TDQ-30-A New Color Picture-Naming Test for the Diagnostic of Mild Anomia: Validation and Normative Data in Quebec French Adults and Elderly.

CONCLUSIONS: The TDQ-30 has the potential to become a valuable picture-naming test for the diagnosis of mild anomia associated with pathological aging. PMID: 31792492 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Arch Clin Neuropsychol Source Type: research

Related Links:

Can you distinguish the taste of a red wine versus a rosé? How about the look of a 1960s muscle car versus a foreign import? Do you prefer to grow lilies or tulips? Would you rather listen to Dark Side of the Moon or “Fly Me to the Moon”? To answer any of these questions, you need to use your semantic memory. Your semantic memory is your store of factual knowledge of the world and the meaning of words. It’s how you know that a fork is for eating (not twirling your hair) and what color a lion is. It’s both the source of your vocabulary and how you know what something does even if you don&rsquo...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Brain and cognitive health Healthy Aging Memory Source Type: blogs
Wei Li1†, Wei-Min Xiao1†, Yang-Kun Chen1*, Jian-Feng Qu1, Yong-Lin Liu1, Xue-Wen Fang2, Han-Yu Weng1 and Gen-Pei Luo11Department of Neurology, Dongguan People’s Hospital, Dongguan, China2Department of Radiology, Dongguan People’s Hospital, Dongguan, ChinaBackground: Anxiety is prevalent after a stroke. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development of poststroke anxiety (PSA) remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and neuroimaging risk factors for development of PSA and examine the effects of PSA on activities of daily living (ADL) and quality of life (...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Vincenzo Tigano1, Giuseppe Lucio Cascini2, Cristina Sanchez-Castañeda3, Patrice Péran4 and Umberto Sabatini5* 1Department of Juridical, Historical, Economic and Social Sciences, University of Magna Graecia, Catanzaro, Italy 2Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Magna Graecia, Catanzaro, Italy 3Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychobiology, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain 4ToNIC, Toulouse NeuroImaging Center, Université de Toulouse, Inserm, UPS, Toulouse, France 5Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Magna Graecia, Catanzaro, Ita...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Photo credit Damir Bosnjak Dear Carol:  About six months ago my dad had a stroke that’s left him struggling to get out his words. Since he was always so eloquent, this is extra hard on him. I dread visiting him at the nursing home because my visits seem to cause him more frustration than pleasure. I know he wants me to visit, but maybe the fact that we’d always had fun debating ideas makes it harder on him since I bring back memories of better days. I love him and want to spend as much time with him as I can, but how do I do this without causing him grief?  – RE Read Carol's answer to the r...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
June is National Aphasia Awareness Month, and I wanted to share some of what I have learned on my journey through aphasia after brain injury. According to Wikipedia, the term aphasia implies that one or more communication modalities in the brain have been damaged—and are therefore functioning incorrectly. The difficulties for people with aphasia can range from occasional trouble finding words to losing the ability to speak, read, or write; their intelligence, however, is unaffected. Since no two brain injuries are ever the same, the way aphasia affects one person can vary greatly from the next person. In my own expe...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Objective:To provide interdisciplinary therapy and support to patients with early stage Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) and their caregivers. Group goals include providing functional communication strategies, decreasing isolation, supporting caregiver resilience, educating about PPA and current research, and enhancing communication and connection through music therapy.Background:There are groups for Alzheimer’s disease, stroke aphasia, traumatic brain injury, etc. but there are limited group opportunities for patients and families suffering from PPA. Because of this gap, we sought to develop and evaluate a multidis...
Source: Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Clinical Neuro-rehabilitation Source Type: research
Conclusions:Elevated CSF Tau levels in AD patients could be surrogate biomarker for AD subtypes with predominant early cortical symptoms and atrophy. There is a need for a systematic prospective unbiased follow-up to see if rapid clinical progression in AD is related to elevated T-Tau and distinct AD subtypes.Disclosure: Dr. Pillai has nothing to disclose. Dr. Khrestian has nothing to disclose. Dr. Bekris has nothing to disclose. Dr. Safar has nothing to disclose. Dr. Leverenz has received personal compensation for activities with Axovant, GE Healthcare and Navidea Biopharmaceuticals as a consultant.
Source: Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Aging and Dementia: Biomarkers Source Type: research
This article does not include any meta-analysis and aims simply at providing a comprehensive overview of the raw data reported in this field to date, as an aid to researchers.
Source: Neurophysiologie Clinique - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Publication date: December 2016 Source:The Lancet Neurology, Volume 15, Issue 13 Author(s): Mengxuan Tang, Davis C Ryman, Eric McDade, Mateusz S Jasielec, Virginia D Buckles, Nigel J Cairns, Anne M Fagan, Alison Goate, Daniel S Marcus, Chengjie Xiong, Ricardo F Allegri, Jasmeer P Chhatwal, Adrian Danek, Martin R Farlow, Nick C Fox, Bernardino Ghetti, Neill R Graff-Radford, Christopher Laske, Ralph N Martins, Colin L Masters, Richard P Mayeux, John M Ringman, Martin N Rossor, Stephen P Salloway, Peter R Schofield, John C Morris, Randall J Bateman Background Autosomal dominant familial Alzheimer’s disease (ADAD) is a ...
Source: The Lancet Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Worldwide,  nearly44 million  people now have Alzheimer's disease (AD) or related dementia, making these conditions the  top cause of disabilities in later life. The biopharma industry has invested billions of dollars into research to treat and prevent AD1, yet this work has faced many obstacles, including difficulty identifying biomarkers, tracking the disease ’s progress in the brain, and recruiting patients to trials while they are still asymptomatic. But in recent years, we’ve begun to see breakthroughs that is driving our research in new directions. Many of these accomplishments were hi...
Source: EyeForPharma - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
More News: Academia | Alzheimer's | Aphasia | Brain | France Health | Neurology | Psychology | Stroke | Study