How Medicaid work requirements could exacerbate the opioid epidemic.

How Medicaid work requirements could exacerbate the opioid epidemic. Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2019 Dec 04;:1-3 Authors: Andrews CM, Humphreys K, Grogan CM Abstract In 2018, the Trump Administration took the unprecedented step of allowing states to impose work requirements as a condition of Medicaid eligibility. States can apply for a demonstration waiver to require Medicaid beneficiaries aged 19-64 who do not meet exemption criteria (e.g., disability, caring for a sick relative) to participate in "community engagement" activities, which include employment, volunteering, and enrollment in a qualifying education or job training program. Debate thus far has focused primarily around the important issue of whether such requirements are legal. Less attention has focused on another serious concern - namely, that work requirements could exacerbate the nation's most urgent public health crisis: the opioid epidemic. Many enrollees with opioid use disorder who are unable to meet states' community engagement criteria will not qualify for an exemption from the work requirements, and risk being dropped from Medicaid enrollment. Refusing health insurance to individuals who are unable to meet work requirements could result in significant losses in coverage among a highly vulnerable population. Implementing new barriers to Medicaid coverage will hinder the effectiveness of massive state and federal investments in improving access to evidence-based addiction tre...
Source: The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse Source Type: research

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What is Fentanyl? According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Fentanyl is a powerful synthetic opioid analgesic that is similar to morphine, but is 50 to 100 times more potent. It is a schedule II prescription drug, and it is typically used to treat patients with severe pain, for side effects surrounding aggressive cancer treatments or to manage pain after major surgery. It can be administered as an injection, a transdermal patch or as a lozenge. Under the medical supervision of a professional, there is little risk for addiction. However, that is not to be overlooked, as any exposure to Fentanyl at all will run the ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Detox Resources for Alcohol and Drugs/Opiates Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Heroin Medical Substance Abuse Synthetic drug abuse drug abuse epidemic fentanyl opioid Source Type: blogs
Physicians should routinely ask patients about firearms in their home and whether guns are locked and safely stored, writes James S. Kahn, M.D., a professor of medicine at Stanford University, in aneditorial published today in theAnnals of Internal Medicine. The editorial was published alongside aposition paper from the American College of Physicians on reducing firearm injuries and deaths in the United States.“Firearm-related violent death is an extraordinary problem made even more alarming by the prevalence of guns in the households of persons with dementia and the variation in firearm injuries related to racial di...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Annals of Internal Medicine firearm violence gun safety guns James S. Kahn Source Type: research
Dharav Sunil ShahIndian Journal of Public Health 2017 61(3):205-207Globally, alcohol has become the most common risk factor for death and disability in the young age group of 15–49 years. Its use has been rapidly increasing in developing countries. It is a critical time wherein if effective preventive measures are not undertaken urgently, damage done will be difficult to reverse. However, health professionals are not responding to the alcohol epidemic in the manner that they responded to the tobacco epidemic. The article discusses two beliefs which are making us accept the use of alcohol as normal. Recent evidence in...
Source: Indian Journal of Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: research
Being a family caregiver today is a demanding responsibility. If caregiving is stressful for the “typical” caregiver—a 49-year-old woman—think how much more is at stake when the caregiver is a child or teenager. Yet more than a million youngsters ages 8–18 take on challenging tasks to help a parent, grandparent, sibling, or other relative. While that number is undoubtedly an underestimate, it does not even include an emerging subgroup—children whose parents are struggling with opioid addiction. If we have limited information about the young people taking care of those with diabetes, canc...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Featured Population Health Public Health Quality Agnes Leu child caregivers family caregivers National Alliance for Caregiving Saul Becker United Hospital Fund Source Type: blogs
I didn’t vote for you. You see, I was born with a brain injury. Doctors at Children’s Hospital in Boston told my parents I would never be able to walk normally. Young children are mean. As a young boy, insults, and laughs became a daily ritual. When I walked into a classroom, a restaurant, or down a street, people didn’t look into my eyes. They always looked down as I limped awkwardly along. But I overcame and became a varsity athlete at a prep school outside of Boston. As a teenager, I grew strong, and anybody that made fun of my limp or my awkward gate became irrelevant. Frankly, Mr. President, the day ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Mr. President, what in God’s name are you doing? Your Attorney General, Jeff Sessions, has turned the clock back in our country almost 35 years. Our nation’s heroin epidemic is a health crisis and will never be solved with a lock-’em-up-and-throw-away-the-key solution. Despite all intelligent research leading to a mandate conclusion that incarceration will not ever diminish drug addiction and the radical negative effects it has on our economy, “My Favorite Martian,” Jeff Sessions, has just ordered federal prosecutors to chase far harsher sentences against drug-addict-criminals. Mr. Trump, who ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
The authors of a recent Health Affairs Blog post argue that 42 CFR Part 2, the law designed to protect confidentiality of patients with substance use disorders, is outdated and unnecessary. We could not disagree more. 42 CFR Part 2 provides bedrock protections for people with substance use disorders that are as critical now as they were in the 1970s when the law was first enacted. The purpose of the confidentiality law is to ensure that a person with a substance use disorder is not made more vulnerable to discriminatory practices and legal consequences as a result of seeking treatment. Unfortunately, patients with sub...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Featured Population Health Public Health Quality 42 CFR Part 2 HIPAA opioid epidemic patient discrimination patient privacy substance use treatment Source Type: blogs
On November 17, 2016, Surgeon General Vivek Murphy released the first report on substance use disorder (SUD) in the U.S. This landmark document described the tremendous toll of alcohol and drug use on the health and well-being of our nation. With the report, the Surgeon General issued a call to action, stating “how we respond to this crisis is a test for America.” Highlighted in the recommendations was the need to address the segregation of SUD treatment outside of medical care and the need to fight persistent stigma. However, full implementation of these recommendations remains nearly impossible so long as the...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Featured Health Professionals Population Health Public Health Quality 42 CFR Part 2 ADA addiction HIPAA opioid epidemic patient privacy Substance Use Disorders Source Type: blogs
The rising rates of opioid deaths and the legalization of marijuana sale and use for adults have made substance use a prominent topic from local governments to presidential politics. As illustrated by numerous articles in Health Affairs’ June 2016 theme issue on behavioral health, substance use policy debates are now focused as never before on prevention and treatment. At the same time, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has begun creating momentum to incorporate behavioral health initiatives into primary care, calling upon primary care physicians to expand counseling and advice about substance use, detect patients with s...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Drugs and Medical Technology Featured Health Professionals Population Health Quality alcohol abuse drug abuse Opioid Addiction prediatrics Primary Care Substance Use Disorders Source Type: blogs
Alicia Cook is from New Jersey "F*** junkies. It's disgusting. What lowlifes." Thursday morning began like all of my other Thursday mornings. I was at Starbucks. I wanted a Venti Iced Chai Latte because it tastes like Christmas. The line was long; two women in tailored suits and pumps were chatting in front of me. The newspaper rack caught one of their attentions and she nudged her friend towards the headline without picking the paper up. That's when she said it. One of the only words that can make me visibly cringe. My eyes darted to the headline. It was highlighting my state's widespread heroin problem. Th...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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