Genetic diversity of laboratory strains and implications for research: The case of Aedes aegypti

by Andrea Gloria-Soria, John Soghigian, David Kellner, Jeffrey R. Powell The yellow fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti), is the primary vector of dengue, Zika, and chikungunya fever, among other arboviral diseases. It is also a popular laboratory model in vector biology due to its ease of rearing and manipulation in the lab. Established laboratory strains have been used worldwide in thousands of studies for decades. Laboratory evolution of reference strains and contamination among strains are potential severe problems that could dramatically change experimental outcomes and thus is a concern in vector biology. We analyzed laboratory and field colonies ofAe.aegypti and anAe.aegypti-derived cell line (Aag2) using 12 microsatellites and ~20,000 SNPs to determine the extent of divergence among laboratory strains and relationships to their wild relatives. We found that 1) laboratory populations are less genetically variable than their field counterparts; 2) colonies bearing the same name obtained from different laboratories may be highly divergent; 3) present genetic composition of the LVP strain used as the genome reference is incompatible with its presumed origin; 4) we document changes in two wild caught colonies over ~16 generations of colonization; and 5) the Aag2Ae.aegypti cell line has experienced minimal genetic changes within and across laboratories. These results illustrate the degree of variability within and among strains ofAe.aegypti, with implications for cross-study com...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research

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Comparison Between Larval Survey Index and Positive Ovitrap Index in the Evaluation of Populations of Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti (Linnaeus, 1762) North of Paraná, Brazil. Environ Health Insights. 2020;14:1178630219886570 Authors: Nascimento KLC, da Silva JFM, Zequi JAC, Lopes J Abstract Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti (Linnaeus, 1762) is one of the world's most widely distributed mosquitoes and is the vector of the dengue virus, one of the most important reemerging diseases. Besides dengue, A. aegypti can also transmit urban yellow fever, chikungunya, and Zika virus, making it of great medical importa...
Source: Environmental Health Insights - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Environ Health Insights Source Type: research
ConclusionsThese results suggest that bothkdr mutations and metabolic resistance mechanisms are present in Laos but their impact on phenotypic resistance may differ in proportion at the population or individual level. Molecular analyses suggest that CNV affectingCCEAE3A previously associated with temephos resistance is also associated with malathion resistance while CNV affectingCYP6BB2 andCYP6P12 are associated with pyrethroid and possibly DDT resistance. The presence of high levels of insecticide resistance in the main arbovirus vector in Laos is worrying and may have important implications for dengue vector control in the country.
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Control of the Aedes aegypti mosquito is central to reducing the risk of dengue, zika, chikungunya, and yellow fever. Randomised controlled trials, including the Camino Verde trial in Mexico and Nicaragua, demons...
Source: Population Health Metrics - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusions/SignificanceOur results shed insights into the role ofompA gene in host-microbe interactions inAe.aegypti and confirm that CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing can be employed for genetic manipulation of non-model gut microbes. The ability to use this technology for site-specific integration of genes into the symbiont will facilitate the development of paratransgenic control strategies to interfere with arboviral pathogens such Chikungunya, dengue, Zika and Yellow fever viruses transmitted byAedes mosquitoes.
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusions/SignificanceOur findings highlight the need for furtherin vivo studies that more closely recapitulate natural arbovirus transmission settings in which arboviruses encounter mosquitoes harbouring persistent rather than acute insect-specific virus infections. Furthermore, we provide the well-characterised Aag2-derived clonal cell line as a valuable resource to the arbovirus research community.
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract The mosquitoes of the Anopheles and Aedes genus are some of the most deadly insects to humans because of their effectiveness as vectors of malaria and a range of arboviruses, including yellow fever, dengue, chikungunya, West Nile and zika. The use of insecticides from different chemical classes is a key component of the integrated strategy against An. gambiae and Ae. aegypti, but the problem of insecticide resistance means that new compounds with different modes of action are urgently needed to replace chemicals that fail to control resistant mosquito populations. We have previously shown that feeding inh...
Source: The Biochemical Journal - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Biochem J Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 18 October 2019Source: Microchemical JournalAuthor(s): Welma T.S. Vilar, Mayara F. Barbosa, Licarion Pinto, Mário César Ugulino de Araújo, Márcio José Coelho PontesABSTRACTAedes aegypti mosquitoes are vectors of diseases such as dengue, chikungunya, zika and yellow fever. With the increase in the incidence of these diseases the population has resorted to the use of repellents searching to protect themselves from mosquito attack. The Brazilian market offers a wide variety of products with different active principles in varying levels of concentration, tim...
Source: Microchemical Journal - Category: Chemistry Source Type: research
Conclusions and significanceAlthough IRM should be a fixture of all vector control programs, it is currently often absent from the strategic plans to control mosquito-borne diseases, especially arboviruses. Experiences from other public health disease vectors and agricultural pests underscore the need for urgent action in implementing IRM for invasiveAedes mosquitoes. Based on a plan developed for malaria vectors, here we propose some key activities to establish a global plan for IRM inAedes spp.
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
by Andrew J. Monaghan, Rebecca J. Eisen, Lars Eisen, Janet McAllister, Harry M. Savage, John-Paul Mutebi, Michael A. JohanssonAedes (Stegomyia) aegypti (L.) andAe.(Stegomyia) albopictus (Skuse) mosquitoes can transmit dengue, chikungunya, yellow fever, and Zika viruses. Limited surveillance has led to uncertainty regarding the geographic ranges of these vectors globally, and particularly in regions at the present-day margins of habitat suitability such as the contiguous United States. Empirical habitat suitability models based on environmental conditions can augment surveillance gaps to describe the estimated potential spe...
Source: PLoS Computational Biology - Category: Biology Authors: Source Type: research
by Elliott F. Miot, Fabien Aubry, St éphanie Dabo, Ian H. Mendenhall, Sébastien Marcombe, Cheong H. Tan, Lee C. Ng, Anna-Bella Failloux, Julien Pompon, Paul T. Brey, Louis Lambrechts The case-fatality rate of yellow fever virus (YFV) is one of the highest among arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses). Although historically, the Asia-Pacific region has remained free of YFV, the risk of introduction has never been higher due to the increasing influx of people from endemic regions and the recent outbreaks in Africa and South America. Singapore is a global hub for trade and tourism and therefore at high risk for Y...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
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