The Effects of Imagery Rescripting on Memory Outcomes in Social Anxiety Disorder

Publication date: Available online 7 December 2019Source: Journal of Anxiety DisordersAuthor(s): Mia Romano, David A. Moscovitch, Jonathan D. Huppert, Susanna G. Reimer, Morris MoscovitchAbstractImagery rescripting (IR) is an effective intervention for social anxiety disorder (SAD) that targets negative autobiographical memories. IR has been theorized to work through various memory mechanisms, including modifying the content of negative memory representations, changing memory appraisals, and improving negative schema or core beliefs about self and others. However, no prior studies have investigated the unique effects of rescripting itself relative to other IR intervention components on these proposed mechanisms. In this preliminary study, 33 individuals with SAD were randomized to receive a single session of IR, imaginal exposure (IE), or supportive counselling (SC). Memory outcomes were assessed at 1- and 2-weeks post-intervention and at 3-months follow-up. Results demonstrated that the content of participants’ autobiographical memory representations changed in distinct ways across the three conditions, such that IR facilitated increases only in positive/neutral memory details, but IE facilitated increases in both positive/neutral and negative memory details and SC facilitated no changes in memory details. Although memory appraisals did not differ across conditions, participants who received IR were more likely to update their negative memory-derived core beliefs. Thes...
Source: Journal of Anxiety Disorders - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

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We examined the association of inflammatory cytokines, microbiome, and other biomakers with measures of depression, social anxiety, and executive functions. We observed a significant increase in cytokine and chemokine expression levels in saliva and plasma in the alcohol group (AG) samples. Also, the salivary bacterial composition in the AG revealed an abundance of Prevotella. Depression symptomatology was markedly higher in the AG, but social anxiety levels were negligible. AG also exhibited executive dysfunctions, which negatively correlated with increased plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and increased salivar...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
This study examined the content-specificity of dysfunctional social beliefs to Social Anxiety Disorder (SoAD) in a large, clinically referred sample of children with a variety of anxiety, mood and externalizing disorders. The effects of c...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 17 January 2020Source: Journal of Anxiety DisordersAuthor(s): Jiemiao Chen, Esther van den Bos, P. Michiel WestenbergAbstractAlthough visual avoidance of faces is a hallmark feature of social anxiety disorder (SAD) on clinical and theoretical grounds, empirical support is equivocal. This review aims to clarify under which conditions socially anxious individuals display visual avoidance of faces. Through a systematic search in Web of Science and PubMed up to March 2019 we identified 61 publications that met the inclusion criteria. We discuss the influence of three factors on the extent to ...
Source: Journal of Anxiety Disorders - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
“Care about what other people think and you will always be their prisoner.” ~ Lao Tzu We carefully pick out what we wear to the gym to make sure we look good in the eyes of the other gym goers. We beat ourselves up after meetings running through everything we said (or didn’t say), worried that coworkers will think we aren’t smart or talented enough. We post only the best picture out of the twenty-seven selfies we took and add a flattering filter to get the most likes to prove to ourselves that we are pretty and likable. We live in other people’s heads. And all it does is make us judge ourselve...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General LifeHelper Publishers Self-Esteem Self-Help Tiny Buddha Social Anxiety Worry Source Type: blogs
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Source: Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Source Type: research
This study analyze...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
You're reading How to Beat Your Social Anxiety in 2020, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Bidding farewell to the past year and welcoming the next can be incredibly exciting and promising. If the thought of attending a New Year's Eve bash leaves you with sweaty palms and heart palpitations, however, you're not alone. About 15 million people in America, including myself, struggle with social anxiety. This disorder can make the new year an extremely stressful event.  Luckily, if you've resolved to bea...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: featured psychology self confidence self improvement anxiety pickthebrain social anxiety Source Type: blogs
Abstract Neural activity within the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) is a critical determinant of stressor-induced anxiety. Pharmacological activation of the vmPFC during stress protects against stress-induced social anxiety suggesting that altering the excitatory/inhibitory (E/I) tone in the vmPFC may promote stress resilience. E/I balance is maintained, in part, by endogenous cannabinoid (eCB) signaling with the calcium dependent retrograde release of 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) suppressing presynaptic neurotransmitter release. We hypothesized that raising 2-AG levels, via inhibition of its degradation e...
Source: Neuropharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Neuropharmacology Source Type: research
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic Mindfulness Jon Kabat Zinn Meditation secular mindfulness Social Anxiety Source Type: blogs
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Source: Revista de Neurologia - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Rev Neurol Source Type: research
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