Mesodermal Progenitor Cells Enable the Generation of Vascularized Organoids

Researchers have made considerable progress in the construction of small, functional tissue sections called organoids over the past decade, enabled by a combination of better understanding the mechanisms involved in regeneration and embryonic development of tissues, advances in 3-D bioprinting, guidance of cell behavior via appropriate provision of signal molecules, and the generation of environments that mimic an existing tissue environment. Every tissue requires its own specific recipe of signals and environment in order to form a functional organoid, but researchers have demonstrated the manufacture of organoids for liver, kidney, lung, and thymus, among others. Organoids are tiny, usually a millimeter or two in size. They are a stepping stone to the generation of patient matched replacement organs on demand, given a cell sample as a starting point. Ever since the first organoids were generated, however, the blocking challenge to scaling up engineered tissue in size has been the inability to generate organoids that incorporate functional blood vessel networks. In cross-sections of natural tissues, several hundred capillaries pass through every square millimeter. Absent this microvasculature, blood (and thus the necessary oxygen and nutrients for cell survival) cannot perfuse through more than a few millimeters into tissues. Producing vasculature in engineered tissues has proven to be challenging. That it is so challenging is why considerable effort has gone t...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

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Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Recipients of solid organ transplant (SOT) are at risk of viral infection and development of viral-driven malignancy (EBV-PTLD) due to immunosuppressive medications to prevent organ rejection. Treatments are limited by poor efficacy and organ toxicity, and reduction in immunosuppression to enable the patient's immune system fight the infection risks organ rejection. Allogeneic viral specific T-cells (VST) have been used to treat viral infections after stem cell transplant, and here we evaluated VST for the treatment of CMV, ADV, EBV-PTLD and BK in six SOT (heart, liver, kidney, lung) recipients.
Source: Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: 528 Source Type: research
In this study, we investigated the link between AF and senescence markers through the assessment of protein expression in the tissue lysates of human appendages from patients in AF, including paroxysmal (PAF) or permanent AF (PmAF), and in sinus rhythm (SR). The major findings of the study indicated that the progression of AF is strongly related to the human atrial senescence burden as determined by p53 and p16 expression. The stepwise increase of senescence (p53, p16), prothrombotic (TF), and proremodeling (MMP-9) markers observed in the right atrial appendages of patients in SR, PAF, and PmAF points toward multiple inter...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Abstract Stem cells are the foundation of all mammalian life. Stem cells build and maintain our bodies throughout life. Two types of stem cells are discerned.1) Embryonic stem cells (ES cells) are briefly present in the early human or mouse embryo, a few days after fertilization. These ES cells can be grown indefinitely in the lab and have the potential to build each and every tissue in our body. Because of this 'pluripotency', ES cells hold great promise for therapeutic application in the field of regenerative medicine. It is also possible to take skin cells (or other cells) from adults and convert these in the l...
Source: The Keio Journal of Medicine - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Keio J Med Source Type: research
This study shows that CA are released from periventricular and subpial regions to the cerebrospinal fluid and are present in the cervical lymph nodes, into which cerebrospinal fluid drains through the meningeal lymphatic system. We also show that CA can be phagocytosed by macrophages. We conclude that CA can act as containers that remove waste products from the brain and may be involved in a mechanism that cleans the brain. Moreover, we postulate that CA may contribute in some autoimmune brain diseases, exporting brain substances that interact with the immune system, and hypothesize that CA may contain brain markers that m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Every organ in the body is capable, to some extent, of repairing itself after an injury. As part of this process, scar tissue forms and then recedes to make room for normal tissue when healing is complete.However, when healing is disrupted — whether by chronic injury or disease — the cells that make up scar tissue can go rogue, continuously dividing and spreading until the scar eventually strangles the organ it was intended to help heal, which can lead to organ failure.That progressive, out-of-control scarring is called fibrosis, and it can occur in any organ in the body. Fibrosis plays a major role in many dis...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study demonstrates for the first time that senescent cells secrete functional LTs, significantly contributing to the LTs pool known to cause or exacerbate idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Against Senolytics https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/11/against-senolytics/ There is no consensus in science that is so strong as to have no heretics. So here we have an interview with a naysayer on the matter of senolytic treatments, who argues that the loss of senescent cells in aged tissues will cause more harm to long-term health than the damage they will do by remaining. To be clear, I think this to be a ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, high-dose NR induces the onset of WAT dysfunction, which may in part explain the deterioration of metabolic health. Towards a Rigorous Definition of Cellular Senescence https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/11/towards-a-rigorous-definition-of-cellular-senescence/ The accumulation of lingering senescent cells is a significant cause of aging, disrupting tissue function and generating chronic inflammation throughout the body. Even while the first senolytic drugs capable of selectively destroying these cells already exist, and while a number of biotech companies are working on the productio...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Background. Cardiovascular comorbidity is of increasing importance after transplantation. Metabolic syndrome (MS) contributes to the risk for cardiovascular sequelae. Our aim was to assess the risk for MS in pediatric solid organ and stem cell transplant recipients by comparing them with matched untransplanted peers in a multicenter study. Methods. We prospectively assessed MS in 295 pediatric transplant recipients and compared them with 1475 age- and sex-matched controls. Results. Posttransplant metabolic syndrome (PTMS) was most frequent in lung (43%) and kidney (39%), followed by liver (16%) and stem cell (13%) ...
Source: Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Tags: Original Clinical Science–General Source Type: research
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