18F-FDG Imaging of a Case of Disseminated Nocardiosis

Nocardiosis is an uncommon infection caused by ubiquitous environmental aerobic gram-positive filamentous bacteria, present in soil and water. Skin and lungs are usually the main targets of localized infections. Rarely, disseminated forms can occur in immunocompromised individuals. A 63-year-old man with a history of late-onset asthma and nasal and sinus polyposis treated with oral low-dose corticosteroid regimen presented with fever, headache, myalgia, skin erythematous plaques, and pustules. Brain MRI revealed multiple abscesses and pachymeningitis. 18F-FDG PET/CT was performed to assess the extent of the infection. Cutaneous samples and sputum culture isolated Nocardia brasiliensis, confirming diagnosis of disseminated nocardiosis.
Source: Clinical Nuclear Medicine - Category: Nuclear Medicine Tags: Interesting Images Source Type: research

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A 49-year-old female with history of daily inhaled corticosteroid use for asthma presented to a concussion clinic 7 wk after sport-related head injury with headache, visual blurring, dizziness, nausea, fatigue, polydipsia, and polyuria. Examination reveale...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news
A 49-year-old female with history of daily inhaled corticosteroid use for asthma presented to a concussion clinic 7 wk after sport-related head injury with headache, visual blurring, dizziness, nausea, fatigue, polydipsia, and polyuria. Examination revealed difficulty with vestibuloocculomotor testing due to nausea and visual straining. Cranial computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging was unremarkable. Laboratory testing revealed critically low serum cortisol, hypernatremia, and urine studies suggesting diabetes insipidus. The patient was referred to the emergency department. Intravenous fluid resuscitation, corticos...
Source: Current Sports Medicine Reports - Category: Sports Medicine Tags: Case Report Source Type: research
Abstract A 49-year-old female with history of daily inhaled corticosteroid use for asthma presented to a concussion clinic 7 wk after sport-related head injury with headache, visual blurring, dizziness, nausea, fatigue, polydipsia, and polyuria. Examination revealed difficulty with vestibuloocculomotor testing due to nausea and visual straining. Cranial computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging was unremarkable. Laboratory testing revealed critically low serum cortisol, hypernatremia, and urine studies suggesting diabetes insipidus. The patient was referred to the emergency department. Intravenous fluid resus...
Source: Current Sports Medicine Reports - Category: Sports Medicine Authors: Tags: Curr Sports Med Rep Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 19 September 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Claus Bachert, Joseph K Han, Martin Desrosiers, Peter W Hellings, Nikhil Amin, Stella E Lee, Joaquim Mullol, Leon S Greos, John V Bosso, Tanya M Laidlaw, Anders U Cervin, Jorge F Maspero, Claire Hopkins, Heidi Olze, G Walter Canonica, Pierluigi Paggiaro, Seong H Cho, Wytske J Fokkens, Shigeharu Fujieda, Mei ZhangSummaryBackgroundPatients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) generally have a high symptom burden and poor health-related quality of life, often requiring recurring systemic corticosteroid use and repeated sinus sur...
Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Shanshan Zhang1, Dongli Yuan2 and Ge Tan1* 1Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China 2The Institute of Medical Information, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China Primary systemic vasculitis can affect every structure in both the central and peripheral nervous system, causing varied neurological manifestations of neurological dysfunction. Early recognition of the underlying causes of the neurological symptoms can facilitate timely treatment and improve the prognosis. This review highlights the clinical manifestations of primary systemic vasc...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this review are limited to montelukast. There was a lack of evidence addressing the review question, and the quality of the available evidence for most of the measured outcomes was low. Some primary and secondary outcomes were not addressed at all, including long-term control.We found no evidence of a difference between montelukast (10 mg) and placebo on disease severity, pruritus improvement, and topical corticosteroid use. Very low-quality evidence means we are uncertain of the effect of montelukast (10 mg) compared with conventional treatment on disease severity. Participants in only one stu...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
If you’re an athlete taking the WADA allowed 1600 micrograms of salbumatol each day that’s the equivalent of 16 doses from a standard metered dose inhaler. If you’re taking so much that it leads to you failing a drug test, then you have serious problems. Most lay people take two doses at a time to relieve symptoms, such as chest tightness, coughing, wheezing and breathlessness, so that’s still using the stuff 8 times a day. I wonder though, whether you are an athlete or not, if you need to take that much bronchodilator each day to get relief and a decent peak flow rate, then it’s odd that you...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Science Source Type: blogs
If you’re an athlete taking the WADA allowed 1600 micrograms of salbumatol each day that’s the equivalent of 16 doses from a standard metered dose inhaler. If you’re taking so much that it leads to you failing a drug test, then you have serious problems. Most lay people take two doses at a time to relieve symptoms, such as chest tightness, coughing, wheezing and breathlessness, so that’s still using the stuff 8 times a day. I wonder though, whether you are an athlete or not, if you need to take that much bronchodilator each day to get relief and a decent peak flow rate, then it’s odd that you...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Science Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: In CRSwNP pts with asthma, DPL significantly improved all asthma-related items. Improvement correlated with reduced nasal polyp burden.
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Allergy and immunology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 5 April 2017 Source:The Lancet Respiratory Medicine Author(s): Geoffrey L Chupp, Eric S Bradford, Frank C Albers, Daniel J Bratton, Jie Wang-Jairaj, Linda M Nelsen, Jennifer L Trevor, Antoine Magnan, Anneke ten Brinke Background Mepolizumab, an anti-interleukin-5 monoclonal antibody approved as add-on therapy to standard of care for patients with severe eosinophilic asthma, has been shown in previous studies to reduce exacerbations and dependency on oral corticosteroids compared with placebo. We aimed to further assess mepolizumab in patients with severe eosinophilic asthma by examining ...
Source: The Lancet Respiratory Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
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