Distribution of high-risk human papillomavirus genotypes in male attendees at a clinic for sexually transmitted infections in Northern China.

CONCLUSIONS: HPV 16, 52, 51, 18, 39, and 59 were the most common HR genotypes detected in men in Northern China. Importantly, HPV 39, 51, and 59 are not currently covered by either the 4-valent or 9-valent HPV vaccines. PMID: 31799637 [PubMed - in process]
Source: European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci Source Type: research

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Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes cancers in men, including penile, anal, and oropharyngeal cancers. This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the prevalence, the genotypes, and the risk factors of HPV i...
Source: BMC Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes cervical cancer, anal cancer, vulvar cancer, vaginal cancer, penile cancer and oropharyngeal cancer. SCC in the genital region in particular is recognized to be caused by HPV infection, and intraepithelial lesions of the penis and vulva are termed penile intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN), respectively. Although SCC of the nail apparatus is recognized as being associated with high-risk HPVs, it is not well-known in general medicine, and its analysis has been insufficient.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Source Type: research
Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes cervical cancer, anal cancer, vulvar cancer, vaginal cancer, penile cancer, and oropharyngeal cancer. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in the genital region in particular is recognized to be caused by HPV infection, and intraepithelial lesions of the penis and vulva are termed penile intraepithelial neoplasia and vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia, respectively. Although SCC of the nail apparatus is recognized as being associated with high-risk HPVs, it is not well-known in general medicine, and its analysis has been insufficient.
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
ConclusionGender-neutral vaccination provides significant cost-effective benefits for preventing human papillomavirus-related diseases, and this effect is further enhanced by the use of the nonavalent vaccine.
Source: European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States and is a well-known cause of oropharyngeal, cervical, vaginal, vulvar, penile, and anal cancers. Despite the proven efficacy of the HPV vaccine, vaccination rates remain persistently low. Much literature has focused on attitudes toward the HPV vaccine; however, researchers have also investigated strategies clinicians can use to improve vaccination attitudes and acceptance. Such strategies include provider education, vaccine reminder/recall, and chart audit and feedback.
Source: Journal of Pediatric Health Care - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Department Source Type: research
This report provides the most recent national estimates of oral HPV prevalence among adults aged 18-69 from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2011-2014, as well as prevalence of genital HPV among adults aged 18-59 from NHANES 2013-2014. Estimates of any HPV (37 types tested) as well as high-risk HPV (14 of the 37 types) are provided. PMID: 28463105 [PubMed - in process]
Source: NCHS data brief - Category: American Health Tags: NCHS Data Brief Source Type: research
This report provides the most recent national estimates of oral HPV prevalence among adults aged 18-69 from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2011-2014, as well as prevalence of genital HPV among adults aged 18-59 from NHANES 2013-2014. Estimates of any HPV (37 types tested) as well as high-risk HPV (14 of the 37 types) are provided. PMID: 28437239 [PubMed - in process]
Source: NCHS data brief - Category: American Health Tags: NCHS Data Brief Source Type: research
Abstract Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Exposure to HPV is very common, and an estimated 65%-100% of sexually active adults are exposed to HPV in their lifetime. The majority of HPV infections are asymptomatic, but there is a 10% chance that individuals will develop a persistent infection and have an increased risk of developing a carcinoma. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has found that the following cancer sites have a strong causal relationship with HPV: cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx, including the base of...
Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: World J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
Abstract Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted disease worldwide. HPVs are oncogenic small double-stranded DNA viruses that are the primary causal agent of cervical cancer and other types of cancers, including in the anus, oropharynx, vagina, vulva, and penis. Prophylactic vaccination against HPV is an attractive strategy for preventing cervical cancer and some other types of cancers. However, there are few safe and effective vaccines against HPV infections. Current first-generation commercial HPV vaccines are expensive to produce and deliver. The goal of this study was to de...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection. It affects 80% of the population, with the initial infection usually occurring between 15 and 24 years of age. Persistent infection with high-risk oncogenic HPV genotypes, primarily types 16 and 18, is the cause of almost all cervical cancers.1 HPV is also thought to cause about 95% of anal cancers, 75% of oropharyngeal cancers, 75% of vaginal cancers, 70% of vulvar cancers, and 60% of penile cancers.2 Low-risk or non-oncogenic genotypes (eg, types 6 and 11) cause anogenital warts, low-grade cervical disease, and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.
Source: LANCET - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Comment Source Type: research
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