Effects of cattle grazing on Ixodes ricinus-borne disease risk in forest areas of the Netherlands

Publication date: Available online 6 December 2019Source: Ticks and Tick-borne DiseasesAuthor(s): Hein Sprong, Sander Moonen, Sipke E. van Wieren, Tim R. HofmeesterAbstractCattle grazing has been suggested to reduce the risk for Lyme borreliosis by decreasing the density of questing Ixodes ricinus infected with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato. We tested the hypotheses that cattle grazing used in woodland management decreases the density of questing I. ricinus, and that it decreases the nympal infection prevalence of B. burgdorferi sensu lato. We further expected the nympal infection prevalence of tick-borne pathogens that utilize cattle as amplifying hosts, namely Anaplasma phagocytophilum, and Babesia sensu stricto, to increase. To test these hypotheses, we compared the densities of questing I. ricinus between twenty pairs of plots in grazed and ungrazed forest areas. The density of I. ricinus adults, but not nymphs, was lower in areas grazed by cattle than in ungrazed areas. Nymphs were tested for the presence of Borrelia burgdorferi s.l., Borrelia miyamotoi, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, and Babesia s.s. DNA from twelve paired areas. Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Babesia s.s. from qPCR-positive tick lysates were identified further to the ecotype and species level, respectively, by DNA sequencing. The infection prevalence of A. phagocytophilum was lower, and infection prevalence of Babesia s.s., identified as Babesia venatorum, was higher in grazed areas. In contrast, infectio...
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 2 August 2020Source: Ticks and Tick-borne DiseasesAuthor(s): Cheyne Kurokawa, Sukanya Narasimhan, Aurobind Vidyarthi, Carmen J. Booth, Sameet Mehta, Lea Meister, Husrev Diktas, Norma Strank, Geoffrey E. Lynn, Kathy DePonte, Joseph Craft, Erol Fikrig
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
LYME disease is a debilitating bacterial infection and with lockdowns easing and more people venturing outside, knowing the potential risks and symptoms is extremely important. If you experience any of these six, lesser-known warning signs you may be at risk.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
[AfricaFocus] Editor's Note: "COVID-19 is just one example of the rising trend of diseases - from Ebola to MERS to West Nile and Rift Valley fevers - caused by viruses that have jumped from animal hosts into the human population. ... The rising trend in zoonotic diseases is driven by the degradation of our natural environment - through land degradation, wildlife exploitation, resource extraction, climate change, and other stresses." - Press release from UN Environment Programme (UNEP) and International Livestock Re
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news
(Pensoft Publishers) A comprehensive study on a group of unique ectoparasitic fungi associated with insects and other arthropods in Belgium and the Netherlands was published in the open-access, peer-reviewed scholarly journal MycoKeys. In their paper, the scientists provide identification details about a total of 140 species, including nine species that represent new country records and two species new to science, with one of them named after the 2020 quarantine period, imposed to curb the COVID-19 pandemic.
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - Category: Biology Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates the potential danger from the inadvertent introduction of novel disease pathogens and vectors. Awareness of co-infections and Dermacentor reticulatus-related pathogens needs to be increased. PMID: 31694625 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Biomed Res - Category: Research Authors: Tags: BMC Vet Res Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 27 February 2019Source: Ticks and Tick-borne DiseasesAuthor(s): Ellie L. Milnes, Grace Thornton, Alexandre N. Léveillé, Pauline Delnatte, John R. Barta, Dale A. Smith, Nicole NemethAbstractCervid babesiosis, caused by the protozoan hemoparasite Babesia odocoilei and transmitted by the blacklegged tick Ixodes scapularis, is an emerging disease of Canadian cervids. This pathogen has not yet been described in humans. Data are lacking on the role of migratory birds in the adventitious spread of Ba. odocoilei-infected ticks, as well as on the infection status of I. scapularis in ...
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
The objectives of this study were to investigate the geographic distribution and magnitude of tick infestations in opportunistically sampled mammalian wildlife and companion animals (i.e., dogs) in southern Ontario and to test these ticks for evidence of zoonotic tick-borne pathogens. Ticks collected from wildlife carcasses, live-trapped wildlife and companion animals (2015-2016), as well as wildlife diagnostic cases (2011-2013), were identified to species and life stage. Ixodes scapularis ticks were tested by real-time PCR for Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Babesia microti, Borrelia miyamotoi and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu st...
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
We present case studies on the role of rodents in the cycles of Bartonella spp., of wild ungulates in the cycle of Babesia spp., and of various wildlife species in the life cycle of Leishmania infantum, Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Rickettsia spp. These examples highlight the usefulness of surveillance strategies focused on neglected zoonotic agents in wildlife as a source of valuable information for health professionals, nature managers and (local) decision-makers. These benefits could be further enhanced by increased collaboration between researchers and stakeholders across Europe and a more harmonised and coordinated a...
Source: Veterinary Parasitology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 15 December 2017 Source:Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases Author(s): Artem Rogovskyy, Maliha Batool, David C. Gillis, Patricia J. Holman, Igor V. Nebogatkin, Yuliya V. Rogovska, Maksym S. Rogovskyy Lyme borreliosis (LB) is caused by tick-borne spirochetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex. LB is the most prevalent vector-borne illness in Ukraine, but current data on the prevalence of LB pathogens in their tick vector, Ixodes ricinus, are lacking. I. ricinus ticks may also carry Borrelia miyamotoi, an emerging relapsing fever group spirochete that has been implicated in human ill...
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
Mepron, a thick liquid antimicrobial drug used to treat Babesia and malaria, as well as a fungal infection called Pneumocystitis carinii. In 2011, the United Kingdom stopped requiring that dogs brought into the country be inspected for ticks. Earlier this year, several dogs tested positive for babesia, a malaria-like disease transmitted to ticks that previously had only been found in foreign. These dogs had never left the U.K. While babesiosis is a new worry to U.K. dog owners, it's been a threat to human beings for years -- it just hasn't become a health-scare-of-the-week like Zika, West Nile, avian and swine flu. Most...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
More News: Babesiosis | Borrelia | Lyme Disease | Netherlands Health | Tickborne Diseases | Zoology | Zoonoses