Even a Little Alcohol May Raise Cancer Risk

Associations between drinking and cancer were particularly strong for cancers of the mouth, throat, stomach and colon.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alcoholic Beverages Cancer Source Type: news

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The dangers of alcohol begin at the first sip of the first drink. Although most responsible drinking habits shouldn’t be cause for major concern, everyone who drinks runs the risk of encountering the negative effects of alcohol. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans defines moderate drinking as up to 1 drink per day for women and up to 2 drinks per day for men.  A single drink is considered as: 12 ounces of beer (5% alcohol content) 8 ounces of malt liquor (7% alcohol content) 5 ounces of wine (12% alcohol content) 1.5 ounces of 80-proof (40% alcohol content) distilled spirits or liquor (e.g., gin, rum, vodka, ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Alcohol Alcohol Rehab Information Alcoholism alcohol abuse alcohol dependence alcohol dependency alcohol detox alcohol treatment alcohol treatment center alcohol treatment facility Alcoholics Anonymous Source Type: blogs
Conclusion Most head and neck pathologies show a broad cellular heterogeneity making it difficult to achieve an accurate diagnosis and efficient treatment (Graf and Zavodszky, 2017; Lo Nigro et al., 2017). Single cell analysis of circadian omics (Lande-Diner et al., 2015; Abraham et al., 2018), may be a crucial tool needed in the future to fully understand the circadian control of head and neck diseases. It becomes more obvious that there is only a small genetic component but a largely unknown epigenetics and/or environmental component for most of the head and neck pathologies (Moosavi and Motevalizadeh Ardekani, 2016; He...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
It’s hardly news that the gastrointestinal tract is important to human health: It transports food from the mouth to the stomach, converts it into absorbable nutrients and stored energy, and shuttles waste back out of the body. If you don’t properly nourish yourself, you don’t live. It’s that simple. But in recent years, scientists have discovered that the GI system has an even bigger, more complex job than previously appreciated. It’s been linked to numerous aspects of health that have seemingly nothing to do with digestion, from immunity to emotional stress to chronic illnesses, including can...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news
Publication date: April 2019Source: Cancer Epidemiology, Volume 59Author(s): Yu Rong Ho, Shang-Pin Ma, Kuan Y. ChangAbstractBackgroundAlthough the cancer mortality rate in Taiwan has been declining in recent years, no study has yet reported any regional differences in cancer mortality rates in Taiwan. We hypothesized that regional cancer mortality rates in Taiwan, an ethnically homogeneous society, exhibited no significant variations.MethodsWe investigated the trends in Taiwan regional cancer mortality between 1992 and 2014. We analyzed regional age-standardized cancer mortality rates for lung, liver, colon, stomach, oral,...
Source: Cancer Epidemiology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
(Natural News) You may want to rethink about downing another bottle of beer. Scientists have confirmed that alcohol increases the risk of getting cancer. Research revealed that frequent alcohol drinkers are more prone to contract cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx, esophagus, larynx, breast, liver, colon or rectum, and stomach. Several studies were conducted aiming...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
The World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) has bad news for lovers of bacon and booze: Eliminating processed meats and alcohol from your diet may help reduce your risk of developing cancer. The third report from the WCRF’s Continuous Update Project, an ongoing effort to inform consumers about lifestyle habits that may be related to cancer, provides numerous recommendations for people looking to minimize their risk of getting cancer. But two, in particular, are likely to cause a stir for many Americans. First, the WCRF recommends significantly or totally cutting back on processed meats including bacon, salami, hot dogs and...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime onetime Source Type: news
Conclusions and challenges. There is an urgent need to increase efforts towards primary and secondary prevention of cancer in Latin America; particularly, to identify patients in early stages of the disease and offer prompt treatment to them. To accomplish a better cancer control it is necessary the development, implementation and evaluation of a comprehensive National Cancer Control Plan in this region, which includes the investment in population-based cancer registries.However, this situation will not improve without adequate financial and better human resources. The economic burden of cancer in Latin America is estimate...
Source: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Impact and Implications for Health Disparities in the United States: Oral Presentations - Invited Abstracts Source Type: research
This study found that overall, 20% to 40% of carcinoma cases and about half of carcinoma deaths could potentially be prevented through certain lifestyle modifications. Here are the 4 lifestyle behaviors that if practiced throughout a lifetime, were found to be linked to a lower rate of cancer incidence and death: 1. Don't smoke The study revealed that smoking contributed to 48.5% of deaths from the 12 smoking-related cancers in the United States including lung, pancreas, bladder, stomach, colon/rectal and esophagus. The message here is plain and simple -- don't ever start smoking and if you already are, quit. Smoking ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This article was aimed to assess the long‐term risk of malignancies among patients with severe alcoholic liver disease (ALD), i.e., alcoholic liver cirrhosis and alcoholic hepatitis. A cohort of 8,796 male and 3,077 female ALD patients from 1996 to 2012 was identified from the Finnish National Hospital Discharge Register. This nationwide cohort was combined with the data from the Finnish Cancer Registry for incidence of malignancies during the years 1996–2013. The cancer cases diagnosed were compared with the number of cancers in the general population. The number of malignancies in our cohort was 1,052 vs. 368 exp...
Source: International Journal of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Cancer Epidemiology Source Type: research
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Source: International Journal of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research
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