Alcohol use, pregnancy and associated risk factors: a pilot cross-sectional study of pregnant women attending prenatal care in an urban city

Alcohol consumption during pregnancy is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preventable alcohol-related developmental disability fetal alcohol syndrome. In Zambia, alcohol use and associated ris...
Source: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research

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The dangers of alcohol begin at the first sip of the first drink. Although most responsible drinking habits shouldn’t be cause for major concern, everyone who drinks runs the risk of encountering the negative effects of alcohol. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans defines moderate drinking as up to 1 drink per day for women and up to 2 drinks per day for men.  A single drink is considered as: 12 ounces of beer (5% alcohol content) 8 ounces of malt liquor (7% alcohol content) 5 ounces of wine (12% alcohol content) 1.5 ounces of 80-proof (40% alcohol content) distilled spirits or liquor (e.g., gin, rum, vodka, ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Alcohol Alcohol Rehab Information Alcoholism alcohol abuse alcohol dependence alcohol dependency alcohol detox alcohol treatment alcohol treatment center alcohol treatment facility Alcoholics Anonymous Source Type: blogs
Prenatal alcohol has long been recognized as having the potential to adversely affect fetal brain development. Alcohol consumption in women of reproductive age and in the first few weeks of an unplanned pregnancy is common. Although some children affected by alcohol exhibit characteristic minor facial anomalies, growth deficiency, and microcephaly (fetal alcohol syndrome), most children affected by alcohol have few or none of these physical features (fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, or FASD). The neurobehavioral abnormalities in FASD can include deficits in cognitive performance, executive functioning, attention, memory, ...
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Source Type: research
l Fortier Prenatal alcohol exposure is a leading cause of disability, and a major public health concern in Canada. There are well-documented barriers for women and for service providers related to asking about alcohol use in pregnancy. Confidential research is important for learning about alcohol use before, during and after pregnancy, in order to inform fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) prevention strategies. The Research Advancement through Cohort Cataloguing and Harmonization (ReACH) initiative provides a unique opportunity to leverage the integration of the Canadian pregnancy and birth cohort information regar...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 30 November 2018Source: Preventive MedicineAuthor(s): Cheryl McQuire, Raja Mukherjee, Lisa Hurt, Andrea Higgins, Giles Greene, Daniel Farewell, Alison Kemp, Shantini ParanjothyAbstractFetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) are lifelong disabilities caused by prenatal alcohol exposure. Prenatal alcohol use is common in the UK, but FASD prevalence was unknown. Prevalence estimates are essential for informing FASD prevention, identification and support.We applied novel screening algorithms to existing data to estimate the screening prevalence of FASD. Data were from a population-based coho...
Source: Preventive Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
ConclusionAccurately assessing prenatal alcohol consumption is challenging in any setting but it is exceptionally challenging when assessed 13 ‐17 years retrospectively as part of a FASD assessment for a young person sentenced to detention. Recording and recoding detailed qualitative responses was required to provide an accurate assessment of PAE using the AUDIT‐C. Standardized recording of PAE in antenatal and birth records would faci litate later assessments for FASD and provide opportunities for advice and support for women who continue to drink during pregnancy.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Source: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Original Research Article Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Accurately assessing prenatal alcohol consumption is challenging in any setting but it is exceptionally challenging when assessed 13-17 years retrospectively as part of a FASD assessment for a young person sentenced to detention. Recording and recoding detailed qualitative responses was required to provide an accurate assessment of PAE using the AUDIT-C. Standardized recording of PAE in antenatal and birth records would facilitate later assessments for FASD and provide opportunities for advice and support for women who continue to drink during pregnancy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserv...
Source: Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Alcohol Clin Exp Res Source Type: research
Alcohol is now recognized as the leading preventable cause of birth defects and developmental disorders in the United States. Each year thousands of children are born with life-long disabilities because they were exposed to alcohol prenatally. On September 9th, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism recognizes International Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) Awareness Day as a reminder that there is no “safe” level of drinking while pregnant. 
Source: NIAAA News - Category: Addiction Authors: Source Type: news
“A crisis is a terrible thing to waste,” is a phrase coined by Stanford economist Paul Romer. Politicians are always in search of new crises to address—new fires to put out—with rapid and decisive action. In their passion to appear heroic to their constituents they often act in haste, not ta king the time to develop a deep and nuanced understanding of the issue at hand, insensitive to the notion that their actions might actually exacerbate the crisis.An example of that lack of understanding was made apparent in a  press release by the office of House Majority Whip Steve Scalise (R-LA) on J...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
Fetal alcohol syndrome occurs in children as a result of alcohol exposure during the mother’s pregnancy. It can cause irreversible brain damage, growth problems and behavior issues. No amount of alcohol is safe to consume during pregnancy but the risk of fetal alcohol syndrome increases with the amount of alcohol consumed during pregnancy. A New York Times Article discuses a new study that shows more children are being diagnosed with fetal alcohol syndrome than initially realized, affecting 1.1 to 5 percent of children in the US. This is 5 times higher than previously thought, making it just as common as a diagnosis ...
Source: Cord Blood News - Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Tags: babies brain development Cord Blood pregnancy Source Type: blogs
In a new JAMA study of more than 6,000 first-graders, researchers estimate that between 1.1% and 9.8% of American children have developmental or neurological problems caused by fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs)—a significantly higher number than previous studies have reported. And out of the hundreds of children determined in the study to have FASD, only two had been previously diagnosed. The estimate comes from school-based assessments, family interviews and in-person evaluations of 6- and 7-year-olds in four communities across the country: one in the Midwest, one in the Rocky Mountains, one in the Southeast ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized drinking alcohol while pregnant drinking while pregnant drinking wine while pregnant fetal alcohol effect fetal alcohol spectrum disorder fetal alcohol syndrome fetal alcohol syndrome baby fetal alcohol syndrome definition Source Type: news
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