Protection of swine by potent neutralizing anti-Japanese encephalitis virus monoclonal antibodies derived from vaccination

In this study, prophylactic passive immunization was performed in a miniature swine model, using two vaccination-induced monoclonal antibodies (mAb), JEV-31 and JEV-169. These were selected as representatives for antibodies reactive with the major antigenic structures in the E protein of JEV and related flaviviruses. JEV-31 recognizes the lateral ridge of E protein domain III (EDIII) whilst JEV-169 has a broad footprint of binding involving residues throughout domains I (EDI) and II (EDII) of the E protein. Detection of neutralizing antibodies in the serum of immunized animals mimics the presence of neutralizing antibodies in vaccinated individuals. Passive immunization with both mAbs significantly reduced the severity of diseases that resemble the symptoms of human JE including fever, viremia, viral shedding, systemic infection, and neuroinvasion. In contrast to the uniformed decrease of viral loads in lymphoid and central nervous systems, distinct kinetics in the onset of fever and viremia between animals receiving JEV-31 and JEV-169 suggest potential differences in immune protection mechanisms between anti-EDI and anti-EDIII neutralizing antibodies elicited by vaccination. Our data demonstrate the feasibility of using swine models in characterizing the protective humoral immunity against JEV and increase our understanding of how clonal populations of anti-E mAbs derived from JE vaccination protect against infection in vivo.
Source: Antiviral Therapy - Category: Virology Source Type: research

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Source: Preventive Veterinary Medicine - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
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Source: Antiviral Therapy - Category: Virology Source Type: research
Abstract Sporadic human Zika virus (ZIKV) infections have been recorded in Africa and Asia since the 1950s. Major epidemics occurred only after ZIKV emerged in the Pacific islands and spread to the Americas. Specific biological determinants of the explosive epidemic nature of ZIKV have not been identified. Phylogenetic studies revealed incongruence in ZIKV placement in relation to Aedes-borne dengue viruses (DENV) and Culex-borne flaviviruses. We hypothesized that this incongruence reflects interspecies recombination resulting in ZIKV evasion of cross-protective T-cell immunity. We investigated ZIKV phylogenetic i...
Source: Antiviral Research - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Antiviral Res Source Type: research
In this study, prophylactic passive immunization was performed in a miniature swine model, using two vaccination-induced monoclonal antibodies (mAb), JEV-31 and JEV-169. These were selected as representatives for antibodies reactive with the major antigenic structures in the E protein of JEV and related flaviviruses. JEV-31 recognizes the lateral ridge of E protein domain III (EDIII) whilst JEV-169 has a broad footprint of binding involving residues throughout domains I (EDI) and II (EDII) of the E protein. Detection of neutralizing antibodies in the serum of immunized animals mimics the presence of neutralizing antibodies...
Source: Antiviral Research - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Antiviral Res Source Type: research
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Source: Antiviral Therapy - Category: Virology Source Type: research
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Source: Antiviral Research - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Antiviral Res Source Type: research
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Source: Parasitology International - Category: Parasitology Source Type: research
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Source: Virus Research - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Virus Res Source Type: research
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Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
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