Cancers, Vol. 11, Pages 1963: ALDH3A1 Overexpression in Melanoma and Lung Tumors Drives Cancer Stem Cell Expansion, Impairing Immune Surveillance through Enhanced PD-L1 Output

In this study, using melanoma and NSCLC cells, we demonstrate that ALDH3A1 isozyme overexpression and activity is closely associated with a highly aggressive mesenchymal and immunosuppressive profile. The contribution of ALDH3A1 to the stemness and immunogenic status of melanoma and NSCLC cells was evaluated by their ability to grow in 3D forming tumorspheres, and by the expression of markers for stemness, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), and inflammation. Furthermore, in specimens from melanoma and NSCLC patients, we investigated the expression of ALDH3A1, PD-L1, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) by immunohistochemistry. We show that cells engineered to overexpress the ALDH3A1 enzyme enriched the CSCs population in melanoma and NSCLC cultures, changing their transcriptome. In fact, we found increased expression of EMT markers, such as vimentin, fibronectin, and Zeb1, and of pro-inflammatory and immunosuppressive mediators, such as NFkB, prostaglandin E2, and interleukin-6 and -13. ALDH3A1 overexpression enhanced PD-L1 output in tumor cells and resulted in reduced proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells when co-cultured with tumor cells. Furthermore, in tumor specimens from melanoma and NSCLC patients, ALDH3A1 expression was invariably correlated with PD-L1 and the pro-inflammatory marker COX-2. These findings link ALDH3A1 expression to tumor stemness, EMT and PD-L1 expression, and suggest that aldehyde detoxification is a redox metabolic pathway that tunes ...
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research

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Abstract Myoferlin, a protein of the ferlin family, has seven C2 domains and exhibits activity in some cells, including myoblasts and endothelial cells. Recently, myoferlin was identified as a promising target and biomarker in non-small-cell lung cancer, breast cancer, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, colon cancer, melanoma, oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, clear cell renal cell carcinoma and endometrioid carcinoma. This evidence indicated that myoferlin was involved in the proliferation, invasion and migration of tumour cells, the mechanism of which...
Source: J Cell Mol Med - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: J Cell Mol Med Source Type: research
Discussion MDSCs violently emerge in pathological conditions in an attempt to limit potentially harmful immune and inflammatory responses. Mechanisms supporting their expansion and survival are deeply investigated in cancer, in the perspective to reactivate specific antitumor responses and prevent their contribution to disease evolution. These findings will likely contribute to improve the targeting of MDSCs in anticancer immunotherapies, either alone or in combination with immune checkpoint inhibitors. New evidence indicates that the expansion of myeloid cell differentiation in pathology is subject to fine-tuning, as its...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusions The recent, first randomized clinical trial demonstrated overall and progression free survival benefits after SBRT to oligometastatic disease which supports prior retrospective case series (6). The spine is a common site of metastatic bone disease, and as high quality data continue to mature, along with completion of additional randomized clinical trials, it is expected that utility of SBRT to the spine will increase in the future. Spine SBRT is unique due to the requirement of sharp dose falloff to prevent serious neurologic morbidity. With recent advances in radiotherapy planning, robotic patient positionin...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Michal Yalon1†, Amos Toren1,2†, Dina Jabarin2, Edna Fadida3, Shlomi Constantini3 and Ruty Mehrian-Shai1* 1Pediatric Hemato-Oncology, Edmond and Lilly Safra Children's Hospital and Cancer Research Center, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan, Israel 2The Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel 3Department of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Dana Children's Hospital, Tel-Aviv-Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel Pediatric brain tumors are the most common solid tumor type and the leading cause of cancer-related death in children. The immune system plays an important r...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conclusions This review describes how leukocyte-heparanase can be a double-edged sword in tumor progression; it can enhance tumor immune surveillance and tumor cell clearance, but also promote tumor survival and growth. We also discuss the potential of using heparanase in leukocyte therapies against tumors, and the effects of heparanase inhibitors on tumor progression and immunity. We are just beginning to understand the influence of heparanase on a pro/anti-tumor immune response, and there are still many questions to answer. How do the pro/anti-tumorigenic effects of heparanase differ across different cancer types? Does...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Montreh Tavakkoli1*, Cy R. Wilkins2, Jodi V. Mones2 and Michael J. Mauro3 1Department of Internal Medicine, New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY, United States 2Department of Hematology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, United States 3Department of Hematology Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, United States Leukocytosis is a common feature of malignancies. While controversial, there appears to be an association between the degree of tumor-related leukocytosis and prognosis. In this paper, we provide evidence supporting an unt...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
This study aimed to investigate whether combining anti-PD-L1 Atezolizumab with BEV may have a synergistic effect and enhance the efficacy of both treatments in cisplatin resistant epithelial ovarian cancer (CREOC). We retrospectively analyzed 124 epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients from Gynecologic Oncology Department of Tianjin Cancer Hospital between January 2013 and June 2018, who all were diagnosed with cisplatin resistance due to progressing
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Laia Gorchs1*, Carlos Fernández Moro1,2, Peter Bankhead3, Katharina P. Kern1, Imrul Sadeak1, Qingda Meng1, Elena Rangelova4,5 and Helen Kaipe1,6* 1Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden 2Department of Pathology/Cytology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden 3Division of Pathology, Centre for Genomic &Experimental Medicine, Western General Hospital, Institute of Genetics &Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom 4Department of CLINTEC, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden 5Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Center for Digesti...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusions MDSC are major players in the immunosuppressive scenario in cancer, thanks to their phenotype heterogeneity and critical interaction with several innate immune cells, thus representing a crucial target in oncology. Here we reviewed the interactions of MDSCs with NK cells. The contribution of key cytokines, chemokines and mediators active in this process have been discussed. We also described the contribution of MDSC on angiogenesis directly or indirectly through interactions with NK and immunosuppressive activities. A parallel of the cancer associated to the decidual counterpart of these cells is discussed, a...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusions and Perspectives In this review, we have discussed important milestones from the early description of “Serum-sickness” as being due to antibodies directed against Neu5Gc epitopes all the way to the present-day therapeutic implications of these antibodies in cancer therapy. Some of these milestones have been represented in a concise timeline (Figure 6). While the “Xenosialitis” hypothesis is well-supported in the human-like mouse models, it has yet to be conclusively proven in humans. It remains to be seen if “Xenosialitis” plays a role in other uniquely-human diseases. FI...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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