HMGB1 upregulates NF-kB by inhibiting IKB-α and associates with diabetic retinopathy

This study aimed to investigate the effect of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein and its mechanism in diabetic retinopathy (DR) were investigated.Main methodsHuman retinal endothelial cells (HREC) were uesd for chip-seq. Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into control group, HMGB1 group, diabetes mellitus (DM) combined with HMGB1 siRNA group, and DM group. Next, eyeballs were removed and retinas were detached for western blot. The DM model of cell was built by increasing the glucose concentration in cell culture medium. The regulation of HMGB1 was achieved by short hairpin (sh)-HMGB1 transfection, then, the transfected cells were harvested for luciferase assay, western blot and qRT-PCR analyses as well as proliferation and apoptosis detection.Key findingsChip-seq and luciferase assay showed the possible transcription factor functions of HMGB1 and IKB-α was one of the HMGB1 binding sites. In vivo and in vitro results indicated high expression of HMGB1 and NF-kB and low expression of IKB-α in DR and the expression of IKB-α and NF-kB was regulated by HMGB1. Moreover, cell assays showed that HMGB1 inhibited cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis.SignificanceThe results from the present study showed that HMGB1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of DR as a transcription factor through NF-kB pathway. Therefore, blockade of HMGB1 may be a new method for the treatment of DR.
Source: Life Sciences - Category: Biology Source Type: research

Related Links:

Conclusion: Services for detecting and managing DR can be successfully integrated into the existing public health system.
Source: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology - Category: Opthalmology Authors: Source Type: research
Clare Gilbert, Iris Gordon, Chandoshi Rhea Mukherjee, Vishal GovindhariIndian Journal of Ophthalmology 2020 68(13):63-66 Diabetes mellitus now affects 65 million adults in India, which is likely to increase to over 130 million by 2045. Vision impairment and blindness from diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic macular edema (DME) will increase unless systems and services are put in place to reduce the incidence of DR and DME, and to increase access to diagnosis and effective treatment. In India, sight-threatening DR (STDR) affects 5%–7% of people with diabetes, i.e., 3–4.5 million. This will increase a...
Source: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology - Category: Opthalmology Authors: Source Type: research
Ankush K Desai, Ugam P S Usgaonkar, Vivek S Naik, Madan Deshpande, Rajan ShuklaIndian Journal of Ophthalmology 2020 68(13):88-91 Diabetes mellitus continues to increase in epidemic proportions globally as well as in India. Poor glycemic control in long-standing diabetes mellitus eventually leads to chronic complications such as retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, and cardiovascular disease. Diabetic retinopathy is emerging as an important cause of avoidable visual impairment and blindness in India across all strata of society. Much of this vision loss can be prevented by improving control of known risk factors, annual f...
Source: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology - Category: Opthalmology Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 25 August 2019Source: Canadian Journal of DiabetesAuthor(s): Sanam Zeib Khan, Nida Ajmal, Rozeena ShaikhAbstractDiabetic retinopathy (DR) is a microvascular complication of the retina of the eye and represents a major cause of blindness worldwide. It is a complex disorder characterized by both genetic and environmental factors. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene is among the main candidate genes for DR, as it is also involved in several other diseases, such as microvascular complications of diabetes mellitus and cancer. The VEGF gene is extremely polymorphic. The 18-bp fra...
Source: Canadian Journal of Diabetes - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
x Brown Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) poses significant challenges to individuals and broader society, much of which is borne by disadvantaged and marginalised population groups including Indigenous people. The increasing prevalence of T2DM among Indigenous people has meant that rates of diabetes-related complications such as blindness from end-stage diabetic retinopathy (DR) continue to be important health concerns. Australia, a high-income and resource-rich country, continues to struggle to adequately respond to the health needs of its Indigenous people living with T2DM. Trends among Indigenous Australians highligh...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
AbstractComplications of diabetes mellitus (DM) have had an important impact on public health; in particular, diabetic retinopathy (DR), which can cause blindness and visual impairment, has an annual incidence ranging from 2.2% to 12.7% (Sabanayagam et al., 2018). Laser retinal photocoagulation (LRP) is the first ‐line treatment for DR (Evans et al., 2014). Despite the use of anaesthetic eye drops, pain intolerance during LRP may compromise its efficacy by impacting patient adherence to treatment. A study by Chen et al. (2012) revealed that music may be useful for reducing anxiety but not pain during treat ment with intr...
Source: European Journal of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: LETTER TO THE EDITOR Source Type: research
Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of blindness in type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (DM) patients, as a consequence of impaired blood flow in the retina. Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is ...
Source: BMC Medical Imaging - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Study protocol Source Type: research
AbstractDiabetic retinopathy (DR) is a frequent complication of diabetes mellitus, and a common cause of vision impairment and blindness in these patients, yet many aspects of its pathogenesis remain unresolved. Furthermore, current treatments are not effective in all patients, are only indicated in advanced disease, and are associated with significant adverse effects. This review describes the microvascular features of DR, and how pericyte depletion and low-grade chronic inflammation contribute to the pathogenesis of this common ophthalmic disorder. Existing, novel and investigational pharmacological strategies aimed at m...
Source: Inflammopharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Metformin is commonly used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Renal insufficiency is one of the contraindications for its use. Inadvertent prescription in patients with renal insufficiency may lead to metformin-associated lactic acidosis (MALA), which is associated with a high risk of mortality. Consequently, the early recognition and management of MALA is essential.
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Communications: Adult Source Type: research
Abstract Diabetic retinopathy (DR), the primary retinal vascular complication of diabetes mellitus, is a progressive disease and a major cause of impaired vision and blindness, especially among individuals who are of working age. Early detection and treatment of DR can prevent 50% to 70% of its associated blindness. However, fewer than half of all US adults with diabetes adhere to guideline-recommended eye-screening schedules. Patients with DR typically have no symptoms in the early stage of the disease and may not seek medical evaluation until DR advances and results in vision impairment. These delays in diagnosi...
Source: The American Journal of Managed Care - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Am J Manag Care Source Type: research
More News: Biology | Blindness | Diabetes | Diabetes Mellitus | Endocrinology | Opthalmology | Study | Vitamin A