High-intensity exercise in the evening does not disrupt sleep in endurance runners

ConclusionWhen performed in the early evening, high-intensity exercise does not disrupt and may even improve subsequent nocturnal sleep in endurance-trained runners, despite increased cardiac autonomic activity. Additionally, low-intensity exercise induced positive changes in sleep behaviour that are comparable to those obtained following high-intensity exercise.
Source: European Journal of Applied Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research

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Authors: Liu SH, Lai CT, Chen HR, Lin WL, Yamada S, Lugtu IC, Chou YH, Yang CCH, Kuo TB, Chen SA, Lo LW Abstract Sleep and estrogen levels have an impact on neural regulation and are associated with cardiovascular (CV) events. We investigated the effects of estrogen on heart rate variability (HRV) and circadian cycle in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Polysomnographic recording was performed in seven male and seven female SHRs during sleep. The electroencephalogram (EEG) and electromyogram (EMG) were evaluated to define active waking (AW), quiet sleep (QS), and paradoxical sleep (PS) stages. Cardiac activit...
Source: International Heart Journal - Category: Cardiology Tags: Int Heart J Source Type: research
The human and dog have sinus arrhythmia; however, the beat-to-beat interval changes were hypothesized to be different. Geometric analyses (R–R interval tachograms, dynamic Poincaré plots) to examine rate changes on a beat-to-beat basis were analyzed along with time and frequency domain heart rate variability from 40 human and 130 canine 24-h electrocardiographic recordings. Humans had bell-shaped beat-interval distributions, narrow interval bands across time with continuous interval change and linear changes in rate. In contrast, dogs had skewed non-singular beat distributions, wide interval bands {despite fas...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
The human and dog have sinus arrhythmia; however, the beat-to-beat interval changes were hypothesized to be different. Geometric analyses (R-R interval tachograms, dynamic Poincaré plots) to examine rate changes on a beat-to-beat basis were analyzed along with time and frequency domain heart rate variability from 40 human and 130 canine 24-hour electrocardiographic recordings. Humans had bell-shaped beat-interval distributions, narrow interval bands across time with continuous interval change and linear changes in rate. In contrast, dogs had skewed nonsingular beat distributions, wide interval bands {despite faster ...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Most patients with diabetes still rely on finger-prick blood tests to measure their glucose levels. Some use wearable continuous glucose monitors, but even those typically require twice daily calibrations against the finger-prick method. It has been ...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Informatics Medicine Source Type: blogs
ConclusionIn Holter ECG recordings of survivors of acute MI, signs suggestive of SDB were frequently present, but not associated with mortality. A flat nocturnal HR tachogram was a strong, independent predictor of 5-year all-cause mortality.
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
The 53rd edition of the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) is officially underway! With over  4,400 exhibiting companies from industries ranging from gaming to digital health showcasing their latest products and technologies, you might need some assistance to stay afloat in the flood of new announcements. Donning our rescue caps, The Medical Futurist team is coming to your aid! We’ve compiled the most exciting (and questionable) CES news relating to digital health that we’ve found at this year’s show. Let’s take a look! The Wows Every year at CES, companies come up with promising technologie...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine ces digital health Healthcare technology digital technology digital health companies digital health tech Source Type: blogs
AbstractBackgroundWe have previously demonstrated the feasibility of a nurse ‐led risk factor modification (RFM) program for improving weight loss and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) care among atrial fibrillation (AF) patients.ObjectiveWe now report its impact on arrhythmia outcomes in a subgroup of patients undergoing catheter ablation.MethodsParticipating patients with obesity and/or need for OSA management (high ‐risk per Berlin Questionnaire or untreated OSA) underwent in‐person consultation and monthly telephone calls with the nurse for up to 1 year. Arrhythmias were assessed by office ECGs and ≥2 wearable mon...
Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
In conclusion, the ECG belt provided signals comparable to patched ECG and could be used for the assessment of sleep apnea severity, especially during follow-up.
Source: Sensors - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
This article has been curated to share our favourite stories from 2019, shared as a month-by-month basis so that you can get it all into focus! January Source: www.mashable.com We kickstarted the year by covering one of the most exciting events in tech, the Consumer Electronics Show or CES. From A.I.-powered hearing aids to a blood pressure monitor that can track ECGs and doubles as a digital stethoscope to a speaking toilet, we had our fair share of excitement and… surprise at last year’s event! Speaking of A.I., we also highlighted the AMA’s efforts in helping physicians understand A.I. better...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine digital health Healthcare technology digital health technologies Source Type: blogs
Authors: Taguchi M, Sasa T, Izuhara M, Shioji K, Iwamuro A, Uegaito T, Matsuda M Abstract We herein report a case of congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) in which the QT interval was prolonged by Takotsubo syndrome (TTS), inducing ventricular fibrillation (VF). The patient was a 55-year-old woman who had been diagnosed with LQTS. Cardiopulmonary arrest occurred while coughing during sleep. VF was observed, and her heartbeat returned after two defibrillations. An electrocardiogram showed marked QT prolongation and large negative T waves. Echocardiography demonstrated hyperkinesis at the base of the left ventricle and ...
Source: Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Intern Med Source Type: research
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