Hyperthermia and immunotherapy: clinical opportunities.

Hyperthermia and immunotherapy: clinical opportunities. Int J Hyperthermia. 2019 Nov;36(sup1):4-9 Authors: Hurwitz MD Abstract Hyperthermia holds great promise to advance immunotherapy in the treatment of cancer. Multiple trials have demonstrated benefit with the addition of hyperthermia to radiation or chemotherapy in the treatment of wide-ranging malignancies. Similarly, pre-clinical studies have demonstrated the ability of hyperthermia to enhance each of the 8 steps in the cancer-immunotherapy cycle including stimulation of tumor-specific immunity. While there has been an extensive recent focus on augmenting immunotherapy with radiation, surprisingly to date, there have been no clinical trials assessing the combination of hyperthermia with immunotherapy. The study of hyperthermia with immunotherapy is particularly compelling when considered in the context of a new treatment paradigm for this anti-neoplastic modality. Novel concepts include ease of treatment including elicitation of the tumor-specific response of not requiring whole tumor heating, potentially shorter treatment time, better treatment tolerance as opposed to other multi-agent approaches to immunotherapy and the ability to apply heat repeatedly with immunotherapies, unlike ionizing radiation. Several questions remained with regard to clinical integration which can be readily addressed with thoughtful clinical trial design building upon lessons learned at the bench and from clinical trials ...
Source: International Journal of Hyperthermia - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Int J Hyperthermia Source Type: research

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             Basel, 13 December 2019 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced the Phase III IMspire150 study, in people with previously untreated BRAF V600 mutation-positive advanced melanoma, met its primary endpoint of progression-free survival (PFS). The study showed adding Tecentriq ® (atezolizumab) to Cotellic® (cobimetinib) and Zelboraf® (vemurafenib) helped to reduce the risk of disease worsening or death, compared to placebo plus Cotellic and Zelboraf. A significant and clinically meaningful improvement in PFS was demonstrated in the study. The safety ...
Source: Roche Investor Update - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
grave;res J Abstract Immunotherapy has become a standard of care in oncology, following the recent approvals of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein-4 and programmed cell death-1 inhibitors in lung cancer, melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma, bladder, head and neck cancers. Besides their efficacy, these agents also generate specific immune-related adverse events. Due to the increasing prescription of immune-checkpoint inhibitors, the incidence of immune toxicity will continue to rise. The awareness of immune-related adverse events is key to ensuring both diagnosis and management of the possible...
Source: Respiratory Care - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Eur Respir Rev Source Type: research
Immunotherapy has become a standard of care in oncology, following the recent approvals of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein-4 and programmed cell death-1 inhibitors in lung cancer, melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma, bladder, head and neck cancers. Besides their efficacy, these agents also generate specific immune-related adverse events. Due to the increasing prescription of immune-checkpoint inhibitors, the incidence of immune toxicity will continue to rise. The awareness of immune-related adverse events is key to ensuring both diagnosis and management of the possible serious adverse events. Altho...
Source: European Respiratory Review - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Pulmonary pharmacology and therapeutics Reviews Source Type: research
Authors: Kamińska-Winciorek G, Cybulska-Stopa B, Lugowska I, Ziobro M, Rutkowski P Abstract The introduction of immunotherapy into the treatment of cancer patients has revolutionised the oncological approach and significantly improved patient survival. The key drugs are immune checkpoint inhibitors (CPIs), whose mechanism of action is to elicit immune response against cancer cell antigens. Three types of CPIs are currently used and approved: an anti-CTLA-4 antibody, ipilimumab; anti-PD-1 antibodies, nivolumab and pembrolizumab; and anti-PD-L1 antibodies: atezolizumab, avelumab and durvalumab. CPIs have been widely...
Source: Advances in Dermatology and Allergology - Category: Dermatology Tags: Postepy Dermatol Alergol Source Type: research
ConclusionsThe utilization of theses scores could allow a better patients selection in early trials, especially during the critical periods of dose escalation and proof-of-concept expansion cohorts.Legal entity responsible for the studyThe authors.FundingHas not received any funding.DisclosureAll authors have declared no conflicts of interest.
Source: Annals of Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Checkpoint immunotherapy has revolutionised the way that melanoma is treated and has also shown significant effectiveness in lung, bladder, renal, and head and neck cancers. At the present time, trials of checkpoint immunotherapy in cervical cancer are at early phases, but there is very good rationale for pursuing this as a treatment option, especially as cervical cancer is a virally driven cancer and therefore should be recognised by the immune system as being foreign. This review explores the biomarkers for the selection of patients for immunotherapy in other cancers, such as programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression,...
Source: Clinical Oncology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Overview Source Type: research
A research team from the Duke University Medical Center and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has uncovered a new compound with potential to make chemotherapy more effective in treating various cancers. The small-molecule inhibitor drug — JH-RE-06 — showed an ability to better-sensitize tumors to Cisplatin, the popular chemotherapy drug most often used for mesothelioma cancer patients. When combined with Cisplatin, the drug also showed an ability to prevent those tumor cells from becoming treatment resistant, a common problem with this rare cancer caused by asbestos exposure. The research was done on l...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
To the Editor I read the article by Perry et al with interest. Several other molecular mechanisms and factors may also play a role in how anesthesia may influence cancer outcomes. First, it is important to distinguish the difference between certain fluoridated anesthesia, such as sevoflurane, from their contribution to higher plasma fluoride levels. For example, it is known that sevoflurane can provide 20-fold the total daily dietary fluoride intake from all sources of fluoridated food and water combined, resulting in peak ionic fluoride levels in the range of 50 μmol/L. Hence, fluoridated anesthesia can result in extre...
Source: JAMA Surgery - Category: Sports Medicine Source Type: research
Discussion MDSCs violently emerge in pathological conditions in an attempt to limit potentially harmful immune and inflammatory responses. Mechanisms supporting their expansion and survival are deeply investigated in cancer, in the perspective to reactivate specific antitumor responses and prevent their contribution to disease evolution. These findings will likely contribute to improve the targeting of MDSCs in anticancer immunotherapies, either alone or in combination with immune checkpoint inhibitors. New evidence indicates that the expansion of myeloid cell differentiation in pathology is subject to fine-tuning, as its...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Santosh K. Ghosh1*, Thomas S. McCormick1,2 and Aaron Weinberg1* 1Biological Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, United States 2Dermatology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, United States Human beta-defensins (hBDs, −1, 2, 3) are a family of epithelial cell derived antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) that protect mucosal membranes from microbial challenges. In addition to their antimicrobial activities, they possess other functions; e.g., cell activation, proliferation, regulation of cytokine/chemokine production, migration, diffe...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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