Assessment and diagnosis of dementia: a review for primary healthcare professionals.

Assessment and diagnosis of dementia: a review for primary healthcare professionals. Hong Kong Med J. 2019 Dec 04;25(6): Authors: Lam K, Chan WSY, Luk JKH, Leung AYM Abstract Dementia is one of the most costly, disabling diseases associated with ageing, yet it remains underdiagnosed in primary care. In this article, we present the comprehensive approach illustrated with a classical case for diagnosing dementia which can be applied by healthcare professionals in primary care. This diagnostic approach includes history taking and physical examination, cognitive testing, informant interviews, neuropsychological testing, neuroimaging, and the utility of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. For the differential diagnosis of cognitive impairment, the differences and similarities among normal ageing, mild cognitive impairment, depression, and delirium are highlighted. As primary care physicians are playing an increasingly prominent role in the caring of elderly patients in an ageing population, their role in the diagnosis of dementia should be strengthened in order to provide a quality care for patients with dementia. PMID: 31796643 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Hong Kong Med J - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Hong Kong Med J Source Type: research

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Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
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Source: Social Work in Health Care - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract Life review (LR) therapy has received considerable support as an effective treatment for depression among older adults. Researchers believe that providing LR does not require extensive training and can be done by family members who are not psychiatric professionals. If so, then training family caregivers to provide LR is a potential strategy for alleviating the shortage of resources for treating depression among the growing population of older adults experiencing depression. A pilot study that explored the feasibility of that strategy had mixed results. Seventeen (89%) of 19 caregiver-care recipient dyads...
Source: Journal of Gerontological Nursing - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: J Gerontol Nurs Source Type: research
Major Depression — the clinical type — is not a normal part of aging. Though it can appear at any age, older adults are at an increased risk. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) distinguishes this condition from having “the blues” and likens it to other medical illnesses that are treatable, like diabetes or hypertension. Overwhelming sadness and anxiety can last for weeks at a time or much longer, with a wide range of other discouraging symptoms. Yet, there are things that can help.  Statistics tell us that later in life, at least one chronic disease will affect 80 percent of u...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Aging Depression depression risk Elderly seniors Source Type: blogs
A Swedish study found that men and women with depression were much more likely to develop dementia than their peers without depression.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Depression (Mental) Mental Health and Disorders Dementia Source Type: news
Depression is a common comorbidity in dementia. Randomised controlled studies of antidepressants do not show a significant improvement in depressive symptoms in patients with comorbid dementia and are known to lead to an increase in side effects. However, there are relatively few studies of depression in dementia, and drawing firm conclusions about the use of antidepressants is limited by the amount of data available. Furthermore, it is unclear whether data can be extrapolated from similar populations (eg, those with late-life depression) to inform pharmacotherapy in this patient group. Given the lack of effectiveness and ...
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ConclusionsOur results indicate the prevalence of multiple comorbidities varies across the lifespan in DS, and in adults, rates for psychiatric comorbidities show different patterns for males and females relative to expected population rates. Further, most health comorbidities are not associated with poorer cognitive outcomes in DS, apart from autism and epilepsy. It is essential for clinicians to consider such differences to provide appropriate care and treatment for those with DS and to provide prognostic information relating to cognitive outcomes in those with comorbidities.
Source: Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Publication date: March–April 2020Source: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, Volume 67Author(s): Claudine FoxAbstractThis paper reports a study that adopted age-appropriate terminology to investigate 6–11-year-old children's attitudes towards mental illness (N = 120). The study utilized a semi-structured interview technique and card selection tasks to assess the children's attitudes to individuals diagnosed with different mental illnesses (anorexia nervosa, depression and dementia). Their attitudes were measured in terms of social distance, social functioning, emotional response and trait at...
Source: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology - Category: Child Development Source Type: research
The barrier between mind and body appears to be crumbling. Clinical practice and public perception need to catch upUnlikely as it may seem, #inflammation has become a hashtag. It seems to be everywhere suddenly, up to all sorts of tricks. Rather than simply being on our side, fighting infections and healing wounds, it turns out to have a dark side as well: the role it plays in causing us harm.It ’s now clear that inflammation is part of the problem in many, if not all, diseases of the body. And targeting immune or inflammatory causes of disease has led to a series of breakthroughs, from new treatments for rheumatoid ...
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