Bedside Cardiac Ultrasound: Suprasternal Notch View-Detected Pulmonary Artery Clot in Transit

A 59-year-old man with known hypertension presented to the Emergency Department with 3  weeks of worsening shortness of breath and pleuritic chest pain. On arrival, vitals demonstrated a temperature of 36°C (98.2°F), heart rate of 120 beats/min, blood pressure of 134/87 mm Hg, respiratory rate of 40 breaths/min, and SpO2 of 96% on 6 L nasal cannula. A 12-lead electrocardiogram de monstrated inferior lead t-wave inversions. Physical examination revealed bibasilar crackles and left calf tenderness. Laboratory results demonstrated a D-dimer> 4000  ng/mL and high-sensitivity serial troponins of 77 ng/L and 97 ng/L.
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Visual Diagnosis in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

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Wrapping up this year and looking back on the particularly interesting developments in medical technology, we at Medgadget are impressed and very excited about the future. We’re lucky to cover one of the most innovative fields of research and o...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Exclusive Source Type: blogs
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Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
A 77 y.o. woman with a history of hypertension and congestive heart failure presented for acute onset chest pain and shortness of breath. She stated that she woke up in the morning with a central chest pressure with associated shortness of breath. She had been feeling well the day before.She had no h/o CAD but had a history of " unspecified cardiomyopathy "No old EKGs or angiogram were available.This ECG was texted to me with no information:What do you think?There is ST elevation in inferior leads, with reciprocal ST depression in aVL, so one must strongly suspect acute inferior MI.However, 3 features made me thi...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
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Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
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Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
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Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
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Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
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Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
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Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
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Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
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