Congenital Heart Disease and Women’s Health Across the Life Span: Focus on Reproductive Issues

Discussions about sexuality and reproduction are an important part of transition planning and must be done with an awareness of the adolescent’s developing understanding and maturity. Pregnancy imposes a hemodynamic load on the heart which may lead to cardiac, obstetric, and fetal/neonatal complications in women with CHD. Prepregnancy counselling must include an assessment of maternal and fetal risk according to several well developed models. Counselling should also include discussions about fertility and alternatives to pregnancy when appropriate. Recommendations for contraception must be made according to the patient’s cardiac lesion. In caring for women with CHD during pregnancy, a multidisciplinary cardio-obstetrics team is recommended to optimize care. More research is needed into the long-term impact of pregnancy on the prognosis of patients with CHD. As women with CHD increasingly survive into old age, more attention will need to be directed toward the treatment of menopause and acquired heart disease in this population.RésuméDe l’adolescence à un âge plus avancé, les femmes atteintes d’une cardiopathie congénitale font face à des défis uniques. Nous explorons ici les répercussions de la cardiopathie congénitale sur la santé des femmes en matière de sexualité et de reproduction et, inversement, les répercussions des antécédents des femm...
Source: Canadian Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research

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Discussions about sexuality and reproduction are an important part of transition planning and must be done with an awareness of the adolescent’s developing understanding and maturity. Pregnancy imposes a hemodynamic load on the heart which may lead to cardiac, obstetric and fetal/neonatal complications in women with CHD. Pre-pregnancy counselling must include an assessment of maternal and fetal risk according to several well-developed models. Counselling should also include discussions about fertility and alternatives to pregnancy when appropriate. Recommendations for contraception must be made according to the patie...
Source: Canadian Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Maunil K. Desai1 and Roberta Diaz Brinton2,3* 1School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States 2Center for Innovation in Brain Science, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, United States 3Departments of Pharmacology and Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, United States Women have a higher incidence and prevalence of autoimmune diseases than men, and 85% or more patients of multiple autoimmune diseases are female. Women undergo sweeping endocrinological changes at least twice during their lifetime, puberty and menopause, with many women undergoin...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Lilly Rocha was 37 years old in 2008 when she began having strange symptoms. When people asked her questions, she knew the answers but couldn’t articulate them. A tingling sensation on her left breast became painful. She thought she might have breast cancer, but her doctor assured her she was just experiencing stress from her demanding job. Her symptoms continued to get worse, and doctors continued to dismiss her. Three months later, at work, she became seriously ill. Luckily, her boss recognized the symptoms—chest and jaw pain and numbness in her left hand—and drove her to the nearest emergency room, whe...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized heart health Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 22 November 2018Source: Neurochemistry InternationalAuthor(s): O.J. Gannon, L.S. Robison, A.J. Custozzo, K.L. ZuloagaAbstractVascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia (VCID) is the second most common cause of dementia. While males overall appear to be at a slightly higher risk for VCID throughout most of the lifespan (up to age 85), some risk factors for VCID more adversely affect women. These include female-specific risk factors associated with pregnancy related disorders (e.g. preeclampsia), menopause, and poorly timed hormone replacement. Further, presence of certain ...
Source: Neurochemistry International - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
AbstractAn adequate cardiovascular (CV) prevention strategy in women should consider the acknowledgement of sex-specific risk factors, such as hypertension in pregnancy, the concomitant presence of autoimmune diseases and the benefit of evaluating subclinical organ damage and treating hypertension. In accordance to current guidelines, the diagnostic approach does not differ between men and women, although the cardiac response to pressure overload may suggest greater sensitivity in women, and may vary according to age, ethnic background and obesity, that potentiates the effect of hypertension on left ventricular (LV) hypert...
Source: High Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Prevention - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
TUESDAY, Jan. 16, 2018 -- Women whose periods started before age 12 may face an increased risk for heart disease and stroke, a new British study suggests. Early menopause, pregnancy complications and hysterectomy are also associated with a higher...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
Your Body Mass Index (BMI) is a measurement of your body fat percentage. And based on the results, you are labeled normal, overweight or obese.   But BMI can give you some crazy results. Using this measurement, I’m considered obese. And so is NFL superstar Tom Brady. You see, BMI only compares your height against your weight. It doesn’t distinguish between fat and muscle. But here’s the thing… Muscle is much denser than fat. So if you have a lot of muscle, you can have a high BMI but still be lean. There’s a much more reliable test to measure your body’s composition of fat and mu...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news
Conclusion This study, conducted on a large number of people across Europe, was backed up by similar findings in the US. It appears to show some association between people who drink higher amounts of coffee and a reduced risk of death. But the "potentially beneficial clinical implications" need to be considered carefully for a number of reasons: Although the analyses were adjusted for some confounding variables, there may be a number of other factors that differ between the groups that account for the differences in death, such as socioeconomic status, family history, other medical conditions, and use of medic...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Source Type: news
When I began writing in this spot three years ago, the headline of my very first entry was, "Getting Enough Sleep Is Smart, Not Selfish." That post went up at a time when Americans were beginning to focus more on a good night's rest. The subject came into a sharper focus, in part, because wearable technology gave us some specifics. Forget the anecdotal evidence of whether we slept well; with the touch of a button, we could know what time we fell asleep, how long we were out and how often our sleep was interrupted. The study of sleep -- and conversations around it -- began gaining traction. Among those paying ke...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This study found that overall, 20% to 40% of carcinoma cases and about half of carcinoma deaths could potentially be prevented through certain lifestyle modifications. Here are the 4 lifestyle behaviors that if practiced throughout a lifetime, were found to be linked to a lower rate of cancer incidence and death: 1. Don't smoke The study revealed that smoking contributed to 48.5% of deaths from the 12 smoking-related cancers in the United States including lung, pancreas, bladder, stomach, colon/rectal and esophagus. The message here is plain and simple -- don't ever start smoking and if you already are, quit. Smoking ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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