Risk of subsequent malignant neoplasms after an index potentially-human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers

ConclusionsP-HPV-AC survivors experienced excess risk of SPMN. These findings have the potential to affect future surveillance practices and improve preventive healthcare for survivors of P-HPV-ACs.
Source: Cancer Epidemiology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research

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By Jacqueline Howard, CNN (CNN) — The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, known as ACIP, voted unanimously on Wednesday to recommend HPV vaccines for both boys and girls and men and women through age 26. Previously the CDC recommended that teen girls and young women who had not been adequately vaccinated receive the human papillomavirus vaccine through age 26, but the recommendation for teen boys and young men only went through age 21. The CDC’s recommendation that children start receiving two doses of the HPV vaccine around 11 or 12...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN HPV vaccine Source Type: news
There is a vaccine that can prevent persistent infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV), the etiological agent in many HPV-related cancers worldwide and within the United States. Globally, approximately 570,000 females and 60,000 males are diagnosed annually with a cancer that is related to the HPV.1 More than 90% of all cases of cervical and anal cancers are caused by persistent infection with the HPV, and it causes 75% of all cases of vaginal cancer, 70% of all cases of oropharyngeal and vulvar cancer, and 60% of penile cancer.
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: Quality Care for Women ’s Health Source Type: research
Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes cervical cancer, anal cancer, vulvar cancer, vaginal cancer, penile cancer and oropharyngeal cancer. SCC in the genital region in particular is recognized to be caused by HPV infection, and intraepithelial lesions of the penis and vulva are termed penile intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN), respectively. Although SCC of the nail apparatus is recognized as being associated with high-risk HPVs, it is not well-known in general medicine, and its analysis has been insufficient.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Source Type: research
Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes cervical cancer, anal cancer, vulvar cancer, vaginal cancer, penile cancer, and oropharyngeal cancer. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in the genital region in particular is recognized to be caused by HPV infection, and intraepithelial lesions of the penis and vulva are termed penile intraepithelial neoplasia and vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia, respectively. Although SCC of the nail apparatus is recognized as being associated with high-risk HPVs, it is not well-known in general medicine, and its analysis has been insufficient.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
ConclusionsHIV ‐infected Hispanics have an elevated risk for HPV‐related cancers. Similarly to the general population, HIV‐infected Hispanics have higher rates of cervical and penile cancer than NHWs and NHBs. HPV vaccination should be promoted among HIV‐infected individuals to reduce the burden of HPV‐r elated cancers.
Source: Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Abstract Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a known cause of cervical cancer, as well as some oropharyngeal, vulvar, vaginal, penile, and anal cancers. To assess trends, characterized by average annual percent change (AAPC), in HPV-associated cancer incidence during 1999-2015, CDC analyzed data from cancer registries covering 97.8% of the U.S. POPULATION: A total of 30,115 new cases of HPV-associated cancers were reported in 1999 and 43,371 in 2015. During 1999-2015, cervical cancer rates decreased 1.6% per year; vaginal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) rates decreased 0.6% per year; oropharyngeal SCC rates increased...
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep Source Type: research
Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States and is a well-known cause of oropharyngeal, cervical, vaginal, vulvar, penile, and anal cancers. Despite the proven efficacy of the HPV vaccine, vaccination rates remain persistently low. Much literature has focused on attitudes toward the HPV vaccine; however, researchers have also investigated strategies clinicians can use to improve vaccination attitudes and acceptance. Such strategies include provider education, vaccine reminder/recall, and chart audit and feedback.
Source: Journal of Pediatric Health Care - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Department Source Type: research
Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are responsible for the development of almost all cervical cancers. HPV is also found in 85% of anal cancer and in 50% of penile, vulvar, and vaginal cancers, and they are increasingly found in a subset of head and neck cancers, i.e., oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCC). The model for how HPV causes cancer is derived from several decades of study on cervical cancer, and it is just presumed that this model is not only completely valid for cervical cancer but for all other HPV-driven cancers as well. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has now provided the necessary tools to characterize ...
Source: Cytogenetic and Genome Research - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
This report presents a patient with multiple HPV types in a squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. PMID: 28084874 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Scand J Urol Source Type: research
We systematically reviewed the literature on anal, penile, cervical, and oropharyngeal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in Greece to provide a comprehensive overview of HPV prevalence and to explore the reporting of HPV in Greek men and women. A total of five databases, including PubMed and Scopus, were searched up until 1 January 2015 for studies looking at HPV prevalence, incidence, or risk factors by anatomical site. We identified 50 eligible studies for inclusion. The majority of them were cervical studies (n=26) followed by head and neck studies (n=13) with only two studies exclusively focusing on anal sites and t...
Source: European Journal of Cancer Prevention - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Review Article: Carcinogenesis Source Type: research
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