V114 and Acute Otitis Media (V114-032/PNEU-ERA)

Condition:   Acute Otitis Media (AOM) Interventions:   Biological: V114;   Other: Pediatric vaccines Sponsor:   Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials

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Conclusions: Presence of bacterial otopathogen, specifically nontypeable H. influenzae, in the middle ear during VTI was a predictor of children at-risk of repeat VTI. Here, we identify a modifiable microbiologic factor for repeat VTI that can be targeted to improve clinical management of rAOM.
Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Original Studies Source Type: research
Condition:   Acute Otitis Media (AOM) Interventions:   Biological: V114;   Other: Pediatric vaccines Sponsor:   Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Conclusion: According to WHO-recommended thresholds for interpreting cost-effectiveness, introduction of PCV-13 for children under 5 years in the Islamic Republic of Iran would be cost-effective. PMID: 31774134 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal - Category: Middle East Health Tags: East Mediterr Health J Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Combined data from 11 hospital and community-based studies of children aged less than 18 years who lived in communities with a high burden of acute and chronic respiratory illness showed that RSV was second only to HRV as the most prevalent virus detected across all settings. RSV was the most frequently detected virus in infants hospitalised with bronchiolitis, including those aged less than 6 months. In contrast, RSV was uncommonly detected in children in community settings. In northern Australia, effective maternal and infant RSV vaccines could substantially reduce RSV bronchiolitis-related hospitalisations, ...
Source: Rural and Remote Health - Category: Rural Health Tags: Rural Remote Health Source Type: research
Conclusion: In northern Australia, effective maternal and infant RSV vaccines could substantially reduce RSV bronchiolitis-related hospitalisations, including admissions of Indigenous infants.
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Paediatric respiratory epidemiology Source Type: research
In this study, we conjugated wild-type and truncated M. catarrhalis detoxified-LOS to a recombinant modified OMP26, rOMP26VTAL. Vaccination of mice with these conjugates resulted in a significant increase in anti-LOS and anti-rOMP26VTAL IgG levels. Importantly, mouse antisera showed complement-mediated bactericidal activity against all M. catarrhalis serotype A and B strains and a NTHi strain tested. Serotypes A &B make up more than 90% of isolates. These data suggest that the LOS and OMP based conjugate can be used as vaccine components and require further investigation in animal models. PMID: 31668366 [PubMed - ...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
Outbreaks of severe pneumococcal disease occur sporadically and can affect large numbers of individuals, although they are less frequent compared to the pre-antibiotic era.1 The responsible pathogen, Streptococcus pneumoniae, is a Gram-positive bacterium that commonly colonises the nasopharyngeal tract, especially in young children. Occasionally, however, it can invade locally to cause mucosal infections including sinusitis, otitis media or pneumonia. Rarely, invasion of the bloodstream can lead to more serious infections, including septicaemia and meningitis.
Source: Journal of Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Outbreaks of severe pneumococcal disease occur sporadically and can affect large numbers of individuals, although they are less frequent compared to the pre-antibiotic era.1 The responsible pathogen, Streptococcus pneumoniae, is a Gram-positive bacterium that commonly colonises the nasopharyngeal tract, especially in young children. Occasionally, however, it can invade locally to cause mucosal infections including sinusitis, otitis media or pneumonia. Rarely, invasion of the bloodstream can lead to more serious infections, including septicaemia and meningitis.
Source: Journal of Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The dPly/PhtD vaccine was immunogenic and well tolerated, however, incremental efficacy in preventing AAP-AOM over PCV13 was not demonstrated. CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION: NCT01545375 (www.clinicaltrials.gov). PMID: 31629570 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of bacterial infections in children, including meningitis, bacteremia, bacteremic pneumonia, empyema, and mucosal infections such as otitis media and non-bacteremic pneumonia. After the implementation of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs), worldwide, the burden of invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPDs) and non-invasive pneumococcal diseases due to vaccine serotypes (VTs) greatly decreased in children.1 However, since 2015, several European countries have reported an increased incidence of IPDs due to non-vaccine serotypes (NVTs), which seemed variable across countries in ter...
Source: The Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: European Paediatric Association Source Type: research
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