Carotid Artery Stenosis after Radiation Therapy in a Patient with Lung Cancer: A Case Report and Literature Review.

We reported a case of carotid artery stenosis with stroke symptoms detected in a patient with lung cancer after radiotherapy. The patient was a 58-year-old male with a complaint of \"a single episode of temporary amaurosis in the right eye for 10 minutes". The clinical diagnosis at admission, after consideration of the patient's age, medical history, and auxiliary examination results, was as follows: lung cancer; right common carotid artery stenosis; left common carotid artery stenosis; left vertebral artery stenosis; and right subclavian artery occlusion with right subclavian steal syndrome (Grade 3). Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) were subsequently performed. During the 6-month follow-up, we observed no episode of temporary vision loss or other signs of stroke. Clinicians should pay great attention to delayed radiation-induced carotid stenosis. It is recommended that patients with a history of radiotherapy should undergo regular color Doppler ultrasound examination of the cervical region to diagnose, prevent, and treat RICS in an expedient fashion. This approach should improve survival rate and quality of life. PMID: 31816217 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Neuroendocrinology Letters - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Neuro Endocrinol Lett Source Type: research

Related Links:

Pocket-size ultrasound devices that cost 50 times less than the machines in hospitals (and connect to your phone). Virtual reality that speeds healing in rehab. Artificial intelligence that’s better than medical experts at spotting lung tumors. These are just some of the innovations now transforming medicine at a remarkable pace. No one can predict the future, but it can at least be glimpsed in the dozen inventions and concepts below. Like the people behind them, they stand at the vanguard of health care. Neither exhaustive nor exclusive, the list is, rather, representative of the recasting of public health and medic...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized HealthSummit19 technology Source Type: news
ConclusionsConsistent with previous large-scale meta-analyses and reviews, results supported the causal role of higher BMI in increasing the risk of several common causes of death, including cancers with increasing global incidence. We also found positive effects of BMI on mortality from respiratory disease, prostate cancer, and lung cancer, which has been inconsistently reported in the literature, suggesting that the causal role of higher BMI in mortality from these diseases may be underestimated. Furthermore, we expect different patterns of bias in the current observational and IV analyses; therefore, the similarities be...
Source: PLoS Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
(CNN) — The number of people around the world who have cancer is “rapidly growing,” with 18.1 million new cases and 9.6 million deaths in 2018 alone, researchers estimate in a new report. By the end of the century, cancer will be the No. 1 killer globally and the single biggest barrier to increasing our life expectancy, according to the report, released Wednesday by the World’s Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer. Cancer by the numbers The researchers used data from 185 countries, looking at all the places in the body cancer can occur and taking a deeper look at 3...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Cancer Local TV Source Type: news
In this study we demonstrate the use of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-based epigenome editing to alter cell response to inflammatory environments by repressing inflammatory cytokine cell receptors, specifically TNFR1 and IL1R1. This has applications for many inflammatory-driven diseases. It could be applied for arthritis or to therapeutic cells that are being delivered to inflammatory environments that need to be protected from inflammation." In chronic back pain, for example, slipped or herniated discs are a result of damaged tissue when inflammation causes cells to create ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Discussion part, where the researchers state that polydatin was found to be less toxic to normal cells. Does that mean it was somewhat toxic to normal cells, though less so, compared to cancer cells? I couldn’t find an answer…can anyone else find it? Reading on, we see that polydatin (or PD, for short), “functioned as a tumor suppressor in MM cells.  The proliferation of MM cells decreased and apoptosis increased progressively along with the increasing concentrations of PD.” Super duper…again. The study concludes that “PD effectively suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis an...
Source: Margaret's Corner - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Blogroll cancer Japanese knotweed myeloma polydatin Source Type: blogs
By ROSS KOPPEL Recently, the Journal of Patient Safety published a powerful and important article on the role of EHRs in patient harm, errors and malpractice claims. The article is open access. Electronic Health Record–Related Events in Medical Malpractice Claims by Mark L. Graber, Dana Siegal, Heather Riah, Doug Johnston, and Kathy Kenyon.  

The article is remarkable for several reasons: Considerably over 80% of the reported errors involve horrific patient harm: many deaths, strokes, missed and significantly delayed cancer diagnoses, massive hemorrhage, 10-fold overdoses, ignored or los...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
This article first appeared on the Golden Girls Network blog. Earlier on Huff/Post50: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
The September issue of Health Affairs focuses on the growing burden of noncommunicable diseases. Increased wealth worldwide has reduced the frequency of some infectious diseases, while chronic diseases—heart disease, respiratory ailments, cancer, diabetes, mental illness, and others—are more widespread. The September issue was supported by Eli Lilly and Company. Tracking Global Mortality Over 30 Years: A Mix of Increases And Decreases Mohammed Ali at Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health and coauthors examined data on deaths as a result of ischemic heart disease, stroke, diabetes, r...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Costs and Spending Elsewhere@ Health Affairs Equity and Disparities Featured Global Health Medicaid and CHIP Population Health Public Health Quality ACA DataWatch Global Mortality HSAs NCDs noncommunicable diseases WHO Source Type: blogs
Abstract Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have large economic impact at multiple levels. To systematically review the literature investigating the economic impact of NCDs [including coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), cancer (lung, colon, cervical and breast), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD)] on macro-economic productivity. Systematic search, up to November 6th 2014, of medical databases (Medline, Embase and Google Scholar) without language restrictions. To identify additional publications, we searched the reference lists of retriev...
Source: European Journal of Epidemiology - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
Background and Purpose— We aimed to assess the risk of recurrent ischemic events during hospitalization for stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) with optimal current management and to identify associated risk factors. Methods— We performed a retrospective analysis of all patients treated for acute ischemic stroke or TIA in 3 stroke units between 2010 and 2013. Recurrent stroke was defined as new persisting (≥24 hours) neurological deficit occurring>24 hours after the index event and not attributable to other causes of neurological deterioration. Cox proportional hazard regression identified risk fac...
Source: Stroke - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Acute Cerebral Infarction, Carotid Stenosis, Emergency treatment of Stroke, Antiplatelets Clinical Sciences Source Type: research
More News: Angioplasty | Brain | Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Carotid Angioplasty | Cervical Cancer | Endocrinology | Eyes | Lung Cancer | Neurology | Radiation Therapy | Stroke | Ultrasound