Inflammatory bone marrow microenvironment.

Inflammatory bone marrow microenvironment. Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program. 2019 Dec 06;2019(1):294-302 Authors: Leimkühler NB, Schneider RK Abstract Self-renewing hematopoietic stem cells and their progeny, lineage-specific downstream progenitors, maintain steady-state hematopoiesis in the bone marrow (BM). Accumulating evidence over the last few years indicates that not only primitive hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), but also cells defining the microenvironment of the BM (BM niche), sense hematopoietic stress signals. They respond by directing and orchestrating hematopoiesis via not only cell-intrinsic but also cell-extrinsic mechanisms. Inflammation has many beneficial roles by activating the immune system in tissue repair and as a defense mechanism. However, chronic inflammation can have detrimental effects by stressing HSPCs, leading to cell (DNA) damage resulting in BM failure or even to leukemia. Emerging data have demonstrated that the BM microenvironment plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of hematopoietic malignancies, in particular, through disrupted inflammatory signaling, specifically in niche (microenvironmental) cells. Clonal selection in the context of microenvironmental alterations can occur in the context of toxic insults (eg, chemotherapy), not only aging but also inflammation. In this review, we summarize mechanisms that lead to an inflammatory BM microenvironment and discuss how this affects normal...
Source: Hematology ASH Education Program - Category: Hematology Tags: Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program Source Type: research

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Conclusion A great deal of progress is being made in the matter of treating aging: in advocacy, in funding, in the research and development. It can never be enough, and it can never be fast enough, given the enormous cost in suffering and lost lives. The longevity industry is really only just getting started in the grand scheme of things: it looks vast to those of us who followed the slow, halting progress in aging research that was the state of things a decade or two ago. But it is still tiny compared to the rest of the medical industry, and it remains the case that there is a great deal of work yet to be done at all...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusion A great deal of progress is being made in the matter of treating aging: in advocacy, in funding, in the research and development. It can never be enough, and it can never be fast enough, given the enormous cost in suffering and lost lives. The longevity industry is really only just getting started in the grand scheme of things: it looks vast to those of us who followed the slow, halting progress in aging research that was the state of things a decade or two ago. But it is still tiny compared to the rest of the medical industry, and it remains the case that there is a great deal of work yet to be done at all...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Of Interest Source Type: blogs
This study shows that CA are released from periventricular and subpial regions to the cerebrospinal fluid and are present in the cervical lymph nodes, into which cerebrospinal fluid drains through the meningeal lymphatic system. We also show that CA can be phagocytosed by macrophages. We conclude that CA can act as containers that remove waste products from the brain and may be involved in a mechanism that cleans the brain. Moreover, we postulate that CA may contribute in some autoimmune brain diseases, exporting brain substances that interact with the immune system, and hypothesize that CA may contain brain markers that m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, researchers studied 438,952 participants in the UK Biobank, who had a total of 24,980 major coronary events - defined as the first occurrence of non-fatal heart attack, ischaemic stroke, or death due to coronary heart disease. They used an approach called Mendelian randomisation, which uses naturally occurring genetic differences to randomly divide the participants into groups, mimicking the effects of running a clinical trial. People with genes associated with lower blood pressure, lower LDL cholesterol, and a combination of both were put into different groups, and compared against those without thes...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
The nuclear DNA encoding near all of the protein machinery necessary to cell function is constantly damaged and constantly repaired. The repair mechanisms are highly efficient, and are backed up by numerous other systems intended to destroy cells that suffer particularly critical DNA damage, mutations that can lead to cancer or severe dysfunction. Nonetheless, damage accumulates. Near all of this damage is irrelevant, as it occurs randomly in single somatic cells with a limited life span, in genes that the cell isn't using. Unfortunately, there are ways for DNA damage to become significant. The first is obviously ca...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
We examined human lung tissue from COPD patients and normal control subjects, and found a substantial increase in p16-expressing alveolar cells in COPD patients. Using a transgenic mouse deficient for p16, we demonstrated that lungs of mice lacking p16 were structurally and functionally resistant to CS-induced emphysema due to activation of IGF1/Akt regenerative and protective signaling. Fat Tissue Surrounds Skeletal Muscle to Accelerate Atrophy in Aging and Obesity https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/09/fat-tissue-surrounds-skeletal-muscle-to-accelerate-atrophy-in-aging-and-obesity/ Researchers her...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Antonio Lucena-Cacace1, Masayuki Umeda1, Lola E. Navas2,3 and Amancio Carnero2,3* 1Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan 2CIBERONC, ISCIII, Madrid, Spain 3Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla (IBIS), Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío (HUVR), CSIC, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain Glioma Cancer Stem-Like Cells (GSCs) are a small subset of CD133+ cells with self-renewal properties and capable of initiating new tumors contributing to Glioma progression, maintenance, hierarchy, and complexity. GSCs are highly res...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Mark E. Gray1,2*, James Meehan2,3, Paul Sullivan4, Jamie R. K. Marland4, Stephen N. Greenhalgh1, Rachael Gregson1, Richard Eddie Clutton1, Carol Ward2, Chris Cousens5, David J. Griffiths5, Alan Murray4 and David Argyle1 1The Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies and Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom 2Cancer Research UK Edinburgh Centre and Division of Pathology Laboratories, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom 3School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Institute of Sensors, Signals and Systems, Heriot-Watt Univer...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Qingbin Cui1,2, Chao-Yun Cai2, Hai-Ling Gao2,3, Liang Ren1, Ning Ji2,4, Pranav Gupta2, Yuqi Yang2, Suneet Shukla5, Suresh V. Ambudkar5, Dong-Hua Yang2 and Zhe-Sheng Chen2* 1School of Public Health, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangdong, China 2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, St. John's University, Queens, NY, United States 3Department of Histology and Embryology, Clinical Medical College, Weifang Medical University, Weifang, China 4Tianjin Key Laboratory on Technologies Enabling Development of Clinical Therapeutics and Diagnostics, School of Pharmacy, Tian...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Discussion In this section, we discuss the mechanisms responsible for lymphomagenesis in the various inborn errors of immunity and provide an overview of the treatment. Defects in Immune Responses That Predispose to Lymphomagenesis in PIDDs The complex immune mechanisms and their interplay that predisposes to neoplastic transformation of B or T cells and development of lymphomas in PIDD patients has not been fully elucidated. However, it is expected that the etiology in most cases is multifactorial and related to a dynamic regulation of immune response and environmental triggers (Figure 3). An underlying intrinsic susce...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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