific, and in those allergic to multiple allergens, the length and cost of treatment are further increased. In this review, we summarize recent developments in novel non-allergen-specific treatments for food allergy.Recent FindingsA number of m...
Source: Current Allergy and Asthma Reports - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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